Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. ThomD
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: TO

    ThomD Senior Member

    wow! You guys have jumped way ahead on this forum. Back on page 32 you asked about my boat, and it's a Kurt Hughes. It's pretty old now, about 20 years I guess. So it is a classic also.

    Here she is:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnLmKXY-FCg&feature=related

    My tri cost 3500 to build, and prices these days are pretty similar. If you want to see what you can get for 20 times the budget, it would be the composite version of mine. This all plastic boat is so nice Wooden Boat used it as the model for their design competition. LOAL!.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ldeuwTuQaA&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL
     
  2. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    Thom, not sure where your build cost's figures are coming from - 20 years ago I could have built a B24 for maybe £1500 GBP - today, it is very unlikely that I will have any change left out of £3000 GBP - certainly in this country, prices have risen three fold for nearly all types of goods and commodities.

    For example:
    A house purchase in the UK bought 20 years ago for £200,000 GBP would now cost you approx £600,000/£700,000 GBP ...............:D
     
  3. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Is there any reason you guys aren't using Dyneema/spectra for the waterstays? Lighter weight, no corrosion......A carbon/kevlar laminate substitute for the ssflatbar might be worth checking into.
     
  4. John Jolly
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    Cavalier, I know this material is used quite a lot in modern boat building, Bruce has also mentioned it in previous posts - to be quite honest I lack knowledge in this field and I certainly do not want to experiment with the very important structral elements of this boat.
     
  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    synthetic stays- do you want to be a test pilot?

    Cavalier, the new fiber lines are wonderful and reliable if used correctly- but there is the main issue, we are all "writing the book" as we go. I probably will use some for my water stays, with the full knowledge that I am experimenting, and something might fail. I have about half of the lines on my boat now made of various types of low stretch material, and some is great, some I am going to replace or re-engineer. Stainless bar is reliable and predictable, synthetic line is not so much- terminations, chaff and stretch are all new factors to deal with and inspections and re-dos are to be expected. I think it is well worth the effort, and will be the standard in the future, but leading the pack always has its drawbacks. Or, how long can you tread water?:D B
     
  6. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Colligo (sp?) make thimbles etc.. for splicing, regular turnbuckles can be used. I've had good results with amsteel on running backstays etc.... Back when Lock Crowther designed the Buccaneer 24 he was "writing the book" too. One of my favorite quotes was from the 1976 Multihull Symposium where he mentioned he couldn't believe he'd designed the aka-ama conections on trimarans with a saddle instead of having the akas curve down and go into a socket on the ama, it hadn't occurred to him at the time. Much of design progression seems that way. Updating great old designs with worthwhile features makes sense. Of course there is much to be said for "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
     
  7. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Tom D

    Tom,when the little girl in the video was shouting in joy as she was it should make anyone proud to give a child that much happiness!:)
     
  8. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Storms

    OldSailor, was looking at the news and it appears that yawl are in for rain. Looks like its already been a wet year so this can't help matters.:(
     
  9. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    Well, slowly getting frames edged up, its taking its time because my work is not the fastest, I also bought the west system slow hardner which takes a good 24hrs to set and about 2/3 days to go off completely, I wasn't sure about using fast or slow hardener but its worked out ok on the frames, gives one plenty of time setting up the joints and of course the all important brew up - it also allows it to soak deep into the wood, this morning I edged frame 2, the widest point of the inner aperture is 15", I am 6ft tall and could well imagine sleeping in the forepeak, turning in the night and catching one's feet or ankles on the inner aperture, has any of you guys out there slept in the forepeak of B24, nice and comfy ? ........ just curious to know. :D
     
  10. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Unfortunately the people in Queensland, to the North, have been getting all the rain. We here in NSW have only been getting a few showers.
    The floods have been slowly draining Southwards in the river systems,
    bypassing the Eastern regions of NSW and causing floods in Western Victoria.
    Today is going to be a beautiful sunny day here and 32deg C. :D
     
  11. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    John. Use the faster epoxy. If you let the thin epoxy soak into the wood too far it will actually weaken the joint.
    It's best to paint on a coat of thin epoxy to both surfaces, let it soak in for some time and then coat one surface again before fastening it in place.
    Bruce has mentioned the importance of sealing the joint to prevent later ingress of moisture which could cause rot.
    With a helper we were able to install all the frames in the main hull in one hour, using fast epoxy. So Go for it Mate. :D
     
  12. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    OS, the weather is against me at this time of year, also I am not in a tremendous rush to get the hull finished, I have a large barn, but it is pretty much full with items that need to be sold/moved on - once I have a clear working area in the barn things will start moving more quickly I hope! .........'pictures will follow'

    The epoxy I am using is West and I am using it as per the instructions, the joint surfaces are wetted out both sides, then 404 high density filler is added to your tub of epoxy to thicken to glue constituency and applied - job done.........exactly as West discribe to glue a wood joint.........:D
     
  13. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Good job John. :cool:
     
  14. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    Was I talking about berth space in a boat earlier! - How about three in a bed....:D
     

    Attached Files:


  15. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Yacht like berth

    John, I don't have a cabin, so yes, I have slept in my forward "state room". I am 5'8", and there really is sleeping room, but not much head room- it is plenty long. A large forward hatch helps, as well as being really tired. There is no extra room for a partner, unless they are the size of a small pet:rolleyes: The tramps are really comfortable:) I try to always use the fastest hardener I can get by with. If the epoxy takes too long to set, I find that the joints drain and weaken the joint, as well as being messy and wasting epoxy. You are really making great progress, keep it up, and get that barn cleaned out. B
     
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