Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Thats OK . I didn't mean to be sharp.
    I still think the extra stringer would be a good idea.
    A Kraken 40 had a nasty experience when the bow of the lee float was driven down about 10 ft below the surface----and the bow panels imploded. :eek:
     
  2. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    OK, oldsailor. Thanks for your suggestions. I added two extra reinforcement between panels in order to absorb the extra pressure created by the volume added to the float. I also took care to add a reinforcement in the area where the crossbeam is fixed.
     
  3. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Pics

    Nice pics, helps answer questions.
     
  4. so_cal_sailor
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: so cal

    so_cal_sailor Junior Member

    progress

    Well, I have a little stack of wood so far and am working on the daggerboard case. Another newbie question for you all: The two 1-1/4 x 1-1/4 at the bottom of the case are shown with a bend, 3/16" at the center. Are these meant to be held in the bent shape and glued to the ply, or should they be sawn to shape? I can put all of my weight (ok, only 150 lbs) on a 1-1/4 x 1-1/4 of this length and it deflects a little less than 1/4".
     

    Attached Files:

  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    curves

    so-cal, saw the curves where ever it is shown in the plans, the bottom of the trunk matches the hull bottom curve (rocker). The frames all have curved edges also. There are very few actual "straight" lines on the Buc. I usually cut close to the marked lines and then sand or plane the last bit. B
     
  6. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    trunk placement

    My new dagger trunk is progressing slowly. After an interesting chemistry experiment using a foam male mold, I went back to a marine ply trunk glassed inside and out. I am now ready to install.

    My question to the group:

    The forward end of the case opening is 12" aft of the main bulkhead. Should I move this forward?

    Best,
    Carl
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    trunk placement

    HH, Are you talking about the top or bottom of the trunk? The plans and my boat have the top of the angled trunk just behind the mast step and the bottom (opening) is aft of the bulkhead. I will have to measure to see how much. When I build/install a new trunk, I will not! use an angled trunk for several reasons. A straight vertical trunk set 4"-6" aft of the bulkhead/mast step would work much better. I also would make it at least 1.5" by 20" on the inside to allow a thicker board with some fore-aft adjustment. The boat sails better with the board forward and more vertical than the stock position. I think the rest of the Buc is well designed, but the board and rudder are obsolete and make a real difference. B
     
  8. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    new trunk location

    Bruce,
    I speak of the bottom of the trunk as the board will exit the hull. The trunk I removed was angled and ran forward to the bulkhead.

    I plan to install a vertical case, supported fore and aft on the top. I extended the length to 35" to avoid spray. The internal dimensions are 1.75"x16", which seemed to work well with my intended foil (0010).

    You indicated a board placement 6" aft of the bulkhead, does 6" really make that much of a difference? As far as I know the rudder, mast and rig is to spec.

    Best,
    Carl
     
  9. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    trunk position

    Carl, I am "guesstimating" the proper set back. If the trunk is too close to the mast base/bulkhead, the board interferes with the mast /support when it is all the way up. (I am assuming a longer board) When my board is down, I have the top rear cut away to allow the board to swing into an almost vertical position, but it is centered around a foot aft of the bulkhead because of the limit of the lower front edge of the stock trunk. My board has a 16" cord, so that puts the board front about 4" to 6" aft of the bulkhead. The boat isn't all that sensitive to board position- it still balances with the board forward or aft raked but I can tell the difference when racing other boats. The boat actually "feels" better with the board aft a bit, but it makes better VMG upwind in the forward position. If you are planing on adding more main-either height, a longer boom or square top, you will need the board a little aft about like mine. B
     
  10. Scot C
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: So Cal

    Scot C Junior Member

    Inboard rudder

    Question, Oldsailor: what is the draft of the inboard rudder which is the additional plan page you have? It doesn't have kick-up potential as drawn, or does it? Thank you.
     
  11. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    If you look at the 3 view back in this thread you can see the draft of the outboard rudder.
    The inboard rudder has the same draft but does not kick up. It has a very strong swivel/shaft design.
    My -24 had the outboard rudder with NO kick up feature. My-28 had the inboard rudder. I had no problems with either because I found I could nose into the beach without the rudder touching.
    Going aground on rocks is altogether another story. :eek:
     
  12. Scot C
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: So Cal

    Scot C Junior Member

    Many thanks. Along the same lines (no pun intended), if one were to build a B24 with a daggerboard as opposed to the CB, is there any clear guidance for that change? (Yes, I have been perusing a ton of these forum posts.) Thanks again.
     
  13. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    The -24 has a daggerboard as shown. It has been found that a vertical daggerboard is more effective than the one shown and can be made just as easily. The -28 has a pivoting CB, and the -24 can be made pivoting too if desired.
     
  14. Scot C
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: So Cal

    Scot C Junior Member

    Cloak and Daggerboard

    Thanks again. My mistake: without having purchased a plan set yet, I was under the assumption that the -24 was a CB boat. I had read that post about upwind a vertical blade was more efficient. Daggerboards are so much simpler to build, trunk included.
     

  15. Scot C
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: So Cal

    Scot C Junior Member

    Mk ?

    In these many posts I've heard about a MKI and MKII cabin. Are those things clarified on the plan set? If not, can we elaborate on the distinctions here?
    Thank you.
     
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