Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    db trunk fixin

    OS7 timely and informative, thank you so much.

    Barry, yup it was only on CL for 2 days and I swooped it i think a lot of people were interested. Are you interested in a non-equity partnership? I'm sort of stretching myself financially with this situation, because its been a dream to have one... PM me if you are.

    Right now the boat is at KKMI in richmond. But I plan to dock it at Treasure Island Marina where i found an end tie. I am in SF so thats the closest i could find.

    Im focusing on repairing the trunk so i can get it back in the water asap and stop accruing yard fees. It came with an excellent long shaft 6hp nissan so I'll just motor it to TI then take my time building new foils.

    I'll check out the straight board mod, that sounds great. Otherwise i agree, I think removing the back strip could be the best way. the keel seems to be ok, and the back strip was pretty much just smooshed against it. I bought an oscillating sander/cutter and will try and cut it out today. if its no good ill probably keep going with the straight board mod.

    Some of the deck in the cockpit and a couple places on the gangway need to be replaced as well. the epoxy is lifting and i need to see whats going on with the wood. Otherwise the boat is in excellent shape.

    Previous owner had custom nets made, custom boom vang, and custom sails from the original plans, so Im pretty stoked. Next project is a "prodder" and mast head asym!
     
  2. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    db case

    p123 post 1844- OS7 were you able to complete these plans? I am leaning toward a local fix i think at this point.
     
  3. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    found it! post 1872
     
  4. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    you know, after actually looking at the plans, and not knowing the next time ill have it out of the water, i think the straight boards the way to go. besides i have to build a new dagger board anyway!

    when pulling the old case out of the keel, and removing the stainless bolts (which might be epoxied in?) is there a correct way to break the bond? i was going to use my oscillating saw blade to try and jam in-between the keel/case. maybe cut the bolts if they won't back out, then drill them i guess.
     
  5. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    Yeah you swooped on it! Thanks for part offer, but once you get on top of it I think you'll be in better shape, and glad that it's all yours! Haha I'd try to turn bolts out before ha take blade to it, and some hammer taps and heat can do. Wonders sometimes. And don't think I'd ever try to split the keel and box, specially if box is gonna go. If you do it perfect your still taking half a blade from keel right? I'd take it all down and cut as much of box as you can then with more space, and a better view, you can excise it right where you need to. Wish I had more time as of late, I'd load my truck up with tools and get dusty with ya just to check out a bucc!

    Barry
     
  6. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    Re-read post too, I'm guessing the tool ha got was the multi tool type cutter? They can work well but stock up on blades, the burn out quick on solid wood. Sawzall's will cut through anything! But they also can shake things to bits if they snag, a nice circular saw would allow you to buzz most of upper case rigth off so you can work closer at bottom intersection.


    Barry
     
  7. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    Come get dusty

    Thanks Barry for your advice. I've done some carpentry stuff but this is my first time with epoxy and boats. I'm on my own for this project. Im at the boat today and tomorow and probly most of the week to try and get it back in the water. You'll welcome to join me!
    About to cut into the dagger board case! Yikes!
    Happy to take you (or any other Buc enthusiasts) sailing sometime once I get it back in the water!
     
  8. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Marmoset Senior Member

    Might take ya up on that! If I do get free time you'll be first to know! And take your time, you can always keep cutting, but if you get carried away it's hard to add wood back in! Lol. Had a thought too, it might be a benefit ,after you've taken most of the case height away, to split front walls out and then clamp sides into center away and off the screws. This way it will take off some glued area, and maybe leave a lot of bolt hanging out to get a grip on. And take tons of pics! Will help to see what you are doing and also gives you reference to look at for mods to do later.

    Barry
     
  9. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Just a word of warning. If you are going to use any type of jig or buzz saw,
    wear a mask. Epoxy dust is very toxic. :eek:
     
  10. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    +1


    Heck as a wood guy I wear a mask every time on virgin wood!




    Barry
     
  11. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    How were cases bolted in at factory? Heads to keel, nuts to box, or visa versa? Guess either way if he can get one end snipped off he can drive or screw them back out.


    Barry
     
  12. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    dg board case rebuild

    So today was demo day. with a combo of jig saw, an oscillating plunge cutter, and sanders, i got the dagger case out as well as the cleats on the sides of the hulls and tried to clean up the cleats on frame 4.

    [​IMG]

    The stainless bolts, totally moved! However they were too long to remove. they must have been put in before the sides of the hulls were put on. so I guess I'm going to have to cut them with a grinder and fill the holes. The aft bolt did a very good job retaining the dagger box in the collision it looked like. The keel was pretty unaffected, but the bolt did seem to stop more damage from occurring. Im wondering how i can include bolts again when i drop in the new case. since there is no room on the side of the keelson to fit them through.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Cleveland
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: San Francisco

    Cleveland Junior Member

    dagger board case build

    So the instructions for the case is pretty vague. i believe it is one sentence on the first page of the instructions. Advising you to glass the inside in 5oz cloth before assembling.

    The case i took apart, had glass that spanned the inside joints. How do you do that before assembling? I assumed you would glass the inside pieces individually then assemble with just epoxy in the corners. do you lay it up while assembling the box? then use some rope or a stick or something to try and apply pressure? Seems incorrect.
     
  14. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Barry, The individual insides of the pieces of the box are glassed before assembling and then glued together with epoxy glue, using ringnails, screws or staples. No need to fillet the insides unless you particularly want to.
    The sides of the box are only plywood, so the box goes right thru the keel and the bolts go straight through the keel re-inforcement pieces, the keel, the ply and the fore and aft box members. Makes the whole thing incredibly strong. (see the diagram).
    The exposed end fibres of the box are then flush with the keel and have to be sealed with a layers of epoxy soaked glass cloth in which a hole has been cut to match the section of the board. This also stops turbulence in the board box and gives extra protection to the surface of the keel when grounding. This glass patch is best laid up with several layers on a piece of waxed glass, the slot for the board is then cut accurately in it and it is epoxied in place onto the keel.
    Not tricky with a fine toothed blade in a jigsaw. Hope this helps. :D
     

  15. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    Glad ya got it all out! Looks nice and clean down there. I think I'd just cut bolts out then maybe use holes to drill out so new bolts can pass through, then plugs from outside when done. I'd imagine, and paddy would know this answer better, that when the new case is made something like a newer slot seal could be used. Basically it goes across bottom of box and you slice it for board to pass through. Might wanna check hole sizes as well in case there was stretch from the ground strike and upsize new bolt accordingly?


    Barry
     
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