Building a stitch & glue boat in Fiji

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Saqa, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 2,467
    Likes: 123, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 693
    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    Mr upchurch is right, there are +1000`s different kinds of product labelled under the "epoxy" umbrella... the type im referring to is the composites industry standard, amine cured 2 part epoxy resin, usually mixed in a 4:1 or 5:1 ratio.

    There are single part epoxy paints, 2 part epoxy paints, floor paints, tank liners, the list goes on, but these are all epoxies... tho not the type we are discussing here...

    Heres a pictorial showcase which shows what is commonly built using epoxy resin, besides little plywood boats that is;

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Heres some more good techincal reading too -> http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&r...=0vKDNH3-XB7e3R6bdoQOng&bvm=bv.55819444,d.dGI

    Your concerns with proper epoxy laminating resin, for a little plywood boat, would be eliminated should you choose to read up on it - as we have all done before and thus advise you accordingly... its up to you mate...
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 681
    Likes: 18, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 75
    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    I mentioned installing forward controls in an earlier post. This is the kind of system I am thinking about. Forward controls without a regular console
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Yah, a small craft with a center consoles look like windsurfer with a refrigerator stacked amidships.

    I prefer side consoles on small craft...better looking and easier to route the cables aft to the engine.

    A stick for steering is fantastic for low power boats...stick, cable and pulleys..the old fashion style works great
     
  4. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,171
    Likes: 189, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I have never considered contaminates on the wood surface. Just trusted that it is clean.
    For the plywood boats apparently the wood was clean.
    For strip planked boats I have to cut strips out of 1, 2 and 4" boards with lots of waste, then sand the surface to make it smooth. Apparently that has been enough to get clean wood.
    I don't use silicones and oils (except in the cars) in my shop/ garage.

    Good luck. Hoping for the best is all I know to do, except if I see something looking like oil I don't use that wood. Silicone you can't typically see, of course.

    BTW, I work at the plant where the aircraft above was made and that epoxy has no relationship to what we are talking about. Cured at 350 degrees F under 80PSI pressure, with a 36% resin content, on Carbon fiber with a higher stiffness than most of us will ever purchase, and it is a Pre-preg.
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Excellent side console...
     
  6. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 681
    Likes: 18, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 75
    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    Yup she a beauty, I am going to implement something like this. The vehicle examiner came by today to check out the work so far. He be very impressed!
     
  7. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Stay away from solvent washes or other witchcraft. They always add surface impurities. Soap and water...washed off with plenty of water is best.

    At one time it was common to wash an entire sheet of plywood before impregnating it with paint or epoxy.

    The thought being .....surface contamination and raising the grain of the wood to achieve better penetration.

    Evidently a plywood surfacing machine at the factory can polish , over heat and surface harden the wood and this retards penetration
     
  8. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,171
    Likes: 189, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    The factory heating and polishing of the ply seams like a real possibility on Fir plywood at least.
    Sounds like a good reason to run a random orbital over the surface to help with bonding if there is some suspicion.
     
  9. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 681
    Likes: 18, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 75
    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    The rep for the only FG supplier came to check out the build today and see why the roving was no good. We took a length and draped it onto the boat and hand pressed/pushed it around and it draped cleanly and laid flat on the seams, the way it grabbed the curves on the bow reminded me of Chinese finger trap :/ most of the strands laid across the seams at around 45 degrees :/
     
  10. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 2,467
    Likes: 123, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 693
    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    perfect... exactly what you need. Same reason you use +-45deg double bias tape along your chines etc.
     
  11. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    When you do the main sheathing lamination on your skiff , its worthwhile to lay the cloth on the hull, fit, trim, add a few pieces of masking tape to hold things in place...then let the dry cloth rest on the boat overnight.

    The cloth will relax a little and then be very easy to impregnate and work with in the morning

    In the perfect world every fiber would cross a joint at 45. The world aint perfect so many fibers will cross at less than ideal angles.

    Relaxing the cloth helps deal with this
     
  12. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 681
    Likes: 18, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 75
    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    I am confused a bit though. I was expecting the 600gsm to jump of the hull and try to strangle me! :O I was surprised how well she behaved draped on the hull and over the seams

    Still confused about another thing too. Why is tape about 6" wide or so? Cant find this info anywhere. Why cant tape be a couple of foot wide?
     
  13. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 3,171
    Likes: 189, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    My question is why do you want tape 6" wide?
    I've only used 2 - 3".
    Once you get past a small distance the rest of the width doesn't do anything for the strength of the joint.
     
  14. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 681
    Likes: 18, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 75
    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    I cannot answer why 6" wide with any authority

    But my my question is, why not 2 feet wide?
    4m boat
    9mm ply
    55cm panels
    2 feet wide 450gsm double bias tape
     

  15. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,379
    Likes: 149, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    ........ I suppose once it's over a certain width maybe it's not tape......... some fabric like 4-6 oz woven like for surfboards comes at about 700mm
    http://www.surfblanksaustralia.com/...ss-products/fibreglass-cloth/cut-length-price
    http://www.dionchemicals.com/products/6_oz_fibreglass_cloth/6_oz_cloth_product_list.html/ref/190
    http://www.nuplexcomposites.com/aus...fs/products/reinforcements/Reinforcements.pdf

    Jeff.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.