Buccaneer 24 Trimaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Samnz, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    For those who are building or sailing the Buccaneer 24 trimaran, go to new thread " Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum". Ask questions and swap ideas.
    OP7 :D
     
  2. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    THIS IS CRAZY.

    I can't believe the continuing interest in the little Buccaneer 24.
    I said I wasn't going to produce any more plans---but the pressure has been too great.

    It is not worth my while producing plans in less than five sets at a time.

    I have just produced five sets and only have three left.
    Any one else interested please PM me.

    On the difference between the Buc 24 and 28. There was not a lot of difference in the performance. The B24 was faster and more close winded to weather. The 28 had a greater advantage in rough seas due to its bigger size. It also (like the B24) was very fast in light wind conditions and loved fast close reaches with the flat cut assymetric spinnaker.
    Non of this sissy business of sailing with short handed crew to save weight.
    We sailed with three crew for afternoon races, four for day races and five for overnights. A very comfortable boat altogether.
    The B33 was not a very successful Tri in my opinion. We had one in our Toronto fleet and also a Kraken 33, but we could beat them in every race. Probably because they were built too heavy. They were longer, but had skinny hulls and the accomodations were no better than the 28.
     
  3. gpb
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    gpb Junior Member

    Hello Oldsailor
    this continues to puzzle me. Could you please tell me how long does it take to assemble the B24 from trailer to water?
     
  4. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Assembly time

    I have assembled mine in about 5hrs the first time (I had never seen it together) and about 2 1/2-3hrs the next few times with a helper. Take down is about the same. The last time I did it by myself in about 3hrs. I think I can add some quick-release fittings and improve on that. Lacing the tramps still takes too long. I had a similar size monohull that I used to do in under an hour, so there is still a lot of room for improvement- I am working on it. The Buc is half the weight of the old boat to trailer and twice as fast in the water, so there are rewards for the effort.:)
     
  5. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce is right. About three hours is a good ball park.
     
  6. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce.
    Have you fixed your "Droopy" forward crossbeam joints yet. ??? :eek:

    If so --how did you do it. ???
     
  7. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    crossbeam repair

    I found some aluminum pipe that is a close inside fit for the cross beams. I have only replaced one of the wooden plugs, but the boat is much stiffer now. I tried out a new large main yesterday- the boat loves it. Points high and goes fast:) 31.5' hoist and 12.6' foot with a medium large roach. I will get some pics next week. Os7, what sort of heavy air sails should the Buc have- 30-40kt conditions? B
     
  8. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce.
    The storm jib (shown in the table on sheet 6) is OK.

    The main can be reefed right down if you have the right reefing setup. The Buc will sail in extreme conditions on fully reefed mainsail alone.

    Looking forward to the pics. :)
     
  9. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I have found some B&W pics of my B24 and will try and get them up on this thread by the coming weekend. :D
     
  10. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Old pics

    I would enjoy seeing those 24 pics:) Also 28s or any others:) :) Did you build your 28 in Canada and if so, where did it end up? I am taking my boat out for the winter soon, and I will try to document the take down. B
     
  11. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce.
    Failed to get the B24 pics to post properly. Will try again in the next few days.

    I built two 28s in Toronto. The first one went to Florida in 1976 and the other (mine) was sold with my company to a guy called Skip Roncesvilles in Annapolis in late 1977. I have a nice picture of it packed up on a standard trailer, which you may already have in my Bote-Cote book. :D
     
  12. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    More to come

    Thanks, and yes I have seen that pic in your book:) A little off subject, but how long did it take to build the 28 as compared to the 24? It looks like much more boat. B
     
  13. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    About six months.
    We built two side by side, but the first one took priority. The second one was mine so it had to take second place to other income producing jobs. :(
     
  14. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Hope these pics come out OK. Buc 24 # 63.

    www.oldpilotsairport.com/boatimages.zip

    You will have to pick out the sharpest images if you want to download them.

    The best are:-
    (1_small.jpg) View from Fwd at the dock. Note the small forward windows for taking rough water and the simple SS pulpit with only two welds.
    (2_small.jpg) B24 sailing. five people on board plus rubber duckie. Imagine that with a taller mast and Fathead mainsail.
    (3_small.jpg) View in dock from astern. Note the simple combined mainsheet and traveller detail. Very effective for best sail trim.
    (4_small.jpg) View from above. Perforated decking very successful. Plenty of safe room for moving around and forward sitting area.
    I built the cabin with the Mk2 length but the Mk1 width. You can just see the jib sheet tracks down on the side catwalks next to the cabin sides. This enabled the narrower sheeting angle for the forsails, which together with the bigger daggerboard, made this boat so fast and closewinded on weather courses.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2009

  15. sheen
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    sheen New Member

    Old photos look neat

    Hi,
    I'm new to the forum and to sailing, but have been studying the Buc 24 posts. Your old photos are neat. The perforated plywood "spray deflectors" (shown in the last one) is a neat idea. I had a question about the aluminum tubes. In plans I have it shows being able to cut the tubes to allow for demounting. Others have mentioned play developing because the wooden plugs used to join the tube sections wear. Is this really that big a problem, or is the system as specified in the plans a good one? I could see how the plugs if neglected, could be bad but was hoping if the boat was maintained the plugs and tubes would allow many cycles of mounting/unmounting. I am still thinking about the design, because I will have to trailer the boat and rig each time I use it. It may be that the Buc 24 design is not really the right way to go given this limitation; however, the simplicity and performance of the design is sure attractive. Tough to imagine building anything cheaper that had higher performance. I'm coming from a background in power boating (40+ knot boat) so I can't stand the idea of getting a sailboat that can't potentially go at least 10 knots.
    The only other issue I have found is that the plans call out hardware that is no longer available. Particularly the mast and boom would need to changed. I was wondering what might be acceptable substitutions for the mast and boom hardware. Is a rolling boom reefing system still a reasonable way to go?
    Dan
     
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