Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. Ilikeboats
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 29
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    Location: Iowa

    Ilikeboats Junior Member

    I'm considering stretching a small cat plan to increase accommodations and I do realize it changes all the ratios almost making it like a new build so thinking of taking your old b24 extension idea and co-opt it for that to get the things the small cat is desperately missing. I don't remember who I am referencing but they had a profound point about small trailer able multi hulls at around this size is that almost all professionaly designed plans are focused completely on fast boats at this length (missing the reasons a big group of us want one) when a multi is already a great,fun,and fast enough boat. For the same speed,as a mono, are just looking for accommodation so we can get others to go along with us on our small close to shore boating adventures. Things we are looking for our companions enjoyment include a great ride without leaning over, a secure fun feeling, and usable spaces inside and out. For some, it isn't about being alone sailing fast as much as sharing a love for boating with them and a place to bunk with them getting out of the elements. Not scaring the pants off of them is important to make it a fun outing. Frankly ,in the case of the Tri's, the slapping of the armas can raise a eyebrow from others experiencing small interactive sailing for the first time. They don't know what slow is and the first time rush is amazing regardless.
    Do I make the point that he enlightened me on clear?
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  2. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    most paint will stick to sanded and prepped epoxy, but IMO, the barrier coat is better and also protects your epoxy sealer from sanding in the future.
    B
     
  3. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    IMG_20170611_193901609_HDR.jpg IMG_20170610_195315659.jpg IMG_20170610_195307953.jpg
    Got the plexiglass work done this weekend. Had enough to do the companionway in plexi also.
     
  4. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Looking good Freddy. Cutting plexiglass is a slow, careful job.
     
  5. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    I have a question about mounting my jib tracks. I have a one inch thickness of wood. Would screws embedded with epoxy be strong enough, or should I thru-bolt with washers and nuts on the inside?
     
  6. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Through bolt, given that the are in cabin area use dome headed nylocs if possible and retighten after some use.
     
  7. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 226
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Can I get opinions on this Ama attachment? It is 3/16 aluminum. IMG_20170822_192450942 (1).jpg
     
  8. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Is that it? Are you going to weld the verticals to the tube?
    Is the wood just positioning the parts?
     
  9. UpOnStands
    Joined: Nov 2015
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    Location: Sydney

    UpOnStands Senior Member

    Does not look long term viable.
    Where are the internal bulkheads relative to the center line of the tube? Indicated by the just visible pencil lines?
    Do you plan on making the aluminum brackets demountable or fixed permanently?
     
  10. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    The bulkheads are in the original locations. The brackets will be welded to the tubes. I am thinking of keeping the wood there so the big bolt can go down through the waterstay and help stiffen things up. I was missing four of the stainless clamps, so it was easier and cheaper for me to fabricate the aluminum brackets than to try to have the stainless ones made.
     
  11. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Fred, this is the way they were done on a B 26. I am not judging if it is appropriate. I don't think the 26 was sailed all that much after it was rebuilt, but it is a nice clean joint.
    B
     

    Attached Files:

  12. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I'd make a saddle on the amas, put some sort of clamps on the aka tubes to make a channel and use Wharram style lashings. A couple things I'm worried about with the 3/16s are the point loadings of the narrow contact on the tube and the resistance to side bending and twist fatigue. 1/2" anyone? Or composite? Something wider to spread the load. While these might seem like over kill that is a joint you don't want to see go south.
     
  13. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Any attachment system has to account for some "twisting" and side loading. The bow of the float in front of the forward beam puts a lot of uplift on the float when the boat hits a wave- sometimes at speeds close to twenty knots, don't underestimate the forces involved. The front third of the float is suddenly supporting the entire mass and inertia of the boat. Movement happens! I have watched it on mine. Think three or more "G" loading. Crowther's design, rot prone and leaky though it may be, is very fatigue resistant. Aluminum is simple and fairly easy to fabricate, but must be oversized enough to not flex at all, or it WILL fail. 6061 is wonderful material, but it and any welds will fail if there is any flex at the joints. Be very careful changing Crowther's design.
    I do like your progress, just think any changes through completely.
    B
     
  14. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 226
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    My forestay is short to reaching the chainplate by about ten inches. What is the proper way to attach them?
     

  15. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Fred, there is usually a turnbuckle. Where (or how) did you get the length for your forestay?
    B
     
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