Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. PHTCA
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    PHTCA Junior Member

    I read some other fiberglass boats forums and someone say the hull is made with single skin fiberglass and the top with sandwich type foam fiberglass. Other built a monohull with 2 cm fiberglass to protect, so, minimal hull thickness?
     
  2. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Solid glass is often used below the waterline in larger yachts but in the Buccs case would be grossly overweight, 2cm is icebreaker territory for this hull.
    Stick with ply if you are not skilled in grp as the sandwich laminates required to get down to a similar weight will use expensive materials and not have any margins for amateur glass work !
    But for the record i would use Sglass externally and internally and perhaps carbon internally, stay away from kevlar. I would also weigh up wether going to a 100k foam rather than 75k would pay off. Consult a materials supplier.
     
  3. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    How many of you who have received plans from me have actually built one, are building one ----or intend to build one soon. ???:?:
     
  4. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    Bigger badder Buc?

    I have been busy:D Doing some sailing on the 24, not much racing but having a lot of fun with it- So! I found a Buc 33 last spring, and after much thought and planing, I bought and modified a trailer, traveled 600 miles south to Miami, cut the boat apart and brought it home. Quite a project, but I think it will be worth the effort and it will be a very nice boat. It is a LOT bigger, but not really a large tri. It still seems managable, and has a lot in common with the 24s and 28s.
    I will be sailing my 24 this fall (at least until some one purchases it) and I will continue to post here. I have the 33 at the house where a modified 24/26 is stored so I will get some more details on that boat also.
    Bruce
     

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  5. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    buzzman Senior Member

    bruce
    That is a nice looking boat. Would it be impertinent to ask how much it set you back.....??
    Slap my wrist if that's a 'question too far'....

    As you've now cut the beams, are you considering re-attaching them with a hinge like the one you've been fiddling about with in model form....???

    I have some ideas on that subject if you'd like to hear them send me a PM.

    Not going to embarass myself here in full view of the experts! <<<<grin>>>>>
     
  6. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Congratulations Bruce! I'm glad you got the 33, it should open up some new territory.
     
  7. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    lgenova Junior Member

    Buccaneer 24 building progress...

    The cabin after undercoat applied.
     

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  8. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    lgenova Junior Member

    Buc 24 beams

    Now i'm starting to build the plywood beams and i'm using the template from Samnz as a starting point.

    Here some measures:
    Side plates: 10mm marine plywood;
    Top and bottom: two layers of 6mm marine plywood each.
    200mm square.
    All enveloped by two layers of 200g/m2 FG, with reinforcements where the loads will be absorbed.

    I left a gap of 200mm between frames 4/4a and 7/7a on the main hull to fit .

    Suggestions are wellcome.

    Luigi
     

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  9. John Perry
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    John Perry Senior Member

    'Suggestions are welcome' but since you are already chopping up the timber perhaps its a bit late now, still I did wonder if you had considered including some unidirectional grain as well as plywood (presumably 0/90 grain) in the top and bottom of your 200mm square section beams.
     
  10. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    lgenova Junior Member

    Buc 24 beams

    Tks, Jonh.

    Even having started cutting the pieces, I do not hesitate to change and/or implement a good suggestion.

    A big problem is making a turn, even soft, the wood together the form of the beam, thats why I use two layers o 6mm top and bottom.

    To assist in fixing the panels together, the edges will be added in a strip of 2" X 2".

    Luigi
     
  11. John Perry
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    John Perry Senior Member

    That's fine Luigi, the inclusion of the approximately 50 * 50 timber at each of the corners makes a big difference. The longitudinal tension and compression due to beam bending moment is going to be carried mainly by those four timbers. The sides, top and bottom panels will mainly serve to hold the corner timbers in position and to carry shear stress between the corner timbers. That being the case there is an argument for aligning the grain of the plywood at 45 degrees to the long axis of the beam, at least on the sides and also on the top and bottom if the beam will ever see high bending moment due to horizontal loads. Cutting the ply that way would however be more complicated and probably require more scarfing together of funny shaped pieces.
     
  12. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    lgenova Junior Member

    Thanks for the information, John.
    I can clearly see what you explained. I'm almost convinced to remake cuts the sides with the grains aligned at 45 degrees, and use what is already cut for firewood barbecue :D. A sheet of plywood good quality 10mm is not more than $ 40 bucks. Absolutely nothing compared to the increased stiffness of the beam.

    Luigi
     
  13. John Perry
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    John Perry Senior Member

    If you really are thinking of scrapping all the plywood you have just cut out, I guess you would like to see some hard figures to get an idea of how much extra strength/stiffness you would gain by doing so. Unfortunately I don't have such figures and I am a bit busy at the moment to try to look into this for you (apart from anything else I am hoping to sneak down to Falmouth to get a look at the C class cats). I guess that a proper analysis would need to be based on laminate theory and take account of the inter layer adhesion as well as the anisotropic properties of wood.

    I know that beams with plywood webs having 45 degree grains have been used in aircraft construction and probably still are used for some light aircraft, so I feel that someone out there must already have the figures, either from analysis and/or from load testing sample assemblies. Does anyone here know where to look for this information?

    I would say that since I am vaguely considering a wood boat building project myself, good quality 10mm ply for under $40 per sheet sounds pretty good to me. UK prices seem to be higher but I havent yet looked at prices for larger quantities, say 100 sheets.

    John
     
  14. lgenova
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    lgenova Junior Member

    As electronic engineer, my knowledge in mechanical vector is limited to college classes, which is taking me to review some information on diagrams of shear forces and bending moment on a beam in my old books, which is not at all practical.

    Luigi
     

  15. PHTCA
    Joined: Jul 2013
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    PHTCA Junior Member

    OS7, even i have not received plans from you, i do have B28 plans, and if i could get B33 better, but, i am trying to convert my B28 plans to electronic, and trting to get all material list to be sure i can get almost all components here (I know the mast must be imported or buy used here). Remember, my first choice is fiberglass bacause i can get it in the corner. But, it will be GOOD to have a record of all builder because we can share information and questions, if somebody is building now.
     
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