Building a small work barge with plywood

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by indianbayjoe, Nov 20, 2010.

  1. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Please excuse my ignorance, but what is a 'garvey' ??

    And why wouldn't someone want to use drywall type screws? I've found them to be a great fastener...good snug fit that holds without backing out.

    Perhaps the floating support(s) can be built to be 'disposable' after x-number of years, rather than the time, material, and expense of maintaining a rust free steel structure?

    I'm learning here. I'm interested in a floating cottage/home.
     
  2. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

  3. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

  4. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

  5. indianbayjoe
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    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Well were not looking to build a house boat barge but the idea is intriguing. Lets see how the base barge works out. We just found an ideal model crane to mount on the barge. A 3200 # telescoping model. Should do the trick if i win the bid. I guess were going to stick with regular lumber even though I have gotten the thumbs up both ways. I see some reasons why not to use Pt especially if its not dry enough but even if this one lasts 20 years, thats plenty long enough unless someone wants to put it in a museum later. Actually someone cound build a really nice house boat to use as a floating camp for a fairly reasonable price.
     
  6. indianbayjoe
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    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Is the main reason I am hearing to use galvanized over stainless fasteners strength?
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    No. Corrosion of s.s. under water is a problem. Google "crevice corrosion stainless steel" and you will find a lot about it.

    Just one example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crevice_corrosion
     
  8. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    you had originally stated a price of around $1000. . Stainless is expensive,
    and not as strong as galvanized . I know it is "stainless" , but it is not better .

    What are the cost estimates for glass and epoxy ? It could be built in a week no problem.

    it might be worth your time to ask a welded how much to weld up.
     
  9. indianbayjoe
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    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Actually at this point chick has the updated estimate for materials, plywood, glass, resin for the 12 X 24 X 2 around 2,400.00 not including labor. Haven't priced it out in steel yet. That is next for comparison. We have the capability to weld it up on location as we do for wood. Most of the prebuild, at least for wood can be done in our heated shop. the actual construct will have to be done outside or in our un heated shop due to the width. The 1000$ number must have come from what it cost to build the original one 25 years ago. We will document the project once it starts.
     
  10. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Yah, for underwater work, In sea water, galvanized fasteners last a long time. SS fasteners pit corrode and the heads snap off. When you deprive SS of oxygen it corodes. SS is best above the waterline. SS Dry wall screws are perfect for many areas
     
  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Garvey, punt, scow, sampan...seems to be many names to describe a similar craft. Generally a self propelled flat bottom work boat with sheared blunt ends as apposed to a square ended barge that you must tow. Garvey's tend to be sporty. The classic Boston Whaler could be considered a Garvey
     

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  12. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    "Rolling Barges"

    Thanks Michael for the garvey answer.

    Now, how about this item...Rolling Barges

    •Giant Double Deck Pontoon Boat / Party Barge.
    •17 feet wide and 19 to 29 feet long on the water.
    •8 1/2 feet wide on the highway
    •Tow with any full-size pickup or SUV
    •Fold out in 20 minutes
    •Up to 500 sq ft Main Deck, 150 sq ft Upstairs
    •DOUBLE the size of the largest pantoon boats.
     

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  13. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Exellent idea. Perhaps your Cat yacht tender should also have small ball wheels designed into the hulls aft, so that one man can haul it on a ramp or manhandle on deck
     
  14. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Haven't looked thru the pricing totally, but here are their figures:
    http://rollingbarge.com/uploads/RollingBarge.com_21x17_Options_and_Prices_5-26-10.pdf
     

  15. indianbayjoe
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    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    They look to be expensive when all is said and done.
     
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