Buccaneer 28 Trimaran plans.

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Bigger - and Better

    :) That must be a very special Buc, I hope it goes to a good home. I can certainly see the advantage of the extra space on board, and it looks "better" than designed as a 33. Thanks for sharing the details.
    Bruce
     
  2. wiseolemule
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Brazil

    wiseolemule Junior Member

    Hi Bruce,

    Have read the threads about the Buc*8 about people wanting a set of plans.

    I ran across this and I'm sure others have seen it to

    http://trimaranproject.blogspot.com.au/ for Buc*8 plans. Click on that link and you will see Crowther's cover page and this is the link that has the PDF's that you can download. https://www.mediafire.com/folder/aaltgc3owsb1u//Buccaneer 28 I hope this helps, the PDF's are a bit faded and have not studied them enough to know they are sufficient to build with.

    I bought a set of Buc 24 plans from OldSailor7 but have decided she is too small for my purpose.

    Buc*8 seems more likely to fit my requirements. If I decide It is the one I need I too will be in the market for a full set of plans!

    The B-24 plans are For Sale if anyone is interested.

    Cheers,

    Ed:cool:
     
  3. oldsailor
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Sydney. Australia.

    oldsailor Junior Member

    We, that is my company Canadian Multihull Services, built the first B28, plus another for a client.
    Lock Crowther was in Toronto for the World Multihull Symposium, and together with Logan Apperley and my wife Jillian we launched the first B28 and literally sailed it to the starting line of its first race.
    This was an overnight race, on a triangular course on Lake Ontario, an inland sea. There were about 60 boats of all types in the race, which was put on by the CYRA. We were the first boat to finish and naturally we were first in the multihull class. The four of us eat and slept on the boat taking regular watches during the night. Lock was very pleased with his design. Jillian and I went on racing and cruising the B28 for another two years with great pleasure. It was the best boat I have ever owned. It broke my heart to sell her, but we had to as we were moving to Australia.
    I know that the B28 plans are available in PDF form, but I was not able to produce a useable set of plans from them. Perhaps I was doing something wrong, but I would love to hear if someone has actually produced
    a full size set of paper B28 plans that could be used to build the boat. :cool:
     
  4. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Size matters?

    Wom- and any one else still following :). I have "almost" finished rebuilding my "new" Buc 33 that I purchased over a year ago. (OS and friends built it originally around 1976? and it was ready for some TLC- I hope I have done it justice). I was really looking for a Buc 28, and could not find one here in the USA, and purchased the 33, knowing it would need a LOT of work. It has been a total rebuild, and I hope (and think) it will be worth the effort, but a 28 would still be my first choice. Unless you are planing on extended cruising, a 28 sized boat just makes more sense for most uses. Just an opinion, but a slightly updated Buc 28 would seem to be a very capable and practical size and a good design.
    B
     
  5. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Me . . :cool:

    Oh dear, good luck with the home stretch, and congratulations with the achievement in advance . . :)

    Maybe the below beam slide system is an idea for a slightly updated version of the Buc 24 or the 28 . . ? ? ?

    Saw this Astus 24 (sort of translation) where the port and starboard beams are just next to each other and can slide along each other to slide the amas in for berthing and trailering.... (see videos in the original link)

    [​IMG]

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    P.S. - I don't know how I should interpret this shot on the beams, maybe bias by a wide-angle lens . . :confused:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2015
  6. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    Kurt Hughes has a few designs with staggered beams like that, it's a smart way to go!


    Can't wait to see all the details on that 33, hope you took lots of pics.

    Barry
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Improvments?

    I have lots of pics, and more to come. Once I am launched, I will take some time and organize and share them. Right now I am up to my ears in last miniute details.:(
    The "problem" with using sliders for the Bucs, is basic- Bucs are all too wide. A 24 is 19' beam so the "half" beams are too wide to be legal to trailer, or they have to be very heavy to take the cantilever loads. I am not saying it couldn't work, but the engineering and construction would be a lot more complex than a basic Buc.
    B
     
  8. Neonhelm
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    Location: Neandertal

    Neonhelm Junior Member

    Not sailed it, but been on it and I found the width of these Beams in the middle of the cockpit quite annoying.
     
  9. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    Yeah your right! 4+4=8 add sleeves and containment and you just lost a foot of boat, twice!


    Barry
     
  10. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    redreuben redreuben

    Start an Astus thread :D
     
  11. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Good point, it distracts from the topic here, so here's a split off thread . . :)

    Further reactions on the "staggered beams ama slide in system" please on the new thread . . :idea:

    Sorry for the distraction . . :eek:
     
  12. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    Good news Friday
    We finally have the B28 plans good enough to ship printed sets.
    All available info is on fb page until I update plans page on website
    https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=212821925457790&_rdr
    Have a great weekend
    Regards
    Brooke and team Ezifold

     

    Attached Files:

  13. oldsailor
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Sydney. Australia.

    oldsailor Junior Member

    To all you Guys & Gals at Ezifold, Congrats on bringing the B28 back to life.
    Now, at last, all who wish to can build this standout trimaran with complete freedom. I can't exaggerate about how good this boat is for both cruising and racing. It needs no modifying, except perhaps adding a prodder instead of a spinnaker pole. The outboard is mounted on the transom with a stock lifting mount, as the spade rudder is underslung. The pivoting centerboard is a joy to use as it is controlled from the cockpit. A furling forestay with a plastic hoisting slide is recommended. Slab reefing of the main sail is also better than roller furling we found. The B28 is really good in handling rough water, but make sure you have very watertight hatches on the floats. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2015
  14. eladio
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: ARGENTINA

    eladio trimaran...

    Greetings friends!.
    I read completely this thread already has long forum.
    First of all, congratulate those who got their contributions to these plans become available.
    A "oldsailor", "Buzzman", "2far2drive", "is stalion", "Gary Baigent" and many others, Maximum greetings, as they gave life to this new boat for people who did not really know him.
    After exchanging emails with a gentleman from Canada (thomD), who told me to go for a smaller boat, I began to change my idea into a boat that could carry in a trailer, and off-season navigation, rest on my backyard.
    In this way to navigate soon, I buy a monohull. It is an excellent German Freers design, built in Could molded system...
    But I want a trimaran, and this is the time to build one.

    I can assure you exactly what I want, but I find it difficult to get an actual design that meets these desires, and end up thinking that this old Bucanner 28 could be right.

    The list of things I want seems very simple, but difficult to achieve in a single design.
    1-Light and very fast boat. (Not race)
    2-Minimalist interior.
    3- No complicated folding systems, simple aluminum beams are fine.
    4-Some capacity for ocean navigation, although most will be coastal.
    5-simplicity of construction
    6-Boat light.
    7-Daggerboard vertical slider, and kick up rudder.
    I would like to consult here, if this boat is fast, assuming that will be also equipped with good sails.
    And if it is justified today to build such an old design. (I could not find one)

    And as would do an update of the appendices dagger board and rudder .. (Maybe Gary Baigent, wants to contribute to a design)

    Cheers
    Eladio
     

  15. kaamaman
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: new york

    kaamaman Junior Member

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