Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 46
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    Mast profile

    Thank you oldsailor.

    The profile of the aluminum tube that I'm planning to use is shown below:

    Thickness:2.7 mm
    X: 130 mm
    Y: 91 mm
    Kg/m: 3.95
     

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  2. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    That might be a bit "Thin" for the standard rigging.
    The Standard tube mast is 140 to 145 mm dia, so yours at 91mm might need diamond spreaders.
    I'd like to hear others opinions, as the designed shrouds are pretty rigid and the designed mast is 61T6 alloy.
    With that section I would use a pivot.
     
  3. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
    Posts: 39
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Question. Just cut out the float bulkheads but haven't notched them yet. On sheet 4 it shows them to be flat on their bottoms with limber holes. So do I cut out the very bottom notch and stop the edging at the top of said notch, meaning the bottom of the bulkheads would be below the bottom of the edging?
    Thanks
     
  4. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    No Way. The edges of the ply must be supported.
     
  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Mast choice

    IMO, I would use a rotating fractional rig if at all possible, trying to keep the fore triangle about the same as stock and going with a slightly taller main/mast. Modern fat head or square top mains, usually with some full battens, don't have to be much taller to be much more powerful. I think you will like a little added power, and the Buc can handle it. That spar might be light for a rotator, and would certainly need diamonds.
    Look at the rig for a Corsair 24 Mk II as a good guide line. My 24 has about the same rig as a Corsair Sprint, probably a little much, but lots of fun :cool:
    The rotating masts only use the upper side stays and the forestay, and don't use the lowers. Unless you use an extremely heavy/stiff mast, the diamonds are needed.
    B
     
  6. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    The words of experience. Good ONYA Bruce. :D
     
  7. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Thanks. I guess then that the edging simply follows the profile of the bulkheads and the limber hole is cut into both after the edging is epoxied to the bulkheads. Pictures I have seen DO show the bottoms of the completed bulkheads being flat across the very bottom as in post # 580. I just want to do them properly. Thanks
     
  8. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Duh. I figured it out momentary brain fart.
    Thanks
     
  9. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Quote. "I guess then that the edging simply follows the profile of the bulkheads and the limber hole is cut into both after the edging is epoxied to the bulkheads" Quote.
    Thats right, but don't forget to liberally soak the edges of the ply with thin epoxy to protect the ply from water which will inevitably accumulate around the limber hole areas over time, even though you are going to epoxy the frames to the hull skins.
    Attention to this at this time will ensure the longevity of the hulls at these important joints.
     
  10. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Thanks Patrick, it just made me scratch my thick head a bit when I looked at sheet 4, lol. And believe me I know I have repaired a lot of boats for people especially production ones where they didn't seal edges properly. Again much thanks .
     
  11. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Finally began cutting out bulkheads yesterday. I took about 2 hours to cut out all the floats bulkheads. Mostly setup time. I used carbon paper to transfer the patterns to the ply. That works but takes a long time to setup. Today when I started the main hull bulkheads I used a pattern makers wheel, much faster. Then I simply connected all the pricks with a pencil, no need for a batten or anything, lines quality came out much better. Just excited that I finally got this project going. Thanks again Patrick and everybody else. More questions will surely be coming as I continue. Happy Sailing
     
  12. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    I'm just a little ahead of you Sailor Dan. About got one float done. What I've learned so far: 1) Coat all the pieces on the inside completely before assembly, including the bottom stringers and keel. Epoxy coating the inside after assembly sucks, especially the stem and stern where there isn't much room to get in there.
    2) Put the crossarm reinforcements on the hullsides before installing the frames. Chainplate reinforcement can easily be done later.

    Have fun!
    Fred
     
  13. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Right side up. Bracing then decking.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Sailor Dan
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: United States, Louisiana

    Sailor Dan Junior Member

    Freddy, looks like I timed starting just right, lol. The pictures you are posting are answering a lot of questions floating around in my head. You float is looking good.
    Thanks
    Dan
     

  15. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    Pictures can be deceiving, thank goodness for thickened epoxy!
    The next one will go a lot faster and be less work, since now I know sorta what the finished product is supposed to look like.

    Fred
     
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