Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    danskram Junior Member

    Bruceb, I'm not replacing any of the frames (bulkheads) they will all be install per specs
     
  2. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    danskram
    The 3/4" thick X 2' 3/4" width wood framing for the bulkheads of the three hulls is the skeleton of the boat, add the 1/4" ply to the frames and the 1/4" ply skins to the hulls and you have a very strong 1" x 3" skeletal structure - the 9mm (3/8" ply) without wood edge framing is the wrong road to go down - you may get away with this type build practice sailing on a large inland lake, just! The open sea is a completely different story and can be a harsh enviroment! - in my opion the boat would start to disintegrate on its first sea trial!
    I would stick adamantly to the design plans and instructions.
     
  3. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    redreuben redreuben

    If you are concerned about rot under the stringers, run them through a table saw to cut a bevel on the top edge so water drains off rather than pooling.
     
  4. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    Speaking of stringers, what would be a suitable substitute for the oregan (douglas fir), here in Australia, Meranti is of dubious quality in my mind, Western Red Cedar? Hoop Pine might be heavy, Paulownia too light, Huon Pine too expensive !
     
  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    ply choice

    I am not so sure that the boat will come apart, but the load paths in the Buc do depend on the frame. 3/8" ply is used in some power boats with good success, but most of the designs I am aware of also use a lot of glass to encapsulate, stiffen and join the skins- a very expensive and labor intensive project. Just increasing the ply thickness does protect some from impact damage, but without the frame to distribute the sailing loads, the whole boat will probably be much weaker and the seams more likely to split open. (The thicker ply "point" loads the seams more) If you are using a non-durable ply (pine for instance) the glue may be fine, but the wood its self will deteriorate quickly. I just removed some 3/8 from my float decks by sticking my hand through it and pulling it off- and I didn't hurt myself. The glue was still good, but the pine ply is not stable enough in wet conditions to keep the water out- and then can rot in one season. I have seen it happen many times. Marine fir ply is about the minimum quality that will hold up on a light structure, and the specialty panels are MUCH better.
     
  6. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Dan.
    If you are going to butt plate your hull side joints, you have to attach the gunwhale strakes, chine logs and intermediate stringers first, before you epoxy in the butt plates. Otherwise you are going to have real problems later, when you come to install those items.
    Also 9mm ply is 50% heavier than 6mm ply and will really affect the boats ability to carry a payload , or performance, or Both :eek:
    Many B24s were built from 4mm ply with no problems..
    As far as using stitch and glue at the chines, you still have to have a stringer in the middle of each panel, so there is NO real weight saving advantage, but there IS more building complication. The B24 is a Buccaneer---not a Searunner and Lock Crowther was a world class designer who knew what he was doing.
    I strongly urge you to build the boat exactly as it is designed, and in accordance with the building instructions, if you want a successful boat.
    Sorry to be so firm. But I am simply telling it as it is. :D
     
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  7. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    The recommended woods for the stringers and longerons are specified in the materials list accompanying the building instructions. They say Oregan or Pine.
    However you should ask around the wooden boatbuilders in your area and take their advice. The locality always makes the difference.
     
  8. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    danskram Junior Member

    Thanks everyone for your much needed advice, I will follow the blueprints and building instructions as per your advice. Dan
     
  9. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    John.
    This post puzzled me quite a lot, until I got out my set of plans and looked at them.

    All the bearers should be the same width as the crossbeam tubes they support.

    With Locks approval I used 4 1/2" tubing instead of the 4 3/4" tubes specified.
    I altered this on the plans as you have seen and this accounts for the error.
    TO ALL B24 BUILDERS. The crossbeam supports and compression struts should be the same width as the alloy tubes you are using. Providing you retain the same wall thickness, 4 1/2" tubing is OK. For simplicities sake Lock made the mast of the same tubing, with a riveted on sail track, as it costs a lot less than an extruded mast section and does the same job.
    A teardrop sectioned rotating mast is a whole new ball game. :eek:
     
  10. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Hey people, would a Tornado catamaran rig work on the Bucc, same height as standard rig ? If not what would be available in Australia on the second hand market ?

    Cheers,
    RR
     
  11. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    The Tornado rig would possibly work OK on a B24, except that the mast is designed to bend under pressure, allowing the top of the sail to sag off to lee and relese the pressure in a gust..
    This means the Tornado mast should only be used with a Tornado sail. The B24 would have to be constructed very light, so as not to put too much pressure on the rig. The B24 has a greater resistance to heeling than a Tornado.:eek:
    I would say a case for "Suck it and see". ;)
     
  12. kaamaman
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    kaamaman Junior Member

    Last edited: Mar 1, 2011
  13. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    Kaamaman, nice one, point taken !

    RR
     
  14. rattus
    Joined: Feb 2008
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    rattus Se├▒or Member

    Redreuben, you may have to make dimensional changes when substituting stringer materials. Douglas Fir (Oregon) is one of the strongest softwoods in existence; according to softwood.org, "In strength properties, Douglas fir has the highest ratings of any western softwood for extreme fiber stress in bending; tension parallel-to-grain; horizontal shear; compression perpendicular-to-grain and compression parallel-to-grain."

    I think the closest species around your parts would be Radiata Pine.

    Mike
     

  15. Samnz
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Auckland

    Samnz Senior Member

    what about yellow cedar? thats what im using in my new boat.

    Red cedar is to soft
     
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