Building a 10' Wood Duck Kayak... Help needed with wood choice

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by cdb5015, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. LP
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    LP Flying Boatman

    No one has mentioned the use of S-glass. You could go lighter glass for the same strength. Most likely the OP will go with 3mm ply and two layers of 6 oz. glass since he already has the 6 oz. glass. I built one of my kayaks with 1/8" ply 6 oz. E-glass inside and out. I has proved durable and fairly light.
     
  2. cdb5015
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: PA

    cdb5015 Junior Member

    Thanks for the reply. I really appreciate all of the insight that everyone has been giving me so far.

    The reason I am doing a 10' is because I am building it for my girlfriend, who has limited space to store the kayak. It is also a bit lighter and easier for her to get on top of her vehicle.

    Oh, and this boat isn't for hunting. The model itself is called the Wood Duck. Sorry for the confusion.

    ---

    On another note, I would have access to 5mm Okoume too. Basically, I can get 3mm or 5mm. The supplier is backordered for over 2 months on the 4mm, so its out of the question for me.

    This is the supplier. I want to go with them because I am in their free-shipping zone. Saves me a ton on shipping.

    http://www.harborsales.net/tabid/130/Default.aspx?ProductTypeId=132
     
  3. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    So use unglassed 1/4" plywood because what matters is stiffness at the same weight.
     
  4. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    The 5mm is just a bit under 1/4". I would heartily recommend it without glassing. Or, if you do glass, the 5mm is okay if you don't mind a few pounds extra. You'd be building it pretty rugged that way.
     
  5. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    By the way, the panels on a kayak are narrow enough that you could have the 5mm thinned to any thickness. Many shops have a thickness sander. For a few bucks ($10?) you could have any thickness you desire. A kayak panel would be less than the 36" width that is common for those machines.
     
  6. ericclark

    ericclark Guest

    Think that a good boat plan may help.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 8, 2013
  7. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    That's one of those sites that if you click on anything on the page you can't get off of it without closing the computer window or sometimes the computer itself with the ctrl-alt-delete emergency shutdown. It keeps asking if you really want to leave, you click that yes, you're ******* right I want to leave this ******* site, but it still won't let you go.
     
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  8. bregalad
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    bregalad Senior Member

    OP - You don't mention where you are.
    These folks claim to have a decent selection
    http://www.marine-plywood.us/
    Shipping might be a deal breaker.
     
  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    No way would I suggest 5mm - the extra weight would be significant.

    If you are worried about stiffness with 3mm, there would be no worries about applying extra ribs of 3mm ply at 3 ft intervals, or even 3mm ply stringers on the inside pressure points where you step in.

    The glass on the inside and outside, as previously suggested, would make the hull last a whole lot longer, and you could do an extra layer on the bottom of the hull.
     

  10. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    This may be too late if you've already built it but -

    For a kayak that "will mostly be used in small lagoons and lakes" 3mm is adequate especially with 6oz glass both sides - it's going to be able to take a lot of abuse, don't worry. The design helps: a short kayak doesn't get as much stress on it as a longer boat.

    The bottom planks are the only thing you need to worry about, and the Vee bottom of the Wood Duck reduces the bottom plank width which increases stiffness, as does the bottom "crease".

    My canoe is of similar size with 3mm ply and was never glassed, no dings, dents or damage after several years of use, just a little wear on the outside chines needs touching up. Kayaks and canoes light enough to tuck under one arm don't get knocked about when handling on land and there's no current in a lake or lagoon to smack you into a rock the way there is in whitewater or surf. Just don't sit directly on the bottom planks: add a seat or doubler.
     
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