Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Broke a personal record today. Not scary at all! Smooth as silk! If Lockey was still alive I'd plant a big wet one on him. This boat is the bomb!
     

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  2. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Congrats Fred! What sails and how much wind?
    B
     
  3. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    I had the full main up and the Genoa only out about halfway. It was a steady 14 miles an hour wind, but it would gust up to 25 at times. I'm having so much fun with this boat, it should be illegal.
     
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  4. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Well done. Old sailor would be
    Proud.
     
  5. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Has anyone put assymetrical daggers in the amas of a buc? Is the structure strong enough if they were canted to add lift? Is it worth the effort? I'm thinking about this winters projects!
     
  6. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Fred, I think there have been several, including my old 24. It still has the trunks and the current owner has thought about trying them. I stopped sailing it and later sold it before I had much experience with them- but I think they work fine, but for racing would require a crew to move them for each tack.
    I built the boards too large for my trunks, so it was too sticky to move up and down and also had too much lift. I sanded it down too much trying to get it to fit and it broke just as it was getting loaded up. The board was an asym with a 10 inch cord, projected around 42 inches, and started lifting the loaded float out of the water around 7-8 kts. in about 8-10 kts of wind. (then broke) . The boards were mounted with a 4 degree angle of attack. They were much too powerful.
    I learned a lot though, and if I ever get time to do another tri with A boards I think I can improve the boat. I have later calculated that about a 6" cord, same projection and profile would be about right for all purpose foils. Foil technology has leaped forward and there is much more info than I was working with.
    The boat feels "bigger" and very stable with the foils, seemed to gain some to weather, and would have been faster if the foils had survived and were sized right.
    No magic, just physics. Getting the right combo though would take a lot of testing and trials, more than I have had time for. Good boards take quite a lot of time and carbon to build, and are wasted if they don't work.
    The Buc 24 is pretty robust and seems to be strong enough for float boards but my current Dragonfly is not so I didn't add trunks when I rebuilt my floats.
    Maybe my next boat project, or yours? ;)
    Bruce
     
  7. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    These asymmetric foils transformed this B24.
     

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  8. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    If one has foils in the amas, should the placement forward and back be the same as the central dagger?
     
  9. patzefran
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: france

    patzefran patzefran

    If you remove the center hull daggerboard, as the daggerboard drag is transferred to leeward float, this increase the leeward moment induced by drag, the float' slots location should / could be slightly forward of the mainhull slot.
     
  10. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Not a B24 but the quite large dagger is theoretically too far forward on this old Nugget; one would expect weather helm - but he tiller was light and balanced.
     

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  11. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Fred, my float trunks/boards on my old 24 are vertical and just a little behind the forward cross beam, and the boat seemed to balance fine. I will try to get a photo this weekend, it is docked across from my 33. I posted some photos in the Buc 24 thread when I installed the trunks, it will be sometime before 2015, I don't remember the dates. I was copying the ones Gary put in the yellow Buc.
    Bruce
     
  12. patzefran
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: france

    patzefran patzefran

    Looks the rudder is very far aft of sail's CP, which could explain !
     
  13. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    It is/was a vertical rudder when locked down; but it is hanging well aft in the just immersed position in the photograph. Rudder is still positioned in the same place as Piver originally had it. Also mast is in original position too. However rudder was redesigned to a deeper dagger shape with a clean and low drag profile. And mast was airfoil shape, no spreaders and could be rotated. One other point: the main dagger board was set to the port side (to clear the main keelson stringer) with the trailing edge in line with mast. Although onlookers commented that this unconventional position would affect balance on port or starboard ... it didn't.
     

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  14. patzefran
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: france

    patzefran patzefran

    P1040071.JPG Jacques et Bob (7).jpg
    I Built / owned a Tremolino MK 4 ( last version with higher length and displacement mainhull) with 2o' ply outriggers. The daggerboard leading edge was aft the mast and I suucceded to get a neutral balance only with a very high aft mast rake (like Hobie 16 !), otherwise I had to deal with a high leeward moment.
     

  15. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Would have been difficult to place the dagger forward of the cockpit and in the cabin entrance - hence your Hobie 16 type solution ... which obviously works fine.
     
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