Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    Cheers Bruce - show your crew this great little video clip of 'Geant' in a storm sea with storm gib and reefed in main.......should give them confidence hosting the chute ?

    You Tube 69na69
     
  2. waltermitty
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: crossley victoria australia

    waltermitty Junior Member

    20 Knts Buccaneer

    Apologies Samnz,just gilding the lilly.
    On a much more serious note, my sympathy and I am sure from all on this forum at tragic loss of life at the NZ mine disaster.
     
  3. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

  4. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    diegokid Junior Member

    questions

    After more reading I have some general questions about stitch n glue.

    1. I see where the holes are drilled and the wire twisted together then the inside seam is filed with the peanut butter. Then the outside wires are cut off flush and sanded down to the outside of the hull you then can see where the wire is and saltwater shouldn't have a big effect on it. I had also seen where the inside was done between the stiches then the complete stich pulled out. Is one a preferred method, easy to see which one is easier?

    2. Copper wire. Over the years I have rebuilt my old shop and built a new house ect. Needless to say I have a lot of copper wire left over from old house and shop plus trimmings from new const. Nothing wrong with the old stuff just had critter bites on some of it after 50 years. Most of this is #12 wire with some #10. Are these sizes suitable for stitch and glue, yes my wife and I are packrats.

    3. Best way to make scarf joints! Have some treated ply left from shop and other projects to pratice on instead of messin up the good stuff.

    I have most basic wood tools, circular saw, jigsaw ect. sanders and bandsaws from my other hobby's. My old table saw is finally dead though. What speciality tools if any would be a good investment? Always a good reason for a new tool or three!:D
     
  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    tools

    The Buc depends on the "frame"- much of the strength in the ends and bulkheads comes from it, and it is easy to build. Once you have a frame, it is MUCH easier to staple/nail the skin than to stitch. Some designs work fine in stitch and glue, but once you have built with a frame, I think you will agree it is faster and easier with a more complex shape like the Buc. The Buc goes together very quickly if you stick to the design and the plans are simple but very effective. I have a full shop and use most of the tools, but a good jig saw is the main cutting tool and then some sort of power nailer/stapler would speed things up. You probably have everything else. Most of the material is very light weight and easy to handle. I do cut my frame material on my table saw, but it can be purchased almost to size. - A building note- The copper nails as called for in the plans are slower to install but extremely durable, mine from 35 years old are tighter than when installed new. The copper leaches into the wood around them and protects from rot and seems to increase their bite. Bruce
     
  6. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    diegokid Junior Member

    buc 24

    Somewhere on the hundreds of pages I've read I thought I read where part of the buck was stitch and glue. If its easier and faster with the frame method thats good too. I figure something new to learn.

    Excuse the fat fingers I have a bobo on one and it makes typing more difficult. Thanks for the info.
     
  7. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    There is no "Stitch & Glue" in the Crowther Buccaneers.
    The Stitch and Glue method is only used in designs which use the "Tortured Ply" method of construction, such as the Tornado catamaran, etc: :cool:
     
  8. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    diegokid Junior Member

    my mistake

    I've read so much stuff this past week or so I very well may have been looking at another boat design.:eek:
     
  9. jamez
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    jamez Senior Member

    Stitch n' Tape

    also describes simple flat panel boats like this Seagull rowboat I built a few years back. The only compounding or torturing is in the side panels at the bow. I used cable ties on this one - worked well - trim with stanley knife, round chine and glass over.

    Ray Kendricks Scarab designs use a more advanced version of this method with a male or female mold to hold the panels in the correct shape while the joins are coved.

    http://www.teamscarab.com.au/construction/scarab-670.html

    And i assume this one goes together in a similar fashion

    http://www.syasperformance.com/designs-sail.html
     

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  10. waltermitty
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: crossley victoria australia

    waltermitty Junior Member

    Sails

    Hi all,
    For those who are interested in costing out their Buccaneer 24 build, Lee Sails Hong Kong quoted approx. $1000 AUD for the main and #1 jib.
    $3000 for full set of sails and $250 delivery.
     
  11. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    diegokid Junior Member

    Full set

    What does the full set consist of?
     
  12. waltermitty
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: crossley victoria australia

    waltermitty Junior Member

    Sails

    Hi Diegokid [great name],
    The set consists of the main,#1 &#2 jibs spinnaker all as designed by Lock Crother
    . Deliverywas to Australia [Melbourne].The #2 jib is the genoa. Hope this helps.
     
  13. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Back in 1971 my friend and I imported that same sail set, each, from Lee sails. There were no such things as 'Fathead' or 'Squarehead' mainsails or 'assymetric spinnakers' then. We cruised and successfully raced with those standard sets ---which cost us less than locally made sails.
    I would be interested to hear how Lees present prices (including shipping cost) rack up against todays local loft prices.
     
  14. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    Books

    Ordered some books, I was told that The case for the Cruising Tri was an informational read so I ordered it and a few others. Besides that book is popping up up at a lot of the websites I go to anyway. Has anyone else found anything on the 28 ft. yet?
     

  15. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    diegokid

    I'm a retired USAF guy, flew for almost 24 years. My favorite spot to be sent to was an island in the Indian ocean called Diego Garcia. First trip there was in 1984, last trip was in 2005. I will really miss that place. If I could take my wife with me I would go and never leave. It's the best kept secret in the military.

    For awhile in the 80's I was spending as much time there as home so one of my commanders called me the "Diego Kid" on a whim and the nickname stuck. I had rather be there than anywhere else in the Pacific. I miss it!:(
     
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