Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    danskram Junior Member

    Al, Yeh I need a power stapler and power planer.
    Dan
     
  2. Oceannavagator
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    Oceannavagator Junior Member

  3. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Modern power staplers can be rented and consist of a self contained portable unit powered by a compressed gas cartridge. A far cry from the electric powered pressure tank unit on wheels joined to the staple gun by a pressure hose. It was unwieldy I know, but far better than hand hammering in thousands of bronze ringnails as we did on my first 24' tri,--a Piver Nugget. :eek:
    Electric planer is an absolute must, unless you want to develop a mighty forearm. :D
     
  4. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    rot and bucs

    My buc 24 is 35+ years and was built in Canada almost exactly to the plans. (I think by a friend of OS) The epoxy has done a very good job of preventing rot, but I think using rot resistant marine ply would be a good idea, particularly in the bulkheads and decks. (power-ply* and others) Mine spent most of the last 25 years in the water in Maryland- warm in the summer, freezing in the winter and most of the damage has been from rain water. The cabin and decks rotted and were replaced, the bottoms of the hulls are in very good condition. I have made several repairs and a new dagger board on mine using Raka brand (from florida) epoxy and have been pleased so far. Price and service is also good. Their brand seems to work particularly well in warmer southern US weather and gives you plenty of lay-up time. I don't like to hurry:) I made a new hull bulkhead from OS's plans and it fit perfectly!!:) They are easy to work from once you see what Crowther intended. If any builder has any detail questions, just ask. I do have some ideas for changes/modifications and I am still trying to engineer a good folding system. Right now though, I am just sailing mine and enjoying it. :cool: Bruce
     
  5. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    To those of you who may be inexperienced in the use of a power planer, don't set the blades to cut too deep, and practice a bit on scrap wood before attacking your pride and joy.

    A good tip to speed things up is to attach a piece of wood, or alloy angle, to the platen of your planer so that it rests on an adjoining stringer when you are cutting the angle on the chines and keels. Makes a perfect chamfer each time.

    Cheers. OS7. :D
     
  6. Oceannavagator
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Oceannavagator Junior Member

    Bruce,
    If you have ideas for improvements I'd certainly like to hear them. Since I'm in the planning and procuring stages. One thing I belive I'll change is the rigging with the new non stretch rope instead of wire. It's much lighter and looks more suitable for a boat that gets derigged several times per year for trailering.
    Mike :)
     
  7. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Yes Mike.

    IMO that is the modern way to go.

    If anyone wants to learn about it ---just Google "Dyneema".
     
  8. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    buc 24 changes

    The buc 24 sails quite well as designed, but the rig (and rigging)and the foils are primitive and can be improved with little difference in cost, at least here in the US. I priced new aluminum pipe for the cross beams, and at 600 to 800 dollars they would cost, composite beams really start to make good sense- probably lighter, stronger and maybe less money. They can also free up cabin and cockpit space, and should be easier to make fold or dismount. Are you planing your boat as a cruiser or?? I think Crowther did a really wonderful job of keeping the Buc 24 easy and inexpensive to build and still provide good all round performance. Almost every modification I have considered adds to build time, weight, and/or cost, so they have to be analyzed very carefully. Of course, I am going to keep changing mine:) Bruce
     
  9. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Bruce said --
     
  10. Oceannavagator
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Oceannavagator Junior Member

    Bruce said
    You need to shop a little more Bruce, I've got them new at less than 400 bucks locally.
    As far as the foils are concerned, I can't imagine anyone not putting a NACA section on them both. I think that they need to be a little thicker and I have yet to see a daggerboard or a keel for that matter that wasn't improved with an end plate.
    Rig wise, I'll do some research on what aluminum mast section that is appropriate, but for me the boat will be just a quick little boat to sail and weekend in, I'm not interested in formal racing. I'm planning to keep the boat on a trailer rigged up during sailing season and just slap it in the water on the weekend. This saves about two thirds of the slip fee and 99 % of the wear and tear on the boat. It also allows for easier maintenance.
    I've read about guys who have; lengthened the hull, dropped the chine line lower aft, added 5 feet onto the stick, wanted to build the boat from aluminum, wanted to build out of foam sandwich and some even wilder stuff. At what point do you say "I bought the wrong plans?" As it is, the buc is a small, easy to build inexpensive boat that sails pretty well, I think it ought to be built pretty much like it's designed.
    Mike
     
  11. bruceb
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    bruceb Senior Member

    buc mods

    Mike, you are right on the pipe prices, I had checked last year and al has really dropped since then:) I had included a 6' piece of 4" od 1/4' wall to replace the wooden joint plugs- a worthwhile up-grade. Mine have gotten really loose over the years. On the mods, I don't agree. (this is a forum:rolleyes:) While the Buc 24 is a good boat as built, it is a 40 year old design that can be improved. Easily. I have been sailing mine for a year and experimenting and studying other designs, and I think that the simplicity and easy construction that Crowther intended can be kept and he would have probably made about the same changes if he designed the Buc today. Most of his later designs and almost all "modern" tri's have longer high volume floats, the buc's can be extended one "station" (just over two feet) and gain some much need forward reserve flotation. My bows dip just a little too easily for my taste, and I am used to a hobie 16. The transom extention is a little more involved, but also worth while, for a cruiser or a racer. The extra volume aft would help keep from dragging the transom with the usual oversized outboard and two adults in the cockpit and reduce the tendency to hobby-horse that the 24 is prone. Both mods together would use less than two sheets of ply total, add 80-100lbs, and about a day and a half to construction. Crowther was trying to keep the 24 to three sheets long, but today we have much better scarfing tools available and the time and material is minimal for the results. I really like my boat, but I will keep changing it as I have time. I have included some pics of the dagger board I built, it is a big change in performance, more than I expected. I have about 25hrs and $200 in it- well worth the time and money. Bruce
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Oceannavagator
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    Oceannavagator Junior Member

    A super job on the board Bruce. Is that a fiberglass stiffening strip in the middle of the board?
    Sorry, I'm just an old welding engineer and people who change my specs just drive me crazy. I guess some of my 40 year old work could stand a little updating by now too. How about giving me some insight on the mods that you would do if you were building from scratch. And by the way, where do you sail in Atlanta?
    Mike, in Richmond.
     
  13. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Manie B Senior Member

    Have you guys got a web site to buy these plans?
    Buccaneer24

    because

    http://www.incatcrowther.com/Display.php?type=design&category=Sailing

    i cant seem to find it

    thanks guys
     
  14. danskram
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    danskram Junior Member

    Buc 24 plans

    Manie, do a search for Buc 24 plans on this forum or go to ( 24" Buccaneer Trimaran Plans), or just send a Private Message to "oldsailor7". He has the plans, I just bought mine and they're really nice ..
    Dan
     

  15. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    buc board

    Thanks Mike. I am an old boat dealer and I LIKE to change things:) I like people that pay attention to details too. Yes, that is a 1/4" x 2" fiberglass batten on each side of a board, and the light colored areas are foam. The board weighs 24lbs finished with 3 layers of glass. It is 7'5" overall with a cord of 15" and 1 1/4" thick. It could be lighter, but I was too cheap to use carbon and I had to add some filler:mad: I didn't get it quite right the first try, but it is very fair now. Bruce
     
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