Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    time

    Thanks for the luan advice, Bruceb told me the same thing.
     
  2. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Is the problem the Luan itself or the methods of bonding the plywood veneers together?
     
  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Your location Diego, ‘‘southeast’’ is that southeast USA..?

    If so, see this thread for plywood.

    (the northeast guy that asked is building in Florida)

    Good Luck!
    Angel
     
  4. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Its the poor adhesive.
     
  5. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    If you can't get it local bring it in, small cost in the overall budget and scheme of things. Quality hull and deck is fundamental, everything else can be unbolted or replaced but if the foundation is rotten you have wasted a lot of time and money, finishing and paint costs the same on crap as quality !
    Cheers,
    RR
     
  6. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 99
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 20
    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    southeast

    MS gulf coast. Kinda between Mobile and Pascagoula, Biloxi for the big city folks.
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,249
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    old epoxy

    OS7, you will be pleased - almost all the original epoxy coating (Boat Cote?) is still in good condition, and the paint stripper doesn't effect it. 35 years!- good stuff:). The frame attachments and the exterior coating are in very good condition. The fir ply has "checked" and cracked in places, but that is about the only damage. The repairs that the second owner made haven't held up as well. The epoxy (probably "west") has not stayed attached on much of the replaced deck. I don't blame the epoxy or the past owner, but the ply is not of the best quality and has separated from the epoxy/glass overcoat. It may have been prep or something in/on the ply. B _ I will post some pics soon_
     
  8. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce.
    I really am pleased. :D
    Bote-Cote Epoxy is still alive and well, unfortunately not in the USA.
    Like a lot of things which seem to develop in pairs, Bote-Cote and WEST epoxies surfaced at about the same time.
    After unsatisfactory experience with polyester resins, I began researching a better method of wooden boat skin coverings about 1966. After a lot of experimenting and with many fits, starts and dead ends, with paints, vinyls, polymers and tars we came up with Thin Epoxies which at that time only existed as thick solids used in dentistry. After one bad experience with a well known chemical company we finally had success and formulated an epoxy which had all the qualities we wanted and we registered its name as "Bote-Cote" in 1971.
    When we left Canada for Australia we sold the North American rights to "Bote-Cote" to an American. Unfortunately he turned out to be an incompetent businessman who soon disappeared over the event horizon. We established "Bote-Cote" in Australia and it is still successfully available from Boatcraft Pacific, in Brisbane, who have dealerships in all the Australian capital cities.
    Sorry for the long winded post, but I think you deserved an explanation.
     
  9. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    The hard part

    After some thought, much planing, and lots of dust, my floats are getting a-boards. My decks needed some repair, and I am also adding some bracing at the forward outer crossbeam attachment. The board trunks and bracing add about 12 lbs total each. Cutting a really odd looking hole in the bottom of a perfectly good hull takes some faith- I hope Gary is right! The boards are set at 2 degrees lift and 1 degree forward rake, and canted 15 degrees inboard. I will post as the project progresses. B
     

    Attached Files:

  10. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    newbie

    Being new to this stuff what will that do for your boat?
     
  11. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Hi Bruce, that daggerboard case looks very nicely made! A symetric shape and translucent by the look of it! tell us how you made it and some pictures of the daggerboards please.
     
  12. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Oh, the courage, the courage. Looks great, Bruce. But you do realize you've joined the crazies. Cutting asymmetric (not symmetric, JJ). always makes an odd looking hole, especially in the angled section of your float. Looking forward to hear your first sailing results - ps: you won't be disappointed.
     
  13. gypsy28
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 218
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    Location: NSW Australia

    gypsy28 Senior Member

    Looks great, cant wait to see the end result

    Can someone answer a question for me please on the use of foils in the floats, I understand the foil in the lee float is to give extra lift ? Would you still use the daggerboard in the main hull aswell ? Or will the float foil make the centre daggerboard obsolete ?

    Thanks
     
  14. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    -------
    It depends-like most things in design. You could design "T" foils for the ama where the vertical foil would develop enough lateral resistance and the horizontal foil the amount of lift you want( 60-70% of total weight for racing tri's). But then you can't fully retract the foils-which would be unnecessary drag in light air.
    You could use curved lifting foils in the ama that would provide the lift you want but probably not enough lateral resistance for the best upwind performance but they would be fully retractable. Also, sometimes the best place for the most lateral resistance is aft of the best place for lifting foils in the amas.
    Look at the difference in size between the daggerboard and the curved lifting foils on Banque Populaire* and the Sea Cart 26 and the placement of their relative areas. Note the angled straight boards in the Carbon 3 tri: they develop a little lift and a lot of lateral resistance hence no main daggerboard:
    * Sorry about the Banque Populaire photo it was the best I could find for the illustration I wanted to make.

    (click on image)
     

    Attached Files:


  15. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Thats a bit like asking "How long is a piece of string".
    It all depends how the boat is designed in the first place.

    If it is big enough to warrant boards in the floats which can be operated by mechanical means, then that might be enough.
    However I am a belt and braces man and in a smaller Tri I would like a dagger in the main hull also, as a safety factor for that black and filthy night when it is too dangerous to go outboard to adjust the angled boards.

    Please don't say "Just leave the boards down". I remember one foul night on lake Ontario when a multi had one of his leeboards down, and it ripped the skin right out of the hull. The boat was lost. :eek:
     
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