Build a boat to sail around the world

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Capt_Teedge, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Cape George Cutters are wonderful voyaging boats and I have seen several go through Port Townsend on their way to far off places.
     
  2. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    HUH ? a non stop circumnavigation ?

    The last three quarters circumnavigation ,on a fast 80 ft boat, required 18 months. Better research sailing seasons. Circumnavigation ,Long distance cruising, implies many 1500 to 2500 mile passages .. ....IN SEASON....and would require three years on a small boat.

    I find the concept of muscling my way around the world and not stopping at the truly unique locations that only small craft may visit to be crazy.
    Best to rethink you mission.

    The boat you should choose will have a powerful sailplan and be able to make good daily runs in 8 to 10 knot reaching conditions.
     
  3. Capt_Teedge
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Capt_Teedge Junior Member

    I have researched sailing seasons and sailing routes. Later in life my wife and I plan on doing a one with a bunch of stops. I'm going to do a non stop because to me
    It would be like climbing everest. It's not exactly something that a lot of people have done. The reason I picked trimarans is due to speed in lifter winds. The Cross
    45R seems like a good pick for this I just don't know quite enought about that particular boat yet. It's not my original choice but that one is out of the picture.
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I dont know much about multihulls. What I observe is that most cruising multi hulls are underpowered and overweight. I also observe that multi hulls don't fit into ports and are as a result very difficult to handle.

    At present the toughest, safest, fastest, purpose built oceanic mono hull 40 footers are termed Class40

    http://class40.com/

    First generation boats by Group Finot are now on the market at reasonable cost.

    http://www.finot.com/bateaux/batproduction/structures/pogo12/pogo40.htm

    Pogo structures are builders and highly regarded..

    http://www.pogostructures.com/nos-bateaux-de-course/pogo-40s2/
     
  5. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    A trimaran of that size would be impossible to store all the provisions requires for such a trip.

    You need a much larger boat to store the food.
     
  6. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Sailing the 41' Piver designed Victress, in 1968-69 Nigel Tetley circumnavigated in 6 months....it was a record at the time, unfortunately she broke up shortly thereafter and Tetley was rescued.

    Today one would look at a Marples or Newick design to do the same voyage.
     
  7. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    The trouble with most typical multihulls (tri's with full buoyancy floats, and cats with wing cabins) is that they are limited in how much weight they can carry for two reasons:

    1.) They usually have slim hulls that don't have much Water Plane area, so they sink down noticeably under extra weight. This causes the wing deck/ cabin bottom to slam more in choppy conditions. And

    2.) the Initial stability goes up in direct proportion to the added weight. Though this may seem like a good thing, it is not. Along with this added initial stability comes higher rigging loads and higher loads on the Cross Beam structure(s). These structures were designed for a maximum load, plus a safety factor. By making the boat significantly heavier than the designer intended, you risk over stressing the structure, causing it to fail. This is true, by the way, for all Tri's and Cats, except single outriggers Proas (but not 'Harry Proas'(r)) and Tri's with 'low buoyancy floats'

    A Tri with low buoyancy floats is designed to push the leeward float under, when over pressed, instead of levering the main hull out of the water. For this reason, how much the main hull ends up weighing has little influence on initial stability, as the lee float will go under, before the main hull is lifted out of the water.

    With a Proa, the float is used as floating ballast. As it tries to heel, it tries to lift the windward float out of the water. if it succeeds, it is likely to capsize. If it fails, it continues to sail.

    With a single outrigger, the float acts sometimes as floating ballast and sometimes as a float, depending on which tack it's on. Almost always, it is designed so the float will either lift or go under, before the cross beam is over stressed.

    A 'Harry Proa'(r) is different. It's float is always to leeward and is full buoyancy, meaning it can lever the main hull out of the water. Therefore, the more the main hull weighs, the more stress is put on the cross beam. The designer suggests that after the main hull has reached a maximum weight, stores can be put in the larger float.

    If you're going to go with a conventional Tri, get one that it's designer says has the capacity to carry the load you will need.

    But first, get an accurate assessment of how much weight in gear and stores you are going to need to carry.
     
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  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    If I were designing a vessel for a non-stop go-around, it would be a 70', pretty plumb ends, 7 layers of 1/8" x 4" veneers all at alternating 45 degrees to the waterline, narrow slippery long-waterlined thing like a clipper ship, not too deep but well ballasted, with 3 large Chinese lug sails on stayed masts. This would cost $500k probably.
    The boat in the several photos here cost $15K for hull plus the same for rig and engine, so $30k. And is perfectly capable of circumnavigating as has been proven by the prototype.
    -
    I hate to point this out for the 15,000th time on these threads, but a cargo boat is required for very long distance voyaging unless you are sailing at over hull speed most of the time. A 60' racer can be loaded with stores for one person and still go fast if driven hard at all times. Anything shorter on the waterline with that much food and at least 100 gal of backup water for when the water maker breaks, will weigh a lot, so some experienced sailors have successfully opted for heavy boats that tolerate great weights well. A great deal of your sailing will be in light winds so something with a lot of sail area/ton is needed, which requires stability, which can be accomplished in various ways, one of which is old fashioned but works in all seas. This particular hull shape has such good inherent sailing balance that it easily is trimmed to go dead downwind with a lashed helm instead of a vane that can break. The stone-age simple gear is easily repaired at sea with basic materials, but is so strong repair is rarely needed.
    I know we all love the 20 knot sleds but they cost a great deal of $$ to build or buy, use very light weight modern materials again putting the cost of build and maintenance up and ease of repair, especially at sea, down.
    BERTIE, the SPRAY based vessel here, has such a strong hull she has literally destroyed a couple of docks, pulled down another's rig that got fouled, been on the beach many times for cheap paint jobs and otherwise has been a usable, trustworthy seagoing companion.
    If that were my intent, I'd try a single-handed non-stop in her as she steers herself almost all the time, can be reefed any number of panels in 90 seconds in any conditions, and we average 5 knots at sea most of the time.
    But I would much rather poke around the west coast of Vancouver Island and the San Juans and relax.
     

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  9. peterchech
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    peterchech Senior Member

    This is what I would build:

    [​IMG]

    http://store.devlinboat.com/peregrine36.aspx

    Or something similar.

    S&G = quicker construction (at least 10%) and probably cheaper too by a similar amount. 36' is enough boat to do most of what I would ever want to do.

    I would prefer a cat personally, but if building myself I know that any multihull will almost certainly:

    A: Take longer to build
    B: Be more expensive to build
    C: Have to be longer loa to get the same storage capacity. Being longer/bigger, it would cost even more and take even more time to build, not to mention cost more at haulout, marinas, for re-rigging (more SA), etc...
     
  10. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Good design, but I think not heavy enough displacement for the very large amount of stores required. S&G from Devlin is well-proven and economical. Remember, it's for a non-stop trip, so dock handling, fees etc don't apply, and length really is the way to get the speed and necessary displacement to carry the required stuff.
     
  11. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Another designer to consider is George Buehler.

    He has a fleet of relatively simple, single chine, long keel cutters he has designed over the years. They are relatively massively constructed and have modest Beam.

    They are designed for the home builder with ballast keels made of re-bar and concrete, so there is no need for smelting.

    His designs can be made of wood plank, plywood or steel construction, and to my eyes look really cool, in a work boat kind of way.

    For myself, I wouldn't have a voyaging sailboat that could not stand on its keel with, or without, side props, when the tide ran out.

    He has a 50 ft 36,000 lb design called 'Dragonfly', which has only an 11.5 ft Beam.

    Since the body plans of his single chine boats are made up of straight segments, it will probably be easier to fit an interior to them.

    I think he would love to work with you to semi customize one of his stock plans.
     
  12. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Wait a minute. The original poster has two missions...a rapid short handed circumnavigation while eating meals ready to eat from toothpaste tubes , then a cruise with the wife..
    To get around the world safely ,rapidly and in season you need a fast boat.

    The boats pictured are neither powerful or fast enough to work the seasons. .
     
  13. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I'm going to have to agree with Michael here.

    The OP should probably buy an appropriate "round the world race" boat for his toothpaste tube food and astronaut ice cream circumnavigation, sell it, THEN build the boat for the cruise with the wife.

    Really, if he does have those two goals in mind, it would make far more sense to use two different boats.
     
  14. pdwiley
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    OK coming back to this post, for a nonstop run that rules out going via the Panama Canal, unless your definition of 'nonstop' is different to mine.

    That implies a Southern Ocean circumnavigation.

    Forget about Michael's comments about needing a boat that can maintain speed in light winds. You need a boat that won't come apart in strong winds and seas. I know nothing about multihulls so I'm not going to comment on strength, fitness for purpose etc. Just, it does need to be well built if you're planning on the Southern Ocean route.

    I recently finished reading a book by Les Powles who did 3 circumnavigations, single-handed, in a 37' Roberts design f/g boat that he built himself. The 2nd circumnav was nonstop and took him 329 days, Lymington to Lymington via the Southern Ocean. I've got no idea where Michael gets his figures & times from but it sure isn't any of the literature published by people who've actually done it.

    PDW
     

  15. Capt_Teedge
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    Capt_Teedge Junior Member

    No I am not planning on going through any canal, panama canal or suez. I don't want to write a book about being taken by pirates. I do plan on sailing the southern ocean. I'm also
    Not worried about eating gormet meals. I want to build it for the satisfaction of building a boat and then sail it to climb my everest. I'm not trying to set any speed records, but I don't want to bob along for a year. Later on in life (I'm only 25) my wife and I will do our own sailing thing. It probably won't be in the same boat. So does anyone have any remarks about the Cross 45R or something similar to a crowther 38 I'm really not interested in a monohull. I've pretty much already ruled them out.
     
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