Building a stitch & glue boat in Fiji

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Saqa, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    Lol I started out with a spoon and then a knife but the first cup of putty started heating in my hand before I got very far. Took too long to mix the talc in

    Pics of the current effort

    Restitched
    [​IMG]

    Cheer squad
    [​IMG]

    Epoxy glue
    [​IMG]

    Fill
    [​IMG]

    Mess
    [​IMG]

    Blade honed on 400 grit sic paper wetted
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    I had to use thicker then regular binding wire to hold the curves in the bow area and wasnt confident on epoxy spot gluing being enough. It took me 12 straight hours to glue and fill green on green, including coffee, cigy, dinner, babysitting and such
     
  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Also remember the ziplock plastic bag applicator trick. Masking tape one corner of the bag. Add thickened epoxy goo to the bag then with scissors snip off the corner. Squeeze the bag and goo squirts out the snipped off corner.

    This method saves time loading the syringe and thus gives more working time before your mixed goo bursts into flames and burns your shop down
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Also your goo formula looks a bit thin. Perhaps more filler
     
  5. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    Yeah for the inside seams will have to sort something out, saw a nice fat stainless cake decorator at the supermarket. Would prefer disposable, lol no decent ziplock bags on the shelves here....just flimsy garbage!
     
  6. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    First batch was a bit thin, after that had it sorted mate, no drips or runs. Like cake frosting
     
  7. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    Dont know if you guys know of this, the ply is made from a Fijian timber called Damanu. Its a fantastic wood. Best stuff for long hard working handles like hoes and shovels, waterproof and knotless. Feels like Tasmanian oak to touch. I made a spear handle from 10m stuff and pulling sticks for a 50m dragnet with it and it takes the punishment. Classified as semihardwood by the local hardware yards
     
  8. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    Another angle on the plane slice, optical illusion makes it look like a trough but its flat bevel and the sharpness of the blade shined the surface!
    [​IMG]
     
  9. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Now sand that corner to make a radius before you put whatever glass you have to make the joint strength. Glass doesn't like sharp corners like the edge of a board. You will be very angry when you get the glass lifting up and a void underneath it if you don't sand round.

    Nice progress.
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm not sure what Damanu is, but it looks to be a shorea (meranti), likely one of the reds (there's about 30 sub genesis of shorea) that are common in that part of the world. It's a good material and fairly strong for it's weight.

    There are three basic types of fillet mixtures - cosmetic, light and heavy structural. Cosmetic is just as it sounds and typically uses very light filler materials, such as balloons, spheres and talc, with a bit of silica to control viscosity. These mixtures have little strength and are easy to sand. The structural fillet mixtures require fibrous filler materials, such as cotton flock, wood flour, silica, milled fibers, etc. These mixtures are harder to sand and much stronger.

    Plywood seams need structural fillet mixtures. Talc might be used in these to ease sanding effort, but mostly you're looking for a fillet mix that's strong.

    The inside corner of a joint is the most important one in taped seam construction. Assuming sufficient panel overlap, the outside of the seam places the sheathing in tension, which the 'glass cloth provides easily, but the inside is under compression, so the fillet is used to not only make the smooth transition from the two panel planes, but to absorb and distribute compression loads along the panel faces.

    The "Epoxy Book" from System Three and the "User's Guide" from West System cover this procedures quite well, including mixing and filler materials. The choice of sheathings is also important and dependent on the application, usually panel thickness determined. For example, 1/4" panels typically only need a single layer of 6 ounce cloth on each side of the seam. If it's highly loaded, like a bulkhead under a deck stepped mast, you might use 6 ounce biax instead or two layers of 6 ounce cloth on each side.

    Familiarizing yourself with the different mixes and taping schedules would be a good idea. Also learning how to mix epoxy, so it doesn't "kick" in the mixing pot and other application techniques would make your project go much smoother.
     
  11. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    The epoxy I am using is quite thick, as you can see in the pics the neat epoxy already fills on most of the seam gap. The talc filled is just to smooth over and get planed and sanded out after radius. In after plane shots you can see the darker pink neat epoxy starting to show through the filler bits

    Lol I think I am getting lost between the metric and imperial
     
  12. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

  13. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    From that site is appears that you have many species of quality wood available for boats.

    Even teak

    You would have no problem building a plywood on frame boat
     
  14. Saqa
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    Saqa Senior Member

    It does appear so but the dont have anything in stock, I have checked all the outlets. I believe whats there is sold to Aus and NZ before locals can get their hands on some. It sucks. I have managed to locate a 20' length of 8x1 undressed damanu plank though that has been sitting in a yard for quite a few years
     

  15. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    This is how small boatbuilders work. They hang around lumber mills and shipyards picking up pieces. Soon you will have a nice stack of good stuff at. Your shop.

    Im in a shipyard now. All offcuts and scraps goes into a special bin. If a small builder needs a piece of timber or plywood offcut he just asks and takes whatever he needs.
     
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