Buccaneer 24 Trimaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Samnz, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. jamez
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    jamez Senior Member

    Lots of farriers have roller reefing mains and many B24's have been updated with more 'modern' fractional rigs. There are pics here of SamNZ's boat on the site which show a fairly large square topped rig. This boat routinely beats 10 knots :) Maybe get some advice from a multi oriented rigger/sailmaker?
     
  2. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    If the B24 is built as per the plans, the roller reefing is standard.
    You can see it clearly in one of the sharper pics. :D

    The wooden plugs for joining the crossbeams were subsequently superceded by close fitting alloy tubes which were coated with epoxy to seal them against corrosion. All my Buccaneers had the alloy tubes,(including mast, boom and spinnaker pole), triple anodised. Costs very little more and is really worth while.
     
  3. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    If you study those pictures closely they will call up many questions.
    I am happy to answer them if I can.
    OS7 :D
     
  4. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    learn from the past

    Good pics OS7, Thanks. Sheen, depending on where you sail and your "need for speed" almost any more modern rig can be used. The fore triangle is about right as designed, but a somewhat taller-maybe rotating mast is easy and well worth while to adapt. Most of the racing owners have. Anything that works on a f-24 size boat is fine, the Buc 24 can carry a lot of sail. I had one reef in an oversize main and a small jib last week- 18-25kts, smaller lake size waves, two crew and saw around 6.5-7 kts pointing very high and an easy 10-12 kts reaching, (GPS verified) all with good control. Single handing, I would put in another reef which would make the main a little smaller than shown on the plans and I could cleat the main and use an autopilot:)
     
  5. sheen
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    sheen New Member

    Wow, Autopilots and rotating masts...

    I feel pretty inadequate. This boat attracted me because it looked cheap and fast (insert woman joke here) and you guys are talking about autopilots and rotating masts. This is neat stuff, but I'm very new to sailing and am more confident in my ability to build something than in my ability to sail it. The boat sounds like under good conditions it would hit 10 knots without getting real fancy/expensive rigs and might even perform at this level with a unskilled captain (me, under ideal conditions). My hope is that I can get a rig set up that is inexpensive, reliable, but still has most of the performance of the fancier stuff. I'm not really planning to race but like being on the water.
    The thing drawing me to the trimaran versus monohull is that I'm and engineer and a weighted keel just seems so inefficient. Also, I like the idea of being able to cling to the floating wreckage ...
    It sounds like maybe the right thing to do is implement the foresail as in the plans. The mast in the plans is an aluminum tube with bolt rope molding which seems uncommon and also roller reefing seems outdated. The boom is the same way. The few boats I've been on had regular fractional reefs in the sail. So my question to you guys is what specific mast, specific boom, and main sail to get? I found a web site that sells mast extrusions ( http://www.dwyermast.com/ ). Any of those look appropriate for mast and boom? Other recommendations? What about the gooseneck? Maybe another common modern boat that I could just copy the rig from? Thanks for the guidance.
    Dan
     
  6. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Sheen.
    Don't get your knickers on a knot about this boat before you address your main requirement. Being able to fold it and tow it to a launch ramp every time you want to go for a sail. The Buccaneer 24 won't do that. You can see from Bruces post that he estimates 3 hrs to take apart and on to a trailer.
    Even an easily folded boat like an F24 is still a pain to do that.
    I had a Crowther International 23, which I used to race every Wednesday afternoon. I kept it in a warehouse not far from the water. It had sliding beams which were a snip to slide out to the max beam. But the effort of towing it to the launching ramp, sliding it open, installing the decks, raising the mast and rigging,arranging all the running rigging sails etc: was just exhausting to do immediately before a race. Afterwards we had to reverse it all over again. A real pain.
    It's OK if you are going to rig up the boat for a long weekend for instance, but you have to take into account that assembly and demounting time at each end of the sailing spree.
    Even the little 4 berth Jarcat which I owned for three years was a pain--- and it was all in one non-folding piece, whch was trailer/legal. I finally gave up and put it on a mooring. I am not trying to put you off---but You have to make your own decision on this one.
     
  7. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    moving the boat

    Sheen, I really like my Buc 24, but I do not like getting it ready to trailer. I used to be a boat dealer, and I found that for most people, any boat that took more than 25 mins to set up/take down was not really trailable, just transportable. The boats just ended up sitting in a parking place most of the time. Even F24s don't "pass the test", and I am quite impressed with their engineering- it would be hard to do any better. I think that with attention to details and some custom work on my trailer, two motivated people could get my boat in/out in about two hours. Much of the time is spent messing with bolts, nuts and tramp lacing, and I am not sure how to speed that up. Not yet anyway:( A simple rig like you are interested in does help, and you might consider a boomless main. I had been using one that came with my boat and it was very simple and worked quite well. Full battens and lazy jacks made it really easy to reef. B
     

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  8. sheen
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    sheen New Member

    Trailering

    Thanks for you guidance! I am coming to the realization that the trailering/ set-up issue probably takes the Buc out of consideration. I have enjoyed studying the plans and the forum posts and have not completely ruled it out but I think it is a bit of a stretch for me to make it work. Any boats come to mind that are similar in design and performance that would be quicker to setup? I have thought about a small cat or a centerboard dingy, but where I'm at, winter is the prime sailing season and I like the idea of being able to stay somewhat dry. Maybe I'm back to the dreaded conventional monohull...
    Dan
     
  9. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    0
    A conventional monohull does not have to be a "Lead Mine". (Although whatever mono you get will be a "Leaner" :eek: )

    There are plenty of good small DIY centreboard monos available.
    A good and popular one by a NZ designer comes to mind---but I can't recall the name of it.

    Perhaps one of our NZ followers could oblige. :D
     
  10. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Buy USA

    :D Sheen, take a look at the L-7 from Multi Marine in California. It is very close to the Buc 24 in concept and is a real boat with support, not a CAD computer dream. It also slides together for transport:) Bruce
     
  11. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

  12. sheen
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    sheen New Member

    L-7 looked neat

    I went to the web site and checked out the L-7. Looked great. I also liked the looks of the Scarab 18 and 22. They all appear to trailer and set-up easily. Still would like to find out about the popular NZ monohull that oldsailor mentioned.
    Dan
     
  13. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Not this one by any chance? - that's a joke, although it had a huge number of hits on crew.org, local sailing site - but there is only one in existence.
     

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  14. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Good one Gary. Lol.

    But what is that interesting looking Tri in the background.???
    It appears to have only the two rudders on the outriggers---unless there is a main rudder hidden in a cassette on the mainhull. :?:
     

  15. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    GO BACK to post 224 for added information about the pics. :D
     
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