Bruce Kirby

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by James Mills, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. James Mills
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    James Mills Junior Member

    Does anyone know how to get in touch with Bruce Kirby. His web site is pretty lacking on contact info or getting more info on some of his plans. He designed (one was built) and intersting 43' sailing sharpie that I would like more info on.

    Suggestions????

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    James Mills
     
  2. Pericles
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

  3. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    The boat you are interested in was built by Sea Island Boatworks in Charleston, SC. The chief builder there is Mark Bayne. Nice boat that would stand upright on the bottom on the keel plus two rudder skegs. A bit strange in that this traditional looking boat was rigged with two B&R masts.

    Several photos at: http://www.seaislandboatworks.com/boats/lena2.htm
     
  4. James Mills
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    James Mills Junior Member

    What's B&R Masts??

    Yes, I saw the pictures on their web site. That is what sparked my interest in the boat.

    I'm going to build something in the next few years but I don't know what. I cruised down the West coast of Central America and then another trip through the Bahammas years ago. Wife is gone. I'm itching to go cruising again, however, I don't even know if it is going to be power or sail. I have a place on a creek that has pretty good water depth but there is a bridge between me and the bay. Maybe a sharpie with tabernacle masts that I could take to Belize in the winter. Still building my shop for now and getting my ducks in a row for some projects. I have mold board and vacuuming bagging experience and building a plywood design in composite panels really appeals to me. I found that I really hate sanding and fairing. Just researching and dreaming for now. Once I decide on a design, I'll build the dingy for it first. Dingies are really important.
     
  5. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: Oriental, NC

    tom28571 Senior Member

    B&R is Bergstrom and Ridder and they are mostly used on racing boats. Small cross section masts and usually at least double swept spreaders.

    Send me an email and I will send you a couple photos of the mast and underbody.
     
  6. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    James Mills,

    Fairing can be minimised thus.

    http://duckworksmagazine.com/03/r/articles/glass/bottom.htm

    I've experimented with bending S & G epoxy/ply composite panels into place onto a strongback. It's not as hard as trying to weld rusty air. :D :D Actually, it's very easy and as the panels are easily laid up horizontally, both faces are immaculate. Attach peelply to the edges of the inner face and you won't need to sand before bonding and filleting. Preplanning the work produces perfect projects.

    Good luck,

    Pericles
     

  7. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Bruce Kirby, designer, three-times Olympian, and sailing journalist dies at 92yrs.
    Bruce Kirby, best known as the designer of the Laser, now known as the ILCA, has passed away at the age of 92yrs.

    The Laser was renamed the ILCA after a copyright dispute with the European based manufacturer of the class. It features a one-design hull, foils, but multiple rigs. As well as the Olympic singlehander, the ILCA is also used at Youth World Championships level for both male and female sailors, albeit it with standard or reduced sized rigs.

    Sailing was a constant presence in his life, and he was good at it, Kirby jumped from the International 14 into the Finn class to sail for Canada in the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, where he became friendly with Paul Elvstrom, the Dane who won three consecutive Olympic golds in that class. Kirby skipped the 1960 Rome Olympics when he and his wife, Margo had their two daughters, but he returned to the Finn class at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, in Enoshima - venue for Tokyo 2020.

    For Bruce Kirby's self-penned story of how the Laser came about click here.

    For Part 1 of a two-part interview with Bruce Kirby click here and for Part 2 click here.

    For the full interview in Soundings Online click here.​

    [​IMG]
    The innate simplicity of Bruce Kirby's Laser design was a key factor in its success.
    Gintare Scheidt (LTU) practicing in the squall ahead of the Laser Radial Medal Race - Rio 2016 -
    photo © Richard Gladwell / Photosport
     
    bajansailor likes this.
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