Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

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  2. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,188
    Likes: 34, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    B-33 for sale- For anyone on the US east coast, there is a fixed beam Buc 33 for sale on E-bay. It is in eastern Pennsylvania on or near the water, it looks like a pretty good boat, and for US 13500 it would be quite a fun toy :).
    Think BIG!
    B
     
  3. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 252
    Likes: 10, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    IMG_20180727_183824987_HDR.jpg
    Took Malabarka (my Buc has a name now) out for a short sail today. Everything just clicked for me today. This was the first I noticed the boat going faster than windspeed. The wind was 5mph and the boat was going between 6 to 6.5 knots. Is this good, or just average for a buc? I got pretty excited about it. I know the windspeed was correct cause the sailing associarion has a weather station on a pier that is updated every few seconds and it can be accessed on the internet. The boat speed was using navionics.
     
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  4. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,188
    Likes: 34, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Your boat looks great Fred, and I like the new name.
    Yep, normal, get used to going "fast". :)
    Depending on the point of sail, you can exceed wind speed up through the mid teens. Bucs are fun!
    B
     
  5. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 60
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    After 5 years, the birth of our second child, building a new house, moving, and having a tree take out the mast my Bucc got back in the water this season. Modifications for the launch include new rotating mast (from Corsair 24), new main, new synthetic rigging (splicing is your friend), extended dagger board and new welded brackets for attaching amas. I can now assemble and launch the boat by myself, minus stepping the mast, in three hours. The rotating mast and tuning the synthetic rigging took a little experimentation, but things seemed to get dialed in over the course of the season. We were able to climb over the 15kt barrier the last time out, which made me then wonder what the best way to depower the boat on a broad reach is. These boats can get the heart pumping at times.

    Thanks for all the great tips on this forum. I love learning from others who have experience on these great boats.


    sailing 2018.JPG IMG_0001.JPG IMG_1300.jpg
     
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  6. Tom.151
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 193
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: New England, USA

    Tom.151 Senior Member

    Congrats Carl. Boat looks sweet as hell on the water.
     
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  7. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 60
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    Thanks Tom, you had a big hand in thinking through getting it back in the water. Come up next year for a sail!
     
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  8. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 252
    Likes: 10, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    I'm debating motor options on my buc. I am planning all electric. I have all the parts except controller to put in an inboard setup. But, I could also put the electric motor on an outboard bottom end and build an electric outboard. The inboard would be easier to use, but will have more drag than an outboard. The outboard will be more weight hanging off the back instead of the better weight distribution of the inboard setup. I have a folding prop. But how would ikeep the electric motor from getting wet? It is air-cooled so needs airflow. I cant decide which way to go, so I figured I'd post here, since I've always got lots of help from you guys. Which way would you go? Actually there is a third choice of using an outboard bottom end to build an electric saildrive.
     
  9. Tom.151
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 193
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: New England, USA

    Tom.151 Senior Member

    Hello freddyj

    In all sincerity, choice for propulsion depends on the weight budget.

    People will confirm that for the B-24 and similar proper sailing (good to weather) small light trimarans, that it's quite acceptable to go with out an engine altogether.
    In dicey situations, when the wind is unfavorable from the expected strength or direction, you need to use your anchor to pin yourself in close and dinghy on to the dock or shore taking a line ashore to use for warping in the last few meters.

    It's really a lot easier to sail one of these engineless that most imagine -- and if you practice your approaches to shore and docks, youll soon discover that you're quite sure if yourself going without the engine assist afterwards. Borrow a very small o/b 2 0r 3 hp just to give you a bit of security while learning.

    All the best with that great boat you've got there.

    Tom
     
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  10. trip the light fandango
    Joined: Apr 2018
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 16, Points: 18
    Location: Rhyll Phillip Island Victoria Australia

    trip the light fandango Senior Member

    I think that the extra drag and having something as delicate as the prop and shaft, not to mention the through hull bearing potential leaking point makes the inboard too problematic. The main issue for my 23 Trem is getting enough depth for the prop when it is choppy, when you need it to say get the bow to the other side of a headwind in a confined space. I toyed with getting a more powerful motor than the 4hp long shaft twin I now have, tried an 8hp, it isn't worth it, the bloody noise and weight for maybe 2 extra knots flat out. A 15hp nearly the same weight as the 8hp would maybe get up to 10 knots if I remove all other excess weight. If you are going to the trouble of putting an electric motor on a leg, keep it light, being able to lift the motor off easily, up to 15 kgs is a big advantage, it's safer and more practical and versatile. It should be relatively easy to fit a cowling over the electric motor and with a little computer fan into the air outlet via a tube which would draw hot air collecting at the top of the cowling . To keep water out the vent inlet /outlet needs to have filters that can stop splash, so they probably point down wards. It would be nice to have butterflies like a choke that can seal for peace of mind, but covers or even corks on string could do it, a lid on top that can be opened for good weather would be useful. If the inlet oulet tubes do a loop with little draining tubes with taps for releasing any water collecting at the bottom of the loop Depending how hot the day is the motor would be fine fully sealed in a cowling for a short burst, you could add a temperature gauge. Having a really quiet motor would be fabulous. As mentioned above my boat, like yours can easily make headway with a 5 knot wind it is just as easy to secure to my mooring under sail, and dropping sail on a busy or narrow waterway complicates the process just where there are expensive things to run into, I still have to leave the helm either way to grab the buoy. I have been using a 2.3hp and it is very effective, but it 's a short shaft. Creating hurdles/ distractions that stop me from actually using the boat is something I'm pretty good at, I wouldn't recommend it though. Those Buccs are pretty flash.
     
  11. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 2,924
    Likes: 80, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    All you belts and braces people, a light B24 can slide along sweetly in virtually no wind, creates its own. Motors are just stupid weight and air drag - and imbalance the platform, transom down, therefore slow. If you need to move in flat calm, do what the R2A crews do, have a paddle or oars. In any breeze, you'll be sailing?
     

  12. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 60
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    Agreed... in four seasons with my Bucc I have used my 2.2 hp outboard once to get back to the mooring. If i was trying to get back to a marina berth, that might be a different story.
     
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