Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I think the internal cargos of strong Aussie suds lighten the load in many a hold.....Nice fine lines though !
     
  2. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Anybody who is even considering building one of Arthur Pivers designs has to understand that they are 1st Generation trimarans and are inconsistant with todays modern designs, in construction, safety and seagoing performance.
    Yes they did make ocean passages, but so did Wharrams 24ft Catamaran with a crew of three---but who would want to do that again today, when far better DIY designs are available.
    2nd generation designs started with Derek Kellsals "Toria" in 1966, when Piver was still alive. That kicked Piver into upgrading with his later rounded bilge designs. I met and talked with Piver. He had a real chip on his shoulder and resented anyone else who challenged his designs. That included Jim Brown who was his protege'.
    We are well into 3rd Gen designs today.
    Lock Crowthers designs from 1970 on can be considered as 3rd Gen designs because they were at the 'cutting edge" and well ahead of available designs at that time, both in plywood and foam sandwich construction. It's a crying shame that his designs are no longer available.
     
  3. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    We took a friend and his girlfriend cruising who owns one of the later rounded 36' Piver Darts, our Nicol had more ergonomic room. What surprised him was how much drier our boat was going through waves, the dart tended to throw sheets of spray forward. Nicols must be generation 2 as Hedley Nicol started designing them after encountering Pivers a few years before Toria. We do well against many gen 3 tris of similar size such as Marples, Cross, Horstman and Brown. Offwind the old Pivers can have a good turn of speed despite their boxy looks and can surprise newer boats if not overloaded. A bucc is much more of a racing overnighter than a cruising tri, A different class or "backpack" cruiser. Nothing wrong with either approach if you understand it. A backpack boat always needs to be light, a cruiser can be sailed either light for more performance or loaded for a longer haul but won't be as fast. Sort of the difference between having an apple in your pocket or being able to carry a box of oranges.
     
  4. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Cats loads are similar except they range from a apple in each pocket to a box of oranges in each arm. The sailors like Gary might contemplate carrying a raisin but would find the thought itself too heavy.
     
  5. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 99
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    frames

    Not finished with my other project yet but finally started this one today. I sat up the table in my study and laid out the frame outlines and cut them out. I had wanted to wait for the grandson to come back but was bored and aggravated so now I have a set of cardboard frames to transfer to ply. Bruce I see what you mean about the luan. I cut a piece of luan I had to put on my table. When I would trace out a frame I would use a scratching awl to punch marks for the stringers. The awl would sometimes go through the cardboard and I could feel hollow spots in the luan. It's full of them!
     
  6. charlesakeem
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Location: Will travel

    charlesakeem Junior Member

  7. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Nice

    We saw a boat very much like this in Mobile a few years ago. It was at a marine we looked at a Precision 27 at. Boat was being redone and looked huge compared to the monos.
     
  8. FuerteVentura
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Canary island

    FuerteVentura New Member

    Hi Oldsailor7,
    I live in Fuerteventura, Canary Island, and I would built a trimaran. I am carpenter and I have already been working with fiber glass; I have been looking at photos and plans of your Buccaneer 24 online and think it could be the best option for me.
    What do you advise? Are you still selling plans? How much are they now? I am really excited about the idea of building my own boat!!! Thank you in advance for you reply!!
     
  9. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Thanks FuerteVentura.
    Due to the undiminished interest in this Trimaran I am still making the plans available.
    Due to changes in international currency rates and the increase in postal costs, the price of a plans and information package is now $US 160.00 including P &P and PayPal fees.
    I note this is your first post in this thread. If you make 4 more posts, (I'm sure you have lots more questions), we can exchange information by Private Messaging, which is much more secure.
    I was Lock Crowthers partner and USA/Canadian agent for eleven years and so am available to give backup advice to anyone building one of his Trimarans.
     
  10. FuerteVentura
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Canary island

    FuerteVentura New Member

    Spanish laws

    Hi Oldsailor7,
    thanks for your reply! Nice to know that you still making the plans of the trimaran. At the moment I can not decide myself between the 24 and the 28, apart from the different size, is there any other difference in the contruction of the two hulls??? At the same time, I am trying to understand and discover the hundreds of laws, tests, certifications that I should present to make my boat legal hear in Spain! Had you ever sold plans to anyone esle in my country??
     
  11. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    At the present time the B28 plans are not available.
    No I have not shipped any B24 plans to Spain.
     
  12. peterchech
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: new jersey

    peterchech Senior Member

    Oldsailor I know the buc 24 is fine as designed, but I want to ask this anyway:

    Is there any reason the buc can't be bu in s&g? Instead of stringers at the chines, using an epoxy/glass join?

    If using 5-ply 6 mm could the stringers between the chines even be left out altogether?

    This would clean up the interior, save some weight and speed up the build time I imagine. Is there some structural reason this can't be done? Ie, the scarab 22 is foam panel but has no stringers I believe
     
  13. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    S&G vers stringers

    Peter, I don't know OS's opinion, but in mine, the whole boat would have to be re-designed, and would probably take longer to build. I have built a couple of smaller boats both ways, and done quite a few repairs on my Buc. I am quite convinced that S&G is way over-rated for boats the size and complexity of the Buc. Also, in the high stress areas forward and around the crossbeam bulkheads, the stringers distribute much of the loads. The forward stringers account for almost as much wood as the bottom panels where the boat gets narrow. My boat is built of 1/4" fir- not as strong as 6mm 5ply, but surprisingly close. I find it just about the minimum for trailering and beaching, with the stringers taking a lot of the loads- if I were building new, I would make the panels below the upper chine double 4mm and single 4mm above that and glass the main hull bottom up to the waterline. The stringers are glued on BEFORE the panels are attached to the frames and really go quickly, in my experience much quicker than drilling & lacing S&G. The floats would be too heavy in 6mm and definitely need the stringers in 4mm. Foam and glass, built KSS style, would probably be best and lightest for the floats, and much longer lasting- they are almost impossible to ventilate properly. With a light cabin, rig and fittings, it should total less than 1200lbs and be quite strong. I "think" I could build one closer to 1000lbs, but it would require some extra weight-saving details, cost more and take more time to build. B
     
  14. peterchech
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: new jersey

    peterchech Senior Member

    Thanks Bruce. I didn't know the stringers are put on ahead of time. That sounds like a S&G build method to me only with a chine log!

    Since the plans are in the air right now, and I just got permission to use an interior space for the build, I think I will be much more active on this forum in the next few months. I have gotten about halfway through this building thread, and I know there are a few others. I am reading about all the modifications made, and will be learning from everything. This is such a great resource I must say.

    Interesting what you say about the amas. What if I leave out the stringers but glass the 4mm inside and out? I imagine that would stop any potential for rot, and still cost much less than foam ($100 a sheet plus shipping is about the price I have seen)

    Did I mention I'm on a budget? ;)
     

  15. leecallen
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: Buffalo, NY (USA)

    leecallen Junior Member

    Hello B24 builders

    Hello everyone. I am absolutely new to boat-building (although my Dad and I built a little 10' dinghy when I was a kid). I have been doing some research the past few days and I am very interested in the B24. My boat needs to be multihull (at the insistence of the wife who cannot stand "tippy" monohulls), needs to be trailerable, and absolutely has to be easy to build.

    So here I am.

    But there is one huge question that determines whether this is practical for me, and that is, how much does it cost to build one?

    Can any one provide any guesstimates for builds in the U.S.? Ideally with and without rigging.

    Many thanks for any and all information.
     
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