Buccaneer 24 Trimaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Samnz, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

    Copied From 22-24ft tri Thread

    Quote Bruce

    There is a lot to learn from the "old 24", the basic design has stood the test of time well. My boat is still mostly stock and is boat for boat faster than any of the 24' corsairs in my area, (and most anything else under 35'), only a 31R Corsair and a Reynolds 33 are real competition, and then only when it blows- and I am working on that. Buc 24's and other ply boats can be built in about 600-800 hrs with relatively cheap materials, very little sanding, almost no equipment, and with reasonable upkeep can last a long time. Most new designs I see are glass/foam-glass construction, and glass is not a very good one-off material; the build time is way too long, the materials are very expensive and tend to be toxic in a small shop. I know from experience, I had a busy (and dusty) service department. Cutting edge purpose built race boats are nice (particularly if you have a good sponsor), and require the best and lightest construction, but are not justified for most sailors. Many of the new designs are prototype boats that would work fine with molds and production facilities but are not at all suited to a home builder. In my area, home-built glass boats don't have very much better re-sale value than wood, so any new design has to be a real breakthrough in design/performance/build time/cost before I! would undertake the project. I am getting older and I would rather sail than sand any day. As a boat dealer, I sailed on, surveyed, messed with and repaired quite a few different designs; the Buc 24 was on a very short list of boats that met my needs, I just wish I had purchased or built one 20yrs ago.
     
  2. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

  3. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

    BruceB
    Have you got any photos you could post of your boat?
    I will get some photos of my canting rig system tomorrow.
     
  4. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

    funny you should say that! A few people have gotten very upset when I beat them in such an old design!

    I have never heard of a Buccaneer 24 pitchpoling or even capsizing, I have come close so many times I wonder if its possible! Such a forgiving design, allways pops back up!
     
  5. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    How far can it go

    I just wondered what "almost" feels like. I haven't pushed my floats under yet- I guess I have sailed hobie 16's too long. If the bow dips, I am usually going for a swim. I will have a masthead reacher for next spring, I guess I will find out sooner or later. I didn't take any digital photos before I took my boat out for the season, I do have some pics that I will try to scan in. Thanks for all the help, even if we are sailing antiques, they are really fun. :cool: Bruce
     
  6. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

    mnn, I did such a big nosedive a few weeks back my mainsheet trimmer almost slid over the front beam! It was quite funny I thought.... Cant believe the rig stays up sometimes...

    How is your outboard attached? My bracket and motor got washed of and iv gotta rebuild it somehow that doesnt get in the way of the tiller and doesnt hit the water to much....
     
  7. aztek
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    aztek Junior Member

    :?:
    Hi
    Is this the trimaran you mean?
     
  8. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    motor mount

    Samnz, I am impressed:) , and your crew was a lot closer to the action;) this does increase my confidence in the boat. It is always nice when someone else "tries" it first. I have not been dragging my mount in the conditions I have been out in, but you sail in larger waves than I have yet. My motor has is an extra long shaft (25") so the mount is high. The motor has to be tilted all the way up- almost horizontal and turned over to one side to keep the tiller from hitting. Your tiller is a little lower than mine since I am still going over the traveler. My kick-up mount is attached and braced to a small extension aft of the crossbeam. Bruce
     

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  9. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    better pic of mount

    Here two better pics of the motor mount, and one of my open cockpit. I have a 48lbs 6hp, this is strong enough for it, I might brace it better for a bigger engine. Bruce
     

    Attached Files:

  10. tatoski
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    tatoski Junior Member

    Bruceb,

    Thanks for posting the pictures. Is the cockpit of the Bucc 24 self draining? I do not see any holes for water to drain. thank you.

    Tatoski
     
  11. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    drains

    My cockpit sole is about 6 inches above the water line and drains well- the holes are probably too small, (two front, two back) but it has not been a problem so far. My boat does not have a cabin, just an open cockpit between the crossbars. The forward part is stock, almost as as shown on the plans. Bruce
     
  12. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

    Thanks for that, I might copy it, but do you find a lot of water comes over the outboard when you are motoring without a fairing?

    When you say youv never buried the float, whats the most breeze youve sailed in? With my sail area in about 15 knots of breeze we are doing around 15 knots boat speed on a beam reach, and at around 18 knots it starts to bury, which I guess is about 18 knots of breeze (I have no wind gear just a GPS)...
     
  13. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    bow down trim

    Samnz, I haven't been motoring in waves over about 1.3 meters, I sail on an inland lake and it was summer, our light air season. Under power, I never noticed any water hit the motor head- it stayed clear or was blocked by the mount in my conditions. Sailing fast on a starboard reach some water does hit the mount, a fairing may be needed. I don't have wind instruments either, but in about 15kts on the beam, I have been using a small jib and a sort of flat main, and I am only getting about 12kts boat speed. I have been timid, this was my first season with the boat and I was usually sailing with one light crew. In gusts, the float would almost go down and I have been easing off the main. I would not have been competitive in your fleet:) The previous owner had "adjusted" the forward water stays so the bows of the floats are down several inches from the design position. It may be faster in light air like this, but it doesn't "pop" up and go like I think it should. My current rudder (not stock) is so short that I barely have control when the boat starts to go. I have lots of changes to do this winter, I hope most of them work.
     
  14. tatoski
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    tatoski Junior Member

    OB motor on the side

    I guess an OB motor mounted on the side will really be swamped compared to being mounted on the stern. The Farrier 22 that I've seen at Taal lake has its motor mounted on the transom. The catri has it mounted on the rudder! Even before the arrival of my Bucc study plans I am thinking of modifying the cockpit a bit to make it more open and to give space for the OB motor. Something like the current designs offer. I'll make it a point not change the underwater profile though.

    I've been reading about increasing the volume of the amas on the Bucc on the other thread by increasing the length to match the bow or even increasing the height of the amas. Is this to keep it from digging in and pitchpoling? Do you think this is necessary? I am planning to do coastal cruising and crossing to other islands mostly daysailing. Do I need to increase the volume of the amas? Thanks in advance.

    Regards,

    Tatoski
     

  15. Samnz
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    Samnz Senior Member

    The problem with moving the motor aft is the boat is allready fairly bow up/stern down and it would make it worse. When I go crusing I put the water container in the bow locker to try keep the boat trim.

    The floats how they are are very safe as they will sink under and the boat will round head to wind if overpowered. I have had many close moments when I think with bigger volume floats may have capzised! This is also why Farriers have small floats. However it would have a higher top speed and pitch less with longer floats, so I would stretch them to 7.5m if I were you but keep the rest of the measurements the same.
     
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