Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,097
    Likes: 40, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 436
    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I've shipped 32 sets of Buccaneer 24 plans-----but have not heard of even one of them finishing one yet.
    Come on you guys. We all want to see the results of your labours.
    How about posting something-----anything.
    John is the only one currently. :rolleyes:

    If I can build one in six weeks, and have it sailing in nine weeks ---------so can you.
     
  2. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 116
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 61
    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    I second OS - I just cant understand why so many of you guys have purchased plans and are not building.

    My reasons were quite simple, "I wanted a Trimaran" it had to be able to overnight a minimum of two people (three in the Buc's case) and for that matter 'spend a week on board' away from home in resonable comfort, I wanted to build in wood, not composite materials, and it had to be fast (over the water) within the boundaries of a wood built boat - if you read previous posts on this boat we know it is no slouch.

    Research soon made me realise that plans for a modern Trimaran with a main hull length of around 24ft were going to cost £400 - £700 and at the end of day non of these other designs were going to give me any better performance for my brief - if you compare the price of Buc24 plans with the above you dont have to be a mathematician to work out how much timber etc one can buy with the savings.

    This is not a folding Trimaran (so what!) it can be dismantled, the beauty of this boat is yet to come, which I hope to show you with just one or two cosmetic changes - its a cracking good boat to build, well designed and at low cost, hope my little blog gets you fired up to start building, it would be nice to share this forum with other builders - so guys get to it, there is plenty of help and advice on hand from OS, Bruce, other owners of Buc24's and contributors - thanks to one and all.

    That's my two pennies worth.......
     
  3. DarthCluin
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 131
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    DarthCluin Senior Member

    In Tom Jones book "New Plywood Boats", Jim Wharram is quoted as saying that for every three sets of plans he sold, one boat was built. Wharram plans while not unreasonable, are not cheap. $150 for a set of Buccaneer 24 plans is cheap. While I bought my plans from a fellow in Atlanta (mostly because ebay is easy), I suspect many of us bought them because we might build the boat and we wanted to get the plans while we could.
    You might find this discussion interesting:
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/archive/index.php/t-11951.html

    Currently I'm building a Dierking Wa'apa trimaran. When that is done, what I build next mostly depends on the and my economy.
     

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  4. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 46
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    hey, wait. Here some photos. Before start I had to build a tent. That is our beach house. It is 120 Km far from our city house. So only some weekends to work on construction. Scarfing is not easy. You can destroy expensive marine plywood if you drink some cans of beer:D. Some more photos coming soon.
     

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  5. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,097
    Likes: 40, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 436
    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Lookin' good Igenova.
    Scarfing is the way to go providing it is done properly.
    If anyone is in doubt of their expertise, butt joints backed by pieces of skin ply 4"(100mm) wide are perfectly good if done with epoxy.
    However scarfed joints ARE neater and lighter. :cool:
     
  6. harryjak
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Juneau Alaska

    harryjak Junior Member

    I bought the plans from Patrick because I am interested in building a small cruising Trimaran and I wanted to get these plans while I could. I also have the plans for the K24T. I am blessed with a shop, my house was designed around a 24X32 boat shop and I have high quality local lumber. I have a bunch of yellow cedar for the longitudinals as well as clear VG spruce. I haven't started building anything yet, I had hoped to build amas this winter but I am way to involved in other projects.

    I still haven't decided which boat to build either. If I build the K24 I am going to stretch it to 26. Some model building will decide me which way to go.
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,232
    Likes: 42, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Half scale

    I am still fine tuning geometry, but this model helped. I am now building a full scale mock-up. B
     

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  8. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 116
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 61
    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Bruce, keep all those measurments and dimensions, you might even be producing a supplementary plan at this rate.....:D
     
  9. rattus
    Joined: Feb 2008
    Posts: 61
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 74
    Location: US

    rattus Señor Member

    It's not horribly difficult to design a 4-bar mechanism using the graphical method.

    Once that's done, Cinderella is a fun way to simulate the mechanism. Granted, not nearly as satisfying as the empirical method, but it does avoid a lot of holes. ;-)

    http://www.cinderella.de

    The green bar is the center line of a proposed beam; the beam would actually encompass points D and B as well.

    I used both for a (so far on paper) design of my own and it worked well.

    Mike

    Slide cribbed from an online mechanism design presentation by Ken Youssefi, Lecturer at UC Berkeley, mechanism by me:
     

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    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  10. harryjak
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Juneau Alaska

    harryjak Junior Member

    Got my plans out yesterday. Looking at the full size frame outlines. Is there a thread on transferring these to wood? My thought is to iron the plans out to get rid of the folds, Fold a large piece of paper for each frame, lay the fold right on the center line mark, use carbon paper to transfer the line?, cut out the paper unfold it and lay it out on the plywood or on 1/4 in maple to make patterns if it looks like I might build more than one.
     
  11. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 46
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    Transfer the frame drawing

    The process I use is very simple: use a sheet of parchment paper (it is a translucent paper) with the size of the drawing, and with a fine-tipped pen to make the outline of the frame. Then with scissors, cut the design to be a true copy of the plan. In plywood, using a fine-tipped pen, draw the outline of the frame. then turn 180 degrees on axis and draw the other side of the frame.
     
  12. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 2,097
    Likes: 40, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 436
    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Use a pattern makers spiked wheel,available at any haberdashery store (in the handycrafts dept). Lay the pattern sheet, appropriately positioned, on the plywood and run the wheel hard down along the frame lines. Flop the pattern over and do the other side. Join the divots in the ply with a sharp pencil and cut the frame out with a jig saw, cutting close to the outside of the line, sand as necessary to the line, and bobs your uncle. :D
     
  13. Waterat
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 33
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: N/A

    Waterat Junior Member

    Hi, Divorce, or the treatening thereof, can play a role in deciding on the time to build.
    ' If I hear one more word about Bloody Boats, I'm out of here' and this from the
    mildest of women, you could meet in a days walk.
    I love OS7's six weeks. Any chance of knowing the number of hours involved ??

    Y'all stay well and healthy in 2011, Ye Hear! as they say in Texas,

    Johnny.
     
  14. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 116
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 61
    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    harryjak, It is important that you use a blunt edge proffesional pattern wheel with carbon paper, if you use a dressmakers pattern wheel you will perforate your plans with the sharp points and edges, and they will full to pieces and be distroyed! - see post 340 and 351 - hope this helps.
     

  15. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,232
    Likes: 42, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    beam design and patterns

    I had my "new" set of plans (thank you OS7) reproduced at my local blueprint shop for less than $30 - two copies of most of the sheets and three of the frames, so I could keep the originals in good shape. Well worth it. Rattus, I am not good enough with cad to use it, but I might have to get up to speed. I did drill a lot:confused: of holes to find a good compromise. I do have a drill press and holes and wood are quick and cheap- I now have a bit more scrap:rolleyes: I have found that the upper link could even be dyneema if sized correctly and a secondary control line is rigged from the main beam. I am still working on alternate geometry to get the control arms farther outboard to preserve space in the cabin. B
     
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