Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    It depends on how your boom goose neck is attached to the mast.
    It should be able to slide up and down the mast in the luff groove or slide track, as required.
     
  2. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    That's where a hot wire could be handy. Hot wire shape from templates out of foam then glass wax and pull a light hollow part off, or just bend and attach foam to it then glass over on the boat.


    Barry
     
  3. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Marmoset.
    Whatever you do you must realize the front of the akas take a heavy pounding when hit by the tops of waves. You must not make new shapes too flimsy.
    Water is very heavy relative to Air, and Newton got it right with his F=MA.
    Case in point.
    On Kraken 40 #1, (Ringo), the Amas were straight, like wings, and attached to the Akas by vertical alloy H section struts. To streamline them we made bull nosed shapes with SS sheet, riveted to the vertical struts.
    By the the time we had sailed through the rough Gulf Stream on the way to Bermuda the metal fairings had been beaten flat by the impact of wave tops.
    We learned a good lesson.:eek:
    The tubular Akas of the stock B24 had no such problems.
     
  4. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    Oh yeah I wouldn't have thought it a 6 oz cloth layup kinda thing! Haha I get that it's an item that sees actual heavy, and weighted, pounding. I was thinking more along the lines of an easy method for shaping, although building It into the construction beginning would be easier.


    Barry
     
  5. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    Barry
    Build lite but strong in everything you do, design so it works with not against the medium it is intended to function in and you won't go wrong, the Buc24 is a Coastal boat at best, not an open ocean 40' er JFWIW so specify lamination schedule accordingly with a suitable FOS.
    Craig and the Ezifold team.
    [/B]
     
  6. outside the box

    outside the box Previous Member

    Hi Luigi
    I tried to attach plans for the mast foot/step and a simple raising system in jpeg format to the reply to your pm, however I couldn't attach them.
    If you still require them then pm me your email and I will attach by return or your address and I will print out and courier.
    Regards
    Craig and the Ezifold team.
     
  7. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    "Originally Posted by lgenova View Post
    Designs and ideas about building a rotating support for the mast are welcome."

    On my Piver Nugget the mast was made of 6"x 2" Douglas Fir wood, sectioned to a rough airfoil section. A 1/2' hole was drilled in the base and a SS tow ball was screwed in. The ball sat in a "well" formed by cutting a 2"dia hole in a pad made by laminating several pieces of 3/4"X6" Oak plank. Two door stops were fastened either side of the back edge of the mast to allow limited rotation of the mast by the push/pull of the boom gooseneck. A piece of thin SS plate was cut with a slot and screwed to the wood base, around the neck of the ball, once the mast was in place, to prevent the possibility of the mast jumping out of the hole. Turning of the mast was automatic on tacking or jibing.
    Worked very well for me. :D

    A similar arrangement could be done with a teardrop sectioned alloy mast, if a hardwood plug is glued and screwed into the base.
     
  8. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    How many gallons of epoxy should it take to build a Buc? I've got one hull almost done. I believe the second one will go much much faster now that I sorta know what I'm doing.
    Fred
     

    Attached Files:

  9. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    looks like a float!

    Congrats Fred!
    I am sure it will go faster now. :)
    A float is about 1/6th of the total job, so if you use three gallons to build and coat a float, you will need "about" eighteen gallons for the whole boat. Don't use that as a standard, just an example.
    I don't know what a "proper" amount of epoxy is, because every system is a little different and the number of coats/thickness varies a lot. IMO, the decks should be glassed with at least 6oz material, which will add to the epoxy needed and add some weight, but will be much more durable. If you plan on keeping it in the water, glass below the chines on the floats and below the waterstays on the main hull also helps reduce upkeep. Other people might disagree that it is necessary, ;) and my boat's hulls are not glassed.
    I like to precoat the exterior surfaces before assembly while the ply is flat on the floor and it is easy to get a smooth and even finish, but it does take more planning and space. It does seem to save epoxy, and saves me sanding time. I hate sanding! I have also found that using peel ply where ever possible saves effort and epoxy and more than makes up for its cost.
    B
     
  10. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    is 8oz cloth too heavy for the boat? That's all I can get locally without ordering it in and waiting 6 weeks.
     
  11. freddyj
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: kansas

    freddyj Senior Member

    How does peel ply work, and when would you want to use it?
     
  12. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    A weighty problem

    :D Fred, check out "Raka.com" for glass and building supplies- I use them a lot. They ship same or next day, (even to Kansas shouldn't take but two or three days) and have any quantity that you need, usually at fair prices :).
    Peel ply is a fine woven raw polyester fabric used to help smooth and protect your work. Get some, read up on it and practice using it before you do anything else. It can save you a lot of time.
    On a light boat like the Buc, every pound matters, and 4 oz to 6 oz fabric is all that is needed to form a protective layer. Any thicker just soaks up a lot of expensive and heavy resin. I wouldn't use 8oz anywhere except maybe the cockpit sole. The glass doesn't add much strength, just abrasion protection, and it really helps prevent the ply from checking. The 24 HAS to be built light, and it wasn't designed to carry any extra load. A fully epoxy coated 24, built to the plans with light ply, will end up between 1250 and 1400 lbs empty. Adding an outboard and mount, safety equipment and sails quickly puts you in the 1600 lbs range, so adding even 50 lbs of extra glass and coatings cuts into your payload. It likes to sail at under 2000lbs, and at anything over 2200 it is overloaded.
    As an experiment, why don't you use a bath scale and weigh your float as is, and after you finish it. You can do it one end at a time and add the weights, just use a short piece of 2"x2" stock or a round pvc pipe to keep from damaging the scale or distorting the reading. I am quite interested in seeing your results :)
    B
     
  13. santacruz58
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: lower hutt,NZ

    santacruz58 Senior Member

    Looks very good freddyj. Your seams are nice and fair. Your doing a great job.
    I agree with bruceb on his recomendations.
    nelson
     
  14. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Brazil - Recife

    lgenova Junior Member

    Questions about the rig of b24.

    1. By using the pivotable mast can maintain the same standing rigging scheme? The vectors of the resulting forces on the rig will change with the rotation.

    2. I am considering using a more modern rig and the idea would be something like comparison with the scarab 8 which uses an arrangement in diamond. As in my region the winds are very weak, a small increase in sail area would be convenient.

    Comments, suggestions are welcome.

    Luigi
     

  15. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Q.1. Yes. Just attach the rigging tangs to the front face of the mast, just taking care they don't jut out too far.
    Q.2.Using the rigging stays as shown in the original B24 plans you don't need diamond spreaders unless you are using a very thin teardrop section. Using the designed tubular mast doesn't need to be rotating. The KISS principle. :)
     
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