Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    " a modern fractional rig will transform this boat to a more responsive, more enjoyable boat to sail."

    John, I quite agree.
    But.
    A good fractional rig is dependent on a good sized mainsail. Ideally a fully battened fathead one.

    Fixed backstays not only limit the length of the boom, they limit the use of a high aspect ratio fathead sail.

    Hence the backstays going out to the floats, adjacent to the ends of the rear crossbeams, which puts them out of the way of the mainsail leech, and also supports the tension on the water stays.

    Lock knew what he was doing. :D
     
  2. Samnz
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Auckland

    Samnz Senior Member

    A modern fractional rig?

    you mean a keel boat rig with a pinhead main and permanent ajustable backstays? please tell me thats not your plan?

    My Bucc had masthead running backstays just to stop the masthead kite snapping the mast, never used them upwind to depower the main, the carbon squarehead main did it itself in the gusts.

    My runners just went to a spectra webbing loop around the back beam, simple, light and strong.

    I would never use a Chinese padeye on a boat. Make sure its made in France or USA!
     
  3. Samnz
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Auckland

    Samnz Senior Member

    Nice vid

    made me think of one of my prevoulys owned Bucc, didnt quite have the same sort of production team as you, just my brother with a handicam that i dropped off on a moored boat for a 5 mins to get some off the boat footage, the big RIB wasnt involved it was just the Team NZ guys saying hi.

    The boat was only partially finished (one of the first outings) in the vid, no tramps and still on the 1st (shorter) mast.

    Whole vid took an hour to film, wasnt much breeze believe it or not!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-lgC4WBk6Y
     
  4. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Hey guys, my boat will have backstays outboard of the floats as Crowther's design, you are right, I am wrong, to many years of me playing around with mono hulls, will try and put my thinking hat on next time before I open my big mouth.
     
  5. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Ive just been looking at one of Bruce's pictures of his B24, no cabin but what a lovely looking boat, it does look purpose-full and ready for the start line - I like this picture so much Ive made it my screen saver - this picture alone should be enough to encourage someone to get a new build going! Bruce out of interest how do you open the deck hatch, most are locked from inside.

    buc24122009%20012.jpg
     
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  6. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    This one you can enlarge....... buc24122009%20012.jpg
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Fold the Buc III

    Thanks John-and good eyes. I have rigged an internal rope tie down/release for the hatch, and "most" of the time I remember to tie it down. I have posted pics of my full scale folding model- still a few details, but I think it will work. The next test will be on the boat:) B
     

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  8. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    OS, there is a small mistake on the plans, other builders of the Buc will probably pic it up, but I will bring it to your attention.

    Sheet 2, Frames 4 & 7 which fasten to 4A & 7A
    Vertical hardwood bearers which support the waterstays read:........................ 4' 3/4" X 1' 3/4" inch

    Should read 4' 1/2" X 1' 3/4" inch

    Hope this helps.................:D
     
  9. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Buc repairs and float dagger boards

    I am replacing the float decks in between the cross beams mounts. (about 10 feet on each float.) A repair sometime in the past used 3/8" pine non-marine ply for the decks and is heavy and starting to rot. The ply was well epoxied and covered in glass, but water still got to it and it is now junk. Pine "big box" ply is NOT a marine material! Since the hulls are open, I am adding angled dagger trunks. Gary should be pleased:D I will be posting pics and details, and would appreciate comments. B
     
  10. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: USA

    danskram Junior Member

    Old Sailor

    Sorry I haven't posted since I bought the plans but I've been real busy trying to get everthing lined up to start.....I've started my Buc, but have had a few side trips along the way. Here are a few pics. 1st pic left to right top, plywood purchased. 2nd pic had to tear out part of the garage to build the boat. 3rd and 4th pic had to build a carport for the wife's car. 5th, made a work table. 6th cut out sides of main hull and attached with butt blocks. 7th cut out bulkheads. more pics to come. Oh yes, most importantly..the plans are excellent. I've studied others, more modern plans and in my humble opinion, Lock Crowthers was a genuis. Any of you guys out there that have bought these plans and are hesitating to start your dream because it looks too complicated, take my advice and take the first step. Don't worry about the ins, ands, or buts, just do it! Take one step at a time, if you make a mistake, you can always fix it. Fiberglass and Epoxy will fix anything. Dan
     

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  11. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Next?

    Nice start- and that shop looks big enough to build something bigger next? B
     
  12. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: USA

    danskram Junior Member

    More pics

    Thanks Bruce...I noticed that you're still working on those beams. Since I will be trailering back and forth to water, I'm going to need a quick and easy way to get set up to sail. I can't spend 3 hrs getting everything ready to sail plus 3 hrs to dismantle. I'm also thinking of a hinged beam that would store the floats under the wings of the main hull. Have you seen the new trimarans from Jim Brown, Seaclippers 20 and 24 foot. The floats swivel on pins and mount under the wings for trailering. Looks like a good idea but it looks kind of flimsy on the 20 footer video I saw. Also why do trimarans seem to sit low in the water, seems if they floated higher they would be faster. Anyway here are some more pics. I tore out a back room and lowered the floor and extended it to 24 feet. I had to add a wood stove to keep from freezing this winter. I cut out more hull sides, going to try the Epoxy fiberglass butt joint on these. I'm going to try using epoxy on my Buc like a stitch and glue boat. Like for all the seams instead of wood, and to bind the bulkheads to the hull sides and bottoms. Never used fiberglass or epoxy before and I keep procrastinating. I've always used wood and wood glue and fasteners to build everything up till now. But I thought I might as well use the latest technology if I can.
     

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  13. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: USA

    danskram Junior Member

    BruceB

    That barn was originally built back in early 1990's, 24 wide x 36 deep. I was gonna build a 33ft Bruce Roberts design "The Spray" based on Joshua Slocums boat. But......I went to California on a business trip and saw those big tankers coming in and going out of Los Angeles, and I thought they would run over me the first time I took it out. I've never lived by the ocean but I always dreamed of sailing to tropical Islands. I traveled to the virgin Islands once by plane and thought it would be great to sail down the Ohio river to the Mississippi to the Gulf and on to the Islands. I doubt if I'll ever make that trip now. Just getting my Buc built and on the lakes nearby will be a great start. I'm building this Trimaran for cruising, and comfortable sailing on weekends and vacations. Speed is not a major concern. I doubt if I ever race her. But I will know her top speed before I'm done.....later, Dan
     
  14. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    progress

    It looks as if you are doing fine on your build. I don't quite understand what you are replacing with stitch& glue? The fore & aft framing is an important part of the structure of the Buc. In the fore and aft part of the boat , the inner framing makes up almost as much as the ply skin, and stiffens the mid-section panels. The framing is pre-glued to the skins and helps maintain the proper curve to the ply. Crowther's building instructions are as important to an economical build as the basic designs, and the 24 is a real marvel in minimalist effort and material. I have built several different methods, and the Buc 24 is the quickest for the end product that I have tried. I will update on my folding system in a couple of weeks- right now I am doing float repairs and mods. B
     

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  15. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Location: USA

    danskram Junior Member

    Bruceb

    I had to use 9mm instead of 1/4" plywood for the main hull panels and the panels are a lot stiffer. I could use the wood stringers,battens and chines as specified, but since the panels are a lot stiffer I thought I could save a little weight using epoxy seams and forget the wood batten, stringers and chines. I've read that most of the rot damage in boats comes from the wood joints in the chines and wood framing. Am I wrong? This plywood is really good stuff, waterproof glue lines....I boiled samples then put them in the dishwasher, then froze them 1hr for each cycle and ran them thru 3 cycles none of it delaminated. I tried doing the same with other plywood even marine 1088 and they all delaminated. There are no voids in any of the plywood that I've cut so far..... I also thought stiffer would hold up better in the river and lakes around here, because of the logs, tree stumps, concrete piers under the water etc etc, plus pulling the boat in and out of the water year around, wear and tear all that stuff......I've got 1/4 " ply for the floats and float frames...but I would have to invest another 500 to 600 dollars to get more 1/4" plywood. I need your advice on this. I've built houses and barns but no boats. Read all the books from Payton, Devlin, Jim Michalak, Jim Brown, Reuel Parker,Robert Steward, The Gougeon Brothers, Hub Miller and George Buehler and read all the forums and websites on boat building. But if this won't work tell me now before I invest more money. And if I use the 9mm for the main hull how will that affect the performance????
     
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