Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Without going to the plans to check I would say the Mk2 cabin is wider and longer. It takes about 200mm off the front of the cockpit. No big deal. The back of the cabin then overlaps the cockpit floor and makes a nice protected space to mount the compass. Both are laid out in the plans.

    I wanted my 24 for racing, so I built the cabin with the Mk2 length but the Mk1 width. This allowed for a narrower sheeting angle on the foresails to enable better windward ability. The sail track was through bolted to the walkway right along the cabin sides. Together with the bigger vertical CB this ensured the boat had superior windward ability. It is essential that the wetted area of the CB is 2% of the projected sail area, (fore triangle+main area). If you intend to use a Square Top or Fathead fully battened mainsail this makes a big difference.
    If you use the Mk2 cabin it gives you more room in the wing berths, but also causes more windage. No problem for cruising, but extra windage for racing.
    With the Mk2 cabin the jib track can be mounted on the cabin top, and a Genoa jib can be sheeted straight on to the winch on the cockpit coaming.
    Hope this helps. Paddy.
     
  2. Scot C
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Scot C Junior Member

    Great reply and clarification.
    Thanks.
     
  3. so_cal_sailor
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: so cal

    so_cal_sailor Junior Member

    ref post #995

    Thanks, Bruce. I have been cutting the frames close with a bandsaw, and trimming with a flush trim bit on the router.
    David
     
  4. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Oops!! I posted this in the wrong thread ---so here it is again.
    http://www.oldpilotsairport.com/2_print_crop.jpg
    My ##24 on lake Ontario.
    I used to race with an all girl crew.
    Girls who had come up from fast dinghy and off the beach cat racing had that
    "Killer Instinct" when it comes to winning races.
    Also they didn't argue with the skipper :eek:
    Don't you think the 24 has modern lines. :?:
     
  5. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I have now shipped 40 sets of #24 plans.
    The response on this thread is very disappointing.
    Surely there are more plans buyers who are building this boat.
    John Jolly and So_Cal seem to be the only ones who are reporting.
    Please guys. Make use of this thread and tell us how you are doing.
    We need more #24s on the water. :confused:
     
  6. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    Details of construction...

    Some photos showing details of construction of the panels. Notice the pieces of copper wire fixing the stringers while the epoxy cures.
     

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  7. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Great stuff Igenova.
    Don't rely on just the epoxy to hold those stringers.
    Turn the panels over and screw, ring nail or staple into the stringer thru the ply on a 4" (100mm) spacing.
     
  8. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Rather than metal fastenings, Igemova, I'd suggest you plane the stingers to soften the right angle sharp edges, then cove a thickened epoxy glue along the panel/stringer junction; lighter, neater, stronger.
     
  9. lgenova
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    lgenova Junior Member

    Oldsailor,
    On the first hull i used to do like that, but it was not ease to turn the panel over, keep the stringer in place and find the right place to staple exactly in the middle of stringer. But it was done.

    The copper wire is very thin and is removed after epoxy cure.

    Gary,
    Even planing the stringer, I did that, as the lenght is long, you need to make some pressure to ensure that the pieces are well glued.

    Any way, there are so many ways to do this job.
     
  10. lgenova
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    lgenova Junior Member

    This method applies only to the central spar. However, at the edges is necessary to use nails and glue.
     
  11. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Igenova.
    I was suggesting you put the nails/screws/staples etc: in after the glue had dried. A glued bond is only as strong as the underlying veneer of wood.
    We built nine "plywood on wood" frame multihulls using phosphor bronze staples with epoxy coated legs. The head of the staple bridges a whole bunch of wood fibres and distributes the holding power far better than a nail or screw. We used 5/16" wide staples, with varying leg lengths, to suit the job. Today gas powered hand held staplers are available to rent. The staples are driven in parallel to the grain of the 1st ply, but bridging the underlying core.The driving pressure should be adjusted to drive the staple so the head is flush with or slightly below the surface, but not crushing the underlying core layer. Galvanised steel staples are a No-No. They will rust. The staple heads can be filled with a dab of epoxy thickened with phenolic microballoons. A swipe with a putty knife and a light sanding makes a smooth job.
    Screws of course have to be bronze with countersunk heads, driven with great care so as not to cause "flaking" around the head. Ring nails are good, but it is almost impossible to hammer them in without denting the surface of the plywood. If you have pre coated the plywood with thin epoxy it helps a lot and reduces any need for excessive sanding. A properly executed plywood hull should only need "fairing sanding" on the chines, before applying glass tape with epoxy.
     
  12. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    lgenova Junior Member

    Details of construction...

    Ok, Oldsailor. Thanks for the information. I get it. This is the first time I build a boat, so my learning curve continues in a slight elevation, and this information is valuable to avoid rework.

    Below another picture that shows the building at the point where the chainplate is fixed. Still missing washers. The screws were placed to assist in setting the pieces while the glue dries. They will be removed before painting the hull.
     

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  13. lgenova
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    lgenova Junior Member

    And that is the terrible place where the buc will be placed in the sea...
     

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  14. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Hi Igenova.
    Good to see you using extra pieces of ply to help distribute the chain plate forces into the hull. When you drill the holes for the chain plate bolts, don't forget to epoxy the insides of the boltholes and let it cure before bolting them up. Don't be tempted to epoxy the chain plates to the hull skin either. They will move as they "Settle in " under load. Failure to seal around these highly stressed places will allow ingress of water into the edges of the ply over time resulting in the dreaded "Dry Rot". :eek:
    PS: That "Terrible Place" looks like paradise. :D
     

  15. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Nails too

    I also use some ring nails- they are more trouble, but they really hold well. I use a small nail installer used in the home siding trade. It helps set the nails without damaging the ply. B I liked the lake sailing pic OS, and your crew:cool:
     
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