Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Quick question for those that have built a buc. I was thinking of attaching the crossarm saddles directly to the gunwales so there was not the deck plywood between. For two reasons: 1) I feel the attachment would be stronger, and 2) I wouldn't have to mill the proper angle in the bottom of the saddle. Good idea or not?
     
  2. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    Float construction detail

    Do not forget these reinforcements.
     

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  3. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Waste of time and effort, to no advantage. Just build it as designed. :idea:
     
  4. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Yes, that is the next step.
     
  5. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    Oldsailor, these structural reinforcements are foreseen in the project

    Luigi
     
  6. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I don't think we are talking about the same thing. I was talking about the GUNNEL re-inforcements, not the little stick auxiliary frame things. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    I'm with OS7. Why overbuild? It is like someone from the 1920s who wears a belt and braces just in case his britches fall down. And is unnecessary. The attached deck is going to make a complete and stiff monococque structure. I've said it ad nauseum: if you're building a multihull, dumb extra weight is only going to make the boat unsafe, meaning too heavy, meaning it will turn over quicker in gusts because it will stagger - and not accelerate away from the loads - as it would if it was built down to the correct light weight.
     
  8. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    What gunnel reinforcement are we talking about here?
     
  9. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    I think this is the post below freddyj that started confusion. As Gary and os7 have already mentioned build to plan, don't over think it keep light and strong just as Gary mentions work with the elements not against.
    Cheers
    Craig and the Ezifold team



    QUOTE=freddyj;727505 What gunnel reinforcement are we talking about here?
    *
    02-27-2015, 11:40 AM
    freddyj
    Junior Member
    *
    Join Date: Oct 2013
    Rep: 10 Posts: 56
    Location: kansas
    Quick question for those that have built a buc. I was thinking of attaching the crossarm saddles directly to the gunwales so there was not the deck plywood between. For two reasons: 1) I feel the attachment would be stronger, and 2) I wouldn't have to mill the proper angle in the bottom of the
     
  10. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Skin Thickness

    Some areas of the hull plans call for 3/16"(4mm) skin thickness. I have read that some builders just use 1/4"(6mm) everywhere on the hulls and floats. I am using meranti for my ply which is slightly heavier than okoume, so the 4mm would offset some of the weight difference. My normal sailing area has no rocks, only mud and sand, and with our low tide range, it wont be drying out, so should I go with the 4mm or the 6mm?
    Thanks
     
  11. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    I used 4mm plywood on the floats and main hull, covering everything with a FB of 100g/m2.
    It seems to be very solid.
     
  12. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    On the deck 6mm also covered with FB 100 g / m2.
     
  13. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    That's pretty lightweight cloth, around 4oz in the the old money.

    Is that a single layer all over, or did you bulk up the stress points with multiple layers?

    I know the ply basically provides the main support, but is 4oz cloth enough???

    Not criticising, genuinely curious, as I think my part-built tri only has 4-6oz cloth in a single layer, and I'm wondering about the stress points like beam attachments and so on...
     
  14. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    Dan
    Use as specified.
    Remember multihulls are m2 intensive builds so for every 2m2 of 6mm used where 4mm was specified you just added the weight of one extra m2 of 4mm to your build.
    As Gary states so often build light build strong. Echoing the advice of OS7 build to plan if the stock buck is what you want to achieve.
    Cheers
    Craig and the Ezifold team

     

  15. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I dunno, this discussion goes on and on.:rolleyes:
    I can only speak from my own experience, right or wrong.
    My B24 was made of 1/4""Samba" 3 ply. which I suspect was Luan under another name. It was light and cheap and was certainly not the best, but at $9.00 per 4 x 8 sheet it filled the bill. It was covered with a thick layer of epoxy tar, one of the avenues of research which culminated in the development of Bote-Cote epoxy. When I subsequently built two B28s I used the best 1/4" mahogany ply, with liquid epoxy, 2 coats on the inside and 3 coats on the outside, and 2" glass tape epoxied on all seams. This was light and strong, and despite all opinion to the contrary was quite sufficient to protect the surfaces from the minor bumps and scrapes which happen to all boats. When a gouge did happen it was easily repaired with a simple swipe of epoxy paste and a dab of paint.
    My B28 was holed in the aft side of one Ama by an errant boat drifting on it's mooring. The impact was bad enough to have holed any other type of construction, except steel. It was repaired with a standard wood patch repair, more easily than if the hull had been glass or sandwich construction. Glasscloth covered Ply would not have protected it any better.
     
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