Buccaneer 28 Trimaran plans.

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    Here is a pic of the wire which holds up the outer edges of the wing nets.
    Please note it attaches to the bolt holding the wrapper plate fitting. If there is no wrapper plate strap then the assembly was not correctly built in the first place. The purpose of the wrapper strap is to transfer the load from the waterstay directly to the flat strap which connects it to the tube, via the thru bolt. IF it is not there, the flat strap will try to bend downwards and bear on the wood of the crossbeam supports which will eventually become worn down and fail. This is what happened to Bruce's B24 which has the same system, but whoever built it thought the wrapper strap fitting was un-necessary, and didn't incorporate it.



    [​IMG]

    Float under construction. Note the "Strongback is simply 2 x 4s fastened to the flat and level concrete floor. Legs formed by extensions of the frame side pieces hold up the frames to allow first the keel and then the side stringers and gunnels to be fitted. Once beveled the ply skins can then be
    attached. As per the building instructions.



    [​IMG]

    Here is the same float. Note the laminated and beveled stem.



    [​IMG]

    Here is the main hull on the strongback.
    Note the cabin structure is all built at the same time. You can't actually spot it, but the supporting members for the interior are also installed at this time.



    [​IMG]

    The cabin top.
    Note the organic and pleasing shape of the windows as Crowther originally designed them.

    ~
     
  2. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    tramp and straps

    OS is correct, the straps are important. Mine were left off at some point and have continued to cause issues. I will be fixing them this winter. I used dyneema instead of wire for the tramp edges this season and am very satisfied, it is easy to splice to size and I did not notice any stretch after they were first tightened. Great stuff:cool:
    Toofar, I used plastic float hatches last year when I rebuilt my float decks. I don't trust water sealing with light home built float hatches and metal framed ones are both heavy and very expensive. The float decks can be exposed to a LOT of fast moving water so the hatches have to be really tight. I am happy with the plastic Beckson, not so much with the plastimo. I recessed both a little to provide a somewhat protected and flat mounting area. I will get some pics up soon- I just finished pulling my boat out for the winter:(.
    Those are nice 28 pics OS!! Thanks. B
     
  3. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce is right. Dyneema is ideal for that purpose.
    Unfortunately it didn't exist when we built our 28s. :(
     
  4. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    In that last pic, note the cradles supporting the hulls.
    They are simply made from 5/8" ply cut out using the frame patterns suitably widened to allow for the thickness of the hull skins and padding. They support the hulls at frames 4 and 7. The padding is 5/8" PVC foam bonded to the edges of the ply with fillets of resin and phenolic microballoons. The supports are ordinary 2 X 4s. Cheap, easy and very effective. When the boat is finished they can be used to store the boat on land after haul out, during winter etc:
     
  5. farjoe
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    farjoe Senior Member

    @OS7

    re the first picture above, it seems that, between the wrapper strap, the flat strap for the waterstay( which seems to run all the way across the hull) and the beam strap itself, there is a lot of stainless steel directly in contact with aluminium in a very critical area of the beam. Is this healthy?
     
  6. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I never had any problem with it.
    But then all my alloy tubing was triple anodised, which I would highly recommend.The tube section is round and the strap is flat, so the contact area is very small. A coat of epoxy ---or even "Goop", on the feying surfaces
    would give protection. Crowther says to use Thiocol between all metal surfaces. But I don't know where you would get it.
     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    It's not only the straight straps for the waterstays that have contact but also the clamps arround the beams.

    Looking at Thiokol and this site he might have meant something like these polyurethane axle bushings . . ? ?

    [​IMG]

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    This one claims to be global.
    And here a serie, also claims to be global.
    Good luck!
    Angel
     
  10. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  11. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    polysulfide

    In the US, "Life Caulk" from Life Seal is the most common polysulfide brand available. Just don't use it on anything plastic.
    On my Buc 24, which was in salt water for over 25 years, the damage between the stainless and aluminum was minimal, and was worse where the cross beams were in contact with the wood saddles. My beams are just painted, not anodized and as long as the coatings stayed intact, there is no damage at all. I am sure they are good for at least another 25 years- good enough for me:). I do think that dismounting and inspecting a Buc every year or two should be considered as regular maintenance. These are lightly built high load machines exposed to really tuff conditions so some repair is to be expected. B
     
  12. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Well we are not having any luck with the B28 plans,--- but I still have one set of Buccaneer 24 plans left. $150.00 shipped.
    When they are gone there will be no more.
    PM me if interested. :D
     
  13. Marcos Henrique
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    Marcos Henrique Junior Member

    I'm interested in getting a set of B28 plans.
     
  14. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Lol Marcos.
    So are we all. :eek:
     

  15. 2far2drive
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    2far2drive Senior Member

    1 person likes this.
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