Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. Samnz
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Auckland

    Samnz Senior Member

    um as possibly the only person to break 2x rigs in a bucc 24 in 12 months, I would say def not! you need a pretty grunty rig, the righting moment of these boats is same as a 10m monohull!
     
  2. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    There you have it. Straight from the horses mouth. :D

    BTW. Whats wrong with the alloy tube as specified. I used 4.5' Dia tube on mine. Plenty strong enough---and I won races with it.
     
  3. Samnz
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Auckland

    Samnz Senior Member

    My Bucc 24 was 4mm ply on the main hull. The thing you need to keep in mind with a multihull is every kg of extra weight adds extra righting moment which adds strain to the beams, beam attachments and mast.
     
  4. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Whatever you do --changing specs--making modifications--it's imperative that you remember the motto of Clyde Cessna, the aircraft designer.
    He said:- "Simplicate and add less Weight". :D
     
  5. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    'Paul B MacCready'

    gossameralbatross.jpg
     
  6. Waterat
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Location: N/A

    Waterat Junior Member

    Hi John, I'm not happy with this design:-

    1. The 'Cabin' should be on top.

    2. You'll never get that prop, in the water.

    3. Someone has stolen your floats.:p:p

    Beat Regards, :D:p:D
     
  7. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 99
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Hello all

    For some reason I haven't been getting notified of posts here and have missed quite a few. On the homefront I completed the wiring in my current project to the point of starting the engine. Runs great and sounds better, love those BB V8s. This means I'm also one step closer to starting the buc. My brother has acces to cnc plasma cutters so he took a copy of some of the plans to start putting things together like the mast top, various tangs ect.

    Found an old Spirit 28 sailboat thats permantlely grounded that I may be able to get the mast, rigging wicches ect off of. Should know this weekend. If not I'll just build it as per plans with my brothers help.

    Out to start on the car. I'm supposed to have the windshield replaced today. Wife broke it with a vacum cleaner, not what you think though.:rolleyes:
     
  8. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Trailer sailors account for a large population of the boats that we use. Most of us will winter our boats at home for maintenance and/or to save on marina costs etc - this might be interesting and of use to UK Trailer sailors.

    Here is the UK rules and regulations for Towing in the United Kingdom.

    scan0001.jpg
     
  9. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Plywood

    Looks like the only marine ply I can find locally is douglas fir. I have read where a lot of folks think this is too heavy. Only other thing I've found is Luan. Local guy said there wern't any voids in it.

    I also have a question about the sizes called for in the plans. 3/16 is called for in the plans but no one carries 3/16 but if you measure the 1/4 its actually 3/16. Kinda like our 2x4 aren't really 2"X4". Do the plans call for the actual thickness?
     
  10. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    D.K.
    Lots of B24s have been built in Douglas Fir, Bruces for one. The fact that 1/4 really is 3/16, is quite ok.
    Just be aware that Douglas Fir,(Oregan), although very strong, rots quickly in fresh water unless it is totally encapsulated in epoxy.
    No problems in sea water, except that rain water has a horrible habit of finding it's way into the bilges. :eek:
    Whatever epoxy you use make sure you have three coats on the outside and in the bilges, two coats inside and F/glass tape epoxied on all the seams.
    Fibreglassing the whole outside of the boat does NOT give you any more strength, only resistance to scuffing. In my opinion it's not worth the weight and extra cost.
    Only once did I have any damage which went into the surface of the wood. That was easily fixed with a bit of thickened epoxy trowelled in and a dab of paint.
    Luan ply is good too, providing it is not too expensive. It is lighter than Oregan.
     
  11. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    paint removal

    :( This is an experiment to see if posting here gets the paint off my boat any faster:D I have 35 years worth of paint to remove- a first layer of epoxy (probably what OS7 sold in 1974-and it is still good!) as a base and then a filler coat with a marine epoxy paint, then 2-3 layers of enamel. The enamel bubbles up a doesn't let the stripper get to the first paint (epoxy) layer, and it all needs to come off. I managed to strip and sand about 12 square feet in 5 hours- and each float has about 106 feet of area, plus the main hull. Anybody have any magic methods? I have stripped a lot of paint, but this is the toughest I have tried. B
     
  12. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    You might try wrapping the area you paint with paint stripper in glad wrap it prevents the stripper from drying out and you get a bit more paint removed each time.
     
  13. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Keep trying

    Thanks Corley, I already tried that. I haven't tried a heat gun, and would prefer not to as at least the first epoxy paint layer seems to have lead in it. I am using "Klean Strip" and have one other brand to try tomorrow. So far, it has taken three coats/scraping followed by 40 grit on my sander- and I still have to prep sand and fair before I can re-paint. B
     
  14. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce.
    Did your paint remover attack the underlying, (original), coat of epoxy, or did it leave it intact. :?:
     

  15. spenance
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Hammondsport, NY

    spenance Junior Member

    Dont expect more than 10 years out of luan ply before it delaminates
     
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