Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Yes that's the best option and if you advertise and ask around the sailing clubs and boatyards you can find great bargains. :)
     
  2. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    That's what I did for my Scarab build - scored a mast off a Farrier TT680, whihc is the same length as Ray specs for the Scarab 18, and is an ovoid/teardrop profile thick walled section.....

    Another option might be to add carbon filaments to the mast to strengthen it....or perhaps if the Hobie mast is round (as many were I believe) then it should be possible to use the alloy tube as a hollow stem and make a 3mm play skin over it to make the mast into a teardrop shape, epoxy and or carbon fibre for strength.....

    Probably be cheaper than buying a new length of teardrop profile mast section.

    Ask Gary, he's made wing masts in that profile out of ply....
     
  3. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    mast

    Freddy, I would be careful of using any "beach cat" masts, as they are especially light weight and often just barely strong enough on the boat they were designed for. After almost any windy cat regatta, there will be several bent/broken masts. I used to sell them:rolleyes: As OS suggests, try to find stronger mast, the Buc 24 has a lot of righting moment and will overload both masts and sails easily. My Stiletto 23 section bends quite a lot when it is loaded, and it is a much larger section with diamond stays.
    All the smaller cats built in the US have used very thin walled teardrop shaped sections, most of them rotating.
    B
     
  4. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    camber in amas

    Hi All,
    Can anyone tell me the designed camber height on the amas at the forward and aft points of attachment of the beams? Is the beam supposed to sit on the crown of the ama, or be held off by some distance? I am replacing my ama/beam connection with something a bit more user friendly, and want to make sure I do not stray far from the design.

    Thanks in advance
    Carl
     
  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Three answers- not quite correct

    :rolleyes: Carl, I will have to get my plans out monday to give you an exact answer/measurement for the rear dimension. The front beam with water stay extension under it should "just" clear the crown of the float, and that somewhat depends on your float deck. They are not all built the same, but you want the float to end up mounted as high as possible forward. If your crossbeams are installed to plan and in the same horizontal plane, the rear beam saddle height controls the angle of the float to the main hull waterline. I will get you that measurement off the plans, but you might prefer to measure your own boat and see what would keep the float from being mounted bow down. On several 24s I have seen, the rear saddles need to be taller than the plan shows, but for sure, they have all been different, and tend to be too much float bow down.
    While you are measuring;) also "X" the floats to make sure they are mounted lined up with the main hull fore and aft. I have found it is very hard to find good reference points on the floats once they have been repaired a few times, and they are usually mounted off center. I use a construction laser to establish a center line on mine.
    B
     
  6. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Sorry folks. Can't answer questions right now.
    Have to evacuate due to encroaching bush fires.
    Watch this space. Paddy.
     
  7. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    I was wondering how you were going today, hope it all works out ok for you.
     
  8. cruiserpete
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: Australia

    cruiserpete Junior Member

    Once off Strait crossing (Bass Strait - Australia/Tasmania)

    Hi all,

    I'm considering selling my Investigator 563 trailer sailer in favour of a Buccaneer 24 Tri. Long story short, I purchased the I563 to get back into sailing before going on at a later stage to larger keeler however, I'm now seriously considering a trimaran.

    Thus, I'm thinking of taking the same path to a larger tri by getting a smaller tri, sailing it see understand the dynamics of a tri and then in 5 or 6 years investing in a larger more ocean going Tri.

    Problem is, there are no affordable small tri's in Tasmania (a few Trailer Tri 720's but into $30 000 so out of my entry level budget) I would like to get a more affordable tri such as, a Crowther Buccaneer 24 to get back into sailing and learning the dynamics of a tri but sailing one from mainland Aust to the Island of Tasmania entails crossing a treacherous piece of water, Bass Strait.

    Although, the Buccaneer 24 will spend the next 5 or 6 years coastal cruising , Bass Strait is a notorious and treacherous piece of water and that's is my worry. If need be I could demount it and treailer it but I'll need a trailer (cost involved), bring it over Bass strait on the ferry (big cost) so I'd rather sail it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bass_Strait
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013
  9. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    A Bass Strait crossing is no worries really you just need to be able to wait for a decent break in the weather to sail the boat across. If you purchase a boat and let me know I'll be able to help with a mooring in Westernport Bay until your ready to sail your boat across. Some of our members at Multihull Yacht Club of Victoria regularly cruise the Islands in Bass Strait in their trailerable trimarans so we can provide help, advice or even possibly crew with you for the crossing.
     
  10. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Paddy,

    Stay close to water .... praying for all of ya'll, it does not sound good on the news.

    wayne
     
  11. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    cp

    You just missed out on a part-built TT720 that went for $2K a cuppla months back - very similar to B24 and opportunity to custom build over time as budget allows....

    But there's one for sale up the road from me whihc is apparently a good one, been discussed here previously, and would be a good deal even at asking price, but sure to be able to knock off a grand or two....

    http://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sailing-trimaran/crowther-buccaneer-24-sailing-trimaran/136585

    Sure we could find crew if you can't convince someone to help you sail it home.... :)
     
  12. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Thanks Wayne, Corley and others for your concern.
    We are safe at our daughters house in Palm Beach and just waiting to see how things pan out with the fires in the mountains. Hope our house is still there :(

    Regarding the B24. Bruce is right, beams should just clear the top of the rounded ama deck. You can't go wrong if you have made the beam saddles to the dimensions on the plans. It is important to check that the front and back beam tubes have exactly the same dihedral angle as each other at the join in the middle, otherwise you will have the amas with the ends pointing too high or too low.
    The gunnels of the amas should be parallel to the gunnels of the main hull when the boat is finally assembled.
    Having sailed quite a lot in Bass Strait I can tell you that Corleys advice is well
    taken. Paddy.
     
  13. warwick
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: papakura south auckland new zealand

    warwick Senior Member

    It is good to hear that you are safe Paddy. Hopefully next you will be able to retrun to a home.
     
  14. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    OS7,
    Hope you grabbed the Bucc plans on the way out ;)
    Hope all is well.
    RR
     

  15. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    ALAS RR,
    We "Bugged out" just like a scene from "MASH". Taking only clothes, Idents, insurance documents, jewelry and cash. Mostly because, believe it or not, empty houses are being looted. :eek: I even left behind my precious Canterbury Sailplanes "Eraser" R/C slope soarer glider.:(.
    I'm sure there are enough B24 plans around the planet now that it won't be lost.
     
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