Brightside or Jamestowns Total boat wet edge one part polyurethane

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Steve W, Aug 18, 2018.

  1. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Does anyone here have experience with both of these products and have insight on how they compare. I have some painting to do on the inside of my cabin sides and would like to use a one part paint. I have painted a few hulls with Brightside and really like it as a product and would use it in a heartbeat except they don't show it in oyster white while total boat wet edge does.
    Thanks in advance for any experience you can share.

    Steve.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Being one-pack PU, it should be able to be tinted, if you take the colour chip of the "oyster white" to a decent paint shop, they have colour analysers that can identify what the constituent colours are, fairly accurately, and should be able to supply the small amount of tinters required. I'd say buy a bit more tint than is required for the paint volume, that way you can add more if the colour is too light for your liking. Yellow ochre features in a great many light creamy colours, sometimes the only pigment added. Sometimes there will be a little black, or even violet added in. But the paint shop should be able to identify the additives to a white base, the paint you are tinting should be as close to stark white as possible. It won't be 100% accurate no matter what you do, because paint brands vary in pigment strength and the colour of the resin base also affects the final colour.
     
  3. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    I use Brightside. My favorite color is Seattle Grey. No that's not a pun or a joke. They actually make that color. I use it on the inside of my rowboat. Interlux Brightside Seattle Gray Quart - Star Marine Depot https://www.starmarinedepot.com/interlux-brightside-seattle-gray-quart.html I also use their Medium Blue and the Yellow. The Medium Blue is on the outside of the rowboat. Still looks good after about five years. I use the yellow on my 18 ft Sea Ray. The yellow has faded in the bright sun we have had this summer. But it has been on the fore deck of my Sea Ray for about five years now. Still looks good though.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The thread title got me thinking about the difficulties of maintaining a "wet edge" with fairly fast drying paints, when brush or roller painting over a broad front. PU dries pretty quickly.
     
  5. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    I don't want to get into tinting as it is just for the inside of the cabinsides of my Gemini cat. Its a fairly large area though, probably about 18" by 40ft around and the colour is dictated by the outside which I did last year and painted over into the window openings before installing the new windows so I will have minimal masking when I get to the inside. I used Quantum 99 2 pack polyurethane on the outside in oyster white hence the colour requirement for the inside. As I said I would use Brightside in a heartbeat if they had the colour. I have done a 36ft Chris Craft, hull and decks and a 47ft Luders yawl hull with Brightside and it is a very easy to use paint. Jamestowns Wet edge seems to be a direct competitor and they do have it in oyster white but having no experience with it I was hoping I might find someone who has used both and can offer an opinion. I could go to any paint store and have them match the colour with whatever comparable paint they sell but I just can't see it flowing and having the outstanding gloss of Brightside. Normally I wouldn't do gloss for something like this but in the course of the restoration I beefed up the ridiculously flimsy cabinsides with a 1/2" of plywood epoxied to the inside of the fiberglass (Which at this size should have been cored) which stiffened the whole thing up and pulled it flat so the many stress crack repairs around the cabinside to deck transition have a fighting chance and the rather large windows have a flat surface (vertically) to mount to, and I was able to completely update the window shapes inside and out and of course I now have a nice fair inside surface to paint so i'm going with gloss.
     
  6. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    The one part paints like Brightside are much easier to use in this respect. I have found that the very thin yellow foam rollers that West systems sell work well as they don't hold much paint and a pocket full of foam brushes for tipping off that you chuck as soon as they start to load up works well for me.
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If you are painting inside, there isn't much need for either gloss or PU, and it might be the case that if the old finish inside is an alkyd, the PU might not adhere that well, but I don't know that for sure, in this case, though I do know 100% PU does not really stick well to old alkyd. Odours can linger in confined spaces, and if intending to be on board as soon as painted, a low odour alternative might appeal more.
     
  8. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    As I explained in post #5 above I would normally not choose gloss but in this case I am painting new plywood that is smooth and fair and very easy to do with nothing in the way to paint around. At this point it has no primer so I can choose any paint I want. As I said, I have used Brightside before and it would be my first choice if they had my colour hence the interest in Jamestowns Wet edge paint which seems to be very similar chemically. I just replaced a major structural (chainplate)bulkhead in a customers 39 ft racing sail boat at work and when we were done one of the painters came in and painted it with Brightside and it looked fantastic, he had never used it before and was very impressed. Im a boatbuilder, not a painter and when I have tried any other house type paints alkyd or have never found them as easy to use or achieve the results I can get with Brightside so am reluctant to start experimenting now. As I said I used 2 pack on the exterior but it is very expensive and not needed inside.
    Still hoping for someone with actual experience with Wet edge to respond, I would expect there would be many in the US north east that have used both paints.
     

  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Go for it Steve, but tinting paint is dead easy, if you have the colour you want to duplicate.
     
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