Broken Boom

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Manie B, Oct 17, 2009.

  1. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I get tired of these horror stories. A broken boom is not a major problem. He is just one more unprepared idiot.
     
  3. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Most yachts I've seen can sail under jib alone if necessary.... or can fire up the motor.

    And can someone explain to me what a yacht is doing off the north coast of Australia with only a two-day reserve of fresh water? Or why its captain would take off single-handed with only a single electric autopilot and no backup system?
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Bad luck he made it this time! So we have a chance to meet him in the future. Watch out north of OZ!
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Helmsman

    Darwin. This guy is the exception who proves the rule of Survival of the fittest...
     
  6. BHOFM
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    I think you could get a lot out of the main without the
    boom.

    Wonder if he knows which end is the front?
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I think a lot is made of the boom, which doesn't seem to be his big problem. His major difficulties were that he didn't have a clue and relied on his self steering gear. When it went down, he felt he must remain at the helm, which just isn't the case. He could have easily hove off, run before a warp, etc. and gone below and had a meal, which would have returned his energy and more importantly his wits. His panic, caused a downward spiral that he was unable to recover from. In a few more days, the gulls would have had a good look at his eye balls. Without the technology, he was helpless. In other words, he wasn't a sailor and in a position where only a sailor should dare venture.
     
  8. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    God bless the French.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I recently made an eight day passage without an autopilot. It slowed me down having to lash the tiller and find a sail combination that kept the course. However, it is not that hard.
     
  10. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    Stupid question; There are classes, books and other sources of training/ knowledge which would prepare someone like the above non-sailor, right?

    People just buy boats and take off in them all the time?
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Not really. You can read for years, but it doesn't prepare you for the shock of physical danger. Some people can never deal with it and just panic. I suppose the only way is to start small and see if you can take it. It is full of people that think they handle situations like those because they read a lot of magazines and took a boating safety class.
     
  12. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Hard to argue with that.

    Still, it's often said that of the approx. 90% of the population who will instinctively react the wrong way when put in a crisis situation, only the bottom 10% are truly screwed- the rest can learn to handle it and solve the problem, if given appropriate training and practice before heading out.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I think that the mental and emotional training is the most important. A person that can stay cool in a dangerous situation will make better decision even without experience in that particular emergency. The survival and cruising training, in my opinion, lack enough emphasis in that point. Panic may be an instinctive reaction to a "no way out" problem, but a logical approach and preplanning are better.
     
  14. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    With your luck Gonzo, I'm surprised this has never happened to you! :eek:
     

  15. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Breaking a boom? I've done that.
     
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