Build a boat to sail around the world

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Capt_Teedge, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. Capt_Teedge
    Joined: Feb 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: South Caroluna

    Capt_Teedge Junior Member

    Hi,
    Im rather new to boat building. I have built one small row boat (boy scouts) and done many boat repairs. I use to own a C&C 33 and a Lancer 30. Im looking for some suggestions on some boats I can build to gain experience prior to building a sailboat to do a solo circumnavigation. Now before you jump down my throat about how i dont know what im doing, I do have a 2nd mates unlimited license, 1600 master and a sailing endorsement so i know quite a bit from that side of things. Im just trying to gain experience before i build my boat for the trip. Im looking to start of rather easy and then build my self up from there. I also dont want something that will take years to build. thanks for your help.

    TJ
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. sabahcat
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 792
    Likes: 28, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 273
    Location: australia

    sabahcat Senior Member

    With the US market the way it is you will be far better off just buying something ready to go IMHO
     
  3. Capt_Teedge
    Joined: Feb 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: South Caroluna

    Capt_Teedge Junior Member

    Thanks, Ive thought about that quite a lot, but in my line of work i have a lot of time on my hands while home and would rather just build something.
     
  4. sabahcat
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 792
    Likes: 28, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 273
    Location: australia

    sabahcat Senior Member

    As do I but I can assure you that after several years of it I would much rather have bought and be actually out there using the boat.

    If the market was like this when I started I never would have started and would have several years of cruising under my belt instead.
     
  5. Capt_Teedge
    Joined: Feb 2012
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 25
    Location: South Caroluna

    Capt_Teedge Junior Member

    well, I spend about 6 months a year as it is now driving ships and have owned 2 cruisng boats and raced and cruised on many more. Im only 25 so ive got many years ahead of me hopefully. If i get the urge to buy a boat and go cruise while im building one i can do that. I just want something to build to gain experience.
     
  6. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    i think it would be easier if you select the plan you want and build it. bigger is usually easier to build than smaller, unless it was something useful like a tender for the larger boat. i think sabahcat has the right idea though.
     
  7. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 1,004
    Likes: 86, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 933
    Location: Hobart

    pdwiley Senior Member

    Fully agree. Building is all well & good, I've enjoyed it and learnt a lot along the way, but if the idea is to go cruising, go & buy a boat.

    PDW
     
  8. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,588
    Likes: 125, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Just for starters.. You should first think what building method you might prefer. To do that get some boatbuilding books and read all the possible boatbuilding sites and blocks you find.. my 2c
     
  9. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 440
    Likes: 41, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 215
    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    Consider starting from a bare hull. For instance, Cape George Cutters are available at any stage of construction, have a good reputation and comfortable motion at sea. Cascade Yachts build a literally bullet proof hull. Many good used hulls to use as a starting point as well.
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    If you are not going to buy used and you are not going with buying a bare hull... And have your heart set on building, my advice would be to build the boat you plan to cruise in immediately!

    Don't waste your time or energy building boats you don't want. Dive right in and build the real one. Once you get the hang of it, building a boat is just hard, mind numbing work. Once you understand the basics of your materials and type of build (no small feat), you just mindlessly go through the motions. There really isn't any challenge at all to it after the first huge set of hurdles.

    Just go for the boat you want from the start and do small parts in the beginning to practice.
     
  11. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Btw: Boats take 10 years because the builders are not on them full time. Expect 3 or 4 years of full time work.
     
  12. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,588
    Likes: 125, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Concur!
     
  13. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,770
    Likes: 189, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    I can think of few boats that will have the attributes you require for a round the world trip and be quick to build. It's amazing how your time gets sucked up by little things when building. For example on a friend's boat getting all the locker doors trued up and closing like they should took us two days of solid work. Now this was a cat so more lockers to attend to and I'm very particular about those types of jobs but you get the gist.

    If you were prepared to start with a simple hull already built to lockup stage you may be able to do a simple fitout in two years if you could put a lot of hours into it. There are so many variables it is really hard to say.

    If you approach boatbuilding as a chore it will be one, if instead you enjoy the process and the small victories along the way you can keep motivation up to finish the job.
     
  14. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 2,041
    Likes: 117, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1818
    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    Agree

    and another 2cents:-

    builidng the boat to a "floating" stage is one hurdle
    finishing the interior is sooooo much work that it's rediculous

    I am starting to think that the interior, electrics, cabinets, plumbing, and and and
    is almost as much work as building the hull and deck
     

  15. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    To sail around the world you need a boat in the 40 45ft class. If you look at the brokerage market you will see very many 15 year old professionally designed and built boats in this class. They are cheap.

    Something to remember is that when you go to sea and are seriuos, you need to carry the very best equipment , in first class order. . When you purchase used you need not commision and pay for a pro design , tool up, then waste 1000 of hours building. With a used boat you can dig right in, spend your precious budget of refitting the boat to ocean specs, then put to sea.

    A homebuilder can NEVER beat the cost and quality of a proffesionally built boat. NEVER

    When looking on the brokerage market search for the fastest boat in your price range. Speed is everything offshore. Dont be confused by this "Comfort index " often quoted.

    Racer Cruiser Yachts drawn by Frers, Peterson, Sparkman and Stevens are particularly well suited. If youre a spartan type, Modern designers like Finot and his 40ft Pogo's are also worth a look. Very fast, rugged boats that are no longer competive.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.