Bronze and Steel

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Darkranger85, Apr 27, 2010.

  1. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Most of the plans I have seen call for bronze screws and bolts.

    Simple question: Can you substitute them for Stainless Steel?

    Thanks ahead of time!
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If they are below the waterline, absolutely no. You will get crevice corrosion
     
  3. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Bronze or monel only below the waterline if you wish to have the boat last any length of time (20+ years). On the other hand, vessels of limited commerical life (i.e. fishing boats) are often built heavy and fastened with iron or hot dipped steel and then just thrown away in 10-15 years when the coatings fail and the wood gets iron sick. Not every wooden boat is a classic yacht.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2010
  4. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    How long would a canoe or kayak last using lesser bolts and such?

    If it matters, the boat will only be used in fresh water.
     
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Bananas

    If the steel screws are truly galvinized with zinc, not cadmium they will last longer. Don't get cad plated screws that are sometimes passed off as galvanized. Stainless will last a long time in FRESH water. Use wood preservative to protect wood against dry rot. Don't let it stay in a wet condition when idle or it will rot.
     
  6. Lurvio
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Lurvio Mad scientist

    I don't know about the America and Australia but here in northern Europe there are a lot of different kinds of Stainless in sale. Also kinds that are rated as sea water proof.
     
  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    And none of them exist for long when they are not in contact with oxygen!
    As Gonzo mentioned, crevice corrosion is the issue.
    SS is for handrails etc. but fasteners should be either Bronce / Monel, or hot dipped galvanized mild steel.

    For a canoe and such, why not going for epoxy and glue all the stuff instead of inviting water ingress through fasteners?

    Regards
    Richard
     
  8. Darkranger85
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Is that just as strong as using fasteners?
     
  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Stronger.
     
  10. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Sweet! Is there somewhere that has really good tutorials on how to do that kind of thing?

    Since the plans have screws and bolts in them I'd have no idea how to go about doing that instead.
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

  12. dskira

    dskira Previous Member


    I apologize, I miss your post.
    If on fresh water go with SS even active.
    But the price for the fastening for a kayak is not realy high to avoid bronze.
    And Richard gave you some good link.
    Some manufacturer sell bronze screw for little. The probleme of price for bronze is when you go to the carriage bolt and hex bolt.
    You have no electrolisis in fresh water, just don't use oak, use ash.
    Daniel
     
  13. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    Ok, the epoxy resin that you use with the fiberglass tape. Is that the same as the epoxy you can get at home depot and other stores like that or do you have to get special stuff from a marine supply kind of store?
     
  14. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Take care, there is some stuff on the market in the US which is named "Glassfiber Epoxy" or so (if I remember well it is from 3M), thats just polyester.

    No, you do not need to buy expensive stuff, just make sure you buy real Epoxy.

    For a canoe or day boat of the size you are planning, every resin (EP) is sufficient, or good.

    Regards
    Richard

    come back here with questions before you start wasting money!!!
     

  15. Darkranger85
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Darkranger85 Junior Member

    One thing I would like to say is thank you all for being so helpful.

    I have been to many forums for many different topics and so often people will make you feel like a stupid idiot for asking questions they feel you should know already.

    You guys have been very helpful! :)

    I'm hoping to start today when my father gets home.

    We have no suitable "workshop" area and we rent so it's not really an option.

    Its a little cool today with some wind, any advice on that cause I was reading some of the tutorials and such and it mentioned that temperature and such plays a part.
     
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