Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    I wish I had the time to write all my mistakes down. It'd be a thick book!
    What I'm really nervous about on this project is the riggig, sails, winches, etc. I barely know the names of these things. I hear and read about sails and rigging and I barely understand what I'm hearing. There are words being used that must only apply to sailboats. I've sailed small boats for years and never ever used the word "clew" or even "halyard". I just pull on ropes. So I'm kinda scared for when it's time to get it rigged. That's why I thought if I bought an appropriately sized mono, I could use the stuff and copy the way it is rigged. That way I don't need to know the names of those things.
     
  2. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

  3. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    Fred
    Send us your email via pm and we will send you a deck layout plan you can use with all terms you need.
    Shame you aren't close to us as we have everything you need from our Buc 24 test mule to give to the first NZ purchaser of the Buc 24 plans.
    Regards
    Craig and the Ezifold team



     
  4. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Names

    Fred, I am going to take a hard line ;) While it is totally unnecessary for you to know the "proper" names of boat parts to sail your boat, it is REALLY helpful to the rest of us to communicate with you. Buy a basic sailing book and learn the terms! It will be well worth your time, and save possible mistakes for all of us.
    I am sure it will be cheaper to purchase a derelict boat for the big parts, but the standing rigging is not very likely to fit the tri so you are going to have to get help and/or learn some basics. The Buc is pretty forgiving so there are a lot of potential choices. Look around your area, see what is available and run some by the forum.
    The rig only has to go on the day you launch, so you have time to shop for the best choices.
    B
     
  5. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    freddyj Senior Member

    Yes, bruceb, you are correct. It is the last thing to go on. I have plenty of time, since I'm planning a summer'16 christening. I will study my sailing for dummies book and try to learn the terms so I can converse halfway intelligently with you seasoned sailors on this forum. Please don't think that I'm an idiot, but I've had no trouble sailing without knowing what stuff is named. :) when I think I've found a good donor mono I will run it past you guys before I pull the trigger. I really appreciate the help I'm getting on this forum.
     
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  6. 2far2drive
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Houston, TX

    2far2drive Senior Member

    I used to think the naming conventions were antiquated and a little ridiculous. Then as I learned so sail my first boat, I quickly learned that the naming was perfect as it helped everyone know exactly what to look for, especially racing.

    When the wind kicks up and you are caught with full sail ip, the last thing you want to be saying to the crew is "untie the rope thingy on the hole thingy on the front of the sail". :) nomenclature is designed to avoid confusion.

    Also, the only main thing to remember in yacht club bars, it is NEVER called rope on a boat. line is the proper term. ;)

    Having fun watching your progress. Keep up the good work
     
  7. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    freddyj Senior Member

    That makes a lot of sense. If I were the captain we'd never get anywhere due to the confusion. This summer when we're sailing I will try to use the correct terminology with my crew (my wife) so it becomes natural for us. her only job is to man the jib sheets and steer when I have to piss. :)
     
  8. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    buzzman Senior Member

    According to Sir James Bisset, former Cunard Commodore who apprenticed in sailing ships, there are in fact a few ropes on old-time sailing ships, for example, the boltropes sewn into the edge of sails, and the footropes crew stand on while working on the yards.

    There are also man-ropes, used as safety lines when going over the side or down companionways (although these become lifelines when strung transversely or horizontally across/along the vessel.

    There were also wheel ropes, used for stabilizing the wheel, tow ropes for, well, towing, and boat ropes (aka as painters) for tying the boats to when floating astern or otherwise moored.

    But everything else has a 'proper' name, some of which even give a clue as to their use - eg: clew lines (pun intended); or halyards (from haul-yards - haulking up the sails attached to the yards).

    But if you want to know the story of the log line, and how (and why) speed's not 'exactly' on the knot are given as "X knots and a Chinaman", you'll have to read 'Sail Ho!': My Early Years at Sea by Sir James Bisset.

    Who, incidentally, retired in the early fifties to Manly, Sydney, Australia.

    So if your sails have boltropes sewn into the luff, and you have a painter (boatrope) for your dinghy, and a tow rope (just in case), you'll have at least three ropes even on a modern yacht.

    ;) ;)
     
  9. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Then we get into string theory....
     
  10. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    And don't forget the various chords on various beams and scantlings....
     
  11. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I bring a guitar so I can work on root inversions of augmented seven flat nine chords for hard bop versions of sea shanties....
     
  12. buzzman
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    buzzman Senior Member

    So that's your 'string' theory, then...????
     
  13. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    A string theory example of cosmic vibrations to use when contemplating quantum mechanics and boat rigging variations.
     
  14. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Of course I could be feeding the thread a line;)
     

  15. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Or 'Shooting a line'. :)
     
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