Buccaneer 28 Trimaran plans.

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. Ooks
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia

    Ooks Ian

    Marmoset - that is the one in US I was looking at. Both boats list beam of 27ft?
    The US one is priced sharply and built from foam sandwich, but a long way from home for me. Playing with the idea of a multi stop delivery back here... Big commitment though and it is an awful long way away to make big financial commitments to. Fun to think on anyway. Noticed the Brazilian blog is from back in 2009, might be a long shot - but from the looks of the boats condition I can imagine the plans were kept in pretty good order.
     
  2. Ooks
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia

    Ooks Ian

    ahh just re-read thread - you were talking of a wider transom on the main hull... I see what you meant now. I like the look of the wider transom - looks more cruiser friendly.
     
  3. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    Yeah all across the board he did a nice job spicing up just the nooks and crannies a bit. Nice boat for sure. And yeah other ones not too shabby, and really other than being far away it's cheaper than building a 40 footer from scratch! Bet the cost and even paying someone to ship and or sail is still less than half.


    Barry
     
  4. Ooks
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia

    Ooks Ian

    I have continued looking for Buc 40 info and interestingly I think the Brazilian B40 must have been a slightly modified version - though apparently done by LC give the engineering sheets.
    I saw this other plan from the crowther catalogue posted by user Tad under Kraken 55 discussion. It shows the mast positioned further forward, almost on the forward beams, with a longer boom. Also the underhung rudder looks to be positioned much further aft on the Brazilian drawings, but not on the photos of the boat.
     

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  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    33 progress

    I am "almost" done with the second float (port). Finally! I had to dry out the ply deck before I could finish replacing the bulkheads, and it took two months with a fan plus a lot of sunshine. Yes, it would have been about as easy to have cut the deck off and started over- but I didn't know that when I started :mad:. It should be finished this week, and then I can get back to finishing the main hull.
    B
     

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  6. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    Those saddles look pretty even in height, those run pretty flat or is there angle built into top deck?

    Barry
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Tilt

    Barry, the floats are angled "about" 7 degrees and the decks are angled to match so they are level when mounted. I don't know if the wooden ones are built the same, but I expect they are. The 33 has straight beams, while the 24 has angled beams and even sided floats.
    For what it is worth, the beam saddles are the most rot prone areas on all the Bucs. All of the older boats I have ever seen had rot issues in the saddles, and while there may be simple solutions, as designed, they WILL rot. Beware!
    B
     
  8. rubyjeaan
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Klamath Falls, Oregon

    rubyjeaan Junior Member

    Would be very interested purchasing B28 plan set... Michael@ Alamo-45@hotmail.com
     
  9. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    Gotcha, so makes sense to add that part into the "should be made composite" column. I also gather the meeting of the fore and aft beams are rot prone as well, down in the valley's?



    Barry
     
  10. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    Hi Michael
    There is a downloadable set linked further back in here.
    If you still wanted a set after download then email us at inquire@ezifoldyachts.com
    Regards
    Toby and the team at Ezifold Yachts

     
  11. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    gravity

    Barry, there are several places on most all boats that can trap water, and if wood is in the area, it is likely to rot sooner or later. Many "fiberglass" production boats still use wood for bulkheads, floor structure and other places. They all rot too :mad: A local race boat lost a mast last month due to a rotted chain plate bulkhead, a very typical issue.
    On the Bucs I have inspected, the beam contact areas on the float saddles and the center sections allow water in but don't have any way for it to drain. The alloy/wood joints always move some, the finish and wood protection gets rubbed away, and water gets in with the usual results. The water stay exits on the main hull are also prone to movement and rot, but it is in area that is less important and not too hard to repair.
    I had to replace the rear beam mount cross timber on my 24 and all the float saddles. My 33 had several bad beam saddles and the alloy cross tubes had holes in the saddle contact areas. I have replaced all four tubes. Both boats are over 40 years old, but it was obvious that they both had repairs in the past in the same areas.
    All boats need regular inspection and repairs, but higher performance boats and multihulls need especially diligent attention. IMO, a Buc probably needs to be taken apart at least every three years or so, carefully inspected and all issues made right. The return for your time and money is a boat that could last almost forever. :) Both my Bucs, one wood, one glass and both over 40 years old are still going strong.
    B
     
  12. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    Yeah for sure, as they say, if ya wanna keep it ha gotta maintain it! I think this is also where box beams kinda speak for themselves since the dihedral can be engineered in without center valley problems.

    Barry
     
  13. threes_company
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Location: Auckland

    threes_company New Member

    Hey everyone,
    I've just spent two years doing up my Buccaneer 35' (33' + 2') with a view to some extensive cruising. Due to change of circumstances I have put her on the market. I am very keen to find someone who wants a great boat and will take her to the places I wanted too.

    If you know of anyone please ask them to check out http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=796834279 and https://www.facebook.com/NZ4196?ref=bookmarks and get in touch.

    Its not easy to part with a boat I have invested so much time in but she has to go, hopefully to a good home.

    Thanks
    Rory
     
  14. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Bigger Buc

    Rory, that is a nice looking Buc 33-35. I hope I can get mine back in that sort of shape, and I do understand it taking two years :( It is truly not fair that you are not going to get to take advantage of your work.
    Of interest to me, where is the two feet added to the boat, and how well does that galley arrangement work?
    Bruce
     

  15. threes_company
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Location: Auckland

    threes_company New Member

    From what I understand from the previous owner the two feet were added by moving every frame used in the build out by an inch or so. I've been on a Buc 33 and mine is just well, bigger. The differences between Threes Company and her are:
    • The cabin roof is slightly higher which means the setee is higher which makes the hull seem wider, the berths are longer. There is also more storage underneath.
    • The aft cabin is longer and has a single berth - the previous owner's kids used to play in there.
    • The inboard engine means access to the rear cabin is only by the outside hatch. With no need for height in the crawlway the sole of the cockpit can be lower giving standing headroom under the boom and decent legroom in the cockpit, no sitting with knees up to ears.
    • The galley is slightly smaller but this is not an issue. The sink is nearer the centre so doesn't slosh much, and the shelf above is very handy. It also hides any mess from view.
    • The only downside is that access to the storage over the wing means stretching over the stove, and there is no room for an oven.
    • The transom hung rudder can be lifted up - its also gives a handy step to climb on board. Its angled forward which makes it balanced with plenty of power.

    Although I'm sad to sell her I am looking forward to starting a new phase of my life on a small organic farm. I'll still be involved with sailing as I am a qualified Race Officer and intend to keep that up.
     
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