braided on an anchor shackle then dipped it in acrylic paint

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by sdowney717, Jul 11, 2015.

  1. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I was thinking it might help it stay together better, maybe less fraying as it ages? Me not being a perfect braider, but it should still function ok. I was also thinking of whipping the end tucks with some small line. I even though about putting a piece of shrink wrap tubing on this. What do you think?

    [​IMG]

    half inch line and galvanized shackle. Then dipped in a bucket of white gloss acrylic paint and let it drip dry. Each strand is still soft but not as loose feeling as before, the paint has stiffened the rope a little. I was wondering if the paint might increase pulling apart resistance, less likely for the tucks to pull out, not that any of my line braids have done so.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    What type of line is it? There's a product used for coating tool handles that would work and of course truck bed liner too. I don't know of any acrylic that would tolerate immersion for long, other then the two part acrylic urethanes, which likely are flexible enough to put up with this treatment for long. If the paint was applied before you weaved it up, preferably before the paint was fully cured, then you might gain a very modest amount of additional friction and inter-strand contact. Over coating a previously weaved splice will not do much in this regard. Whipping the tucks is a good idea and helps bind things down. Whipping over freshly applied paint will improve things a little.
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    I think it will make the rope last longer, but the term used should be rope eye, not anchor shackle.
     
  4. Barry
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    Barry Senior Member

    The metal part is called a thimble
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Actually it's a "rode" eye splice, around a thimble, if on ground tackle.
     
  6. Barry
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    Barry Senior Member

    he had called the galvanized thimble a shackle, was not referring to the whole assembly
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    How about some hot melt glue to help it stay together ?
     
  8. Smaland
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    Smaland New Member

    From yur galvanized shackle the best coating is galvanized chain line is good make braid tight and check line an rot around thimble
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    So we both called it wrong. :eek: :eek: :)
     
  10. Barry
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    Barry Senior Member

    The galvanized piece is a thimble and Par called the whole assembly what it is.

    The purpose of the thimble is to allow a metal hookup to the rope without wearing out the rope at the eye, say a screw pin anchor shackle or a round pin anchor shackle or turnbuckles or a myriad of other options.

    Additionally, rope strength can be diminished due to the sharp bend if you do not use a thimble, due to uneven loading across the cross section of the rope, ie all strands are not loaded evenly

    I would not have coated it with anything, fearing that when the load goes on the paint might actually act as a bit of a lubricant and not let the compression of the strands grip the others properly.

    Of course if the loading is much below the max working load, it probably does not matter.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Search "whipping a rope" and you will find videos on how to do it.
     
  12. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Supposedly the rope has 5,000 lb limit, and highly unlikely to get there.
    Yeah, dont know if dried acrylic paint would act as a lubricant under heavy load, I was thinking the opposite. It wont be underwater long enough for the paint to come off, I have used acrylics underwater on the hull and they did not come off. I just wanted to experiment, it did glue it together a little bit, but I could still take it all apart if desired. Rope is made of many tiny nylon fibers and this has glued them together a little in each plait strand so they are more consolidated which might make easier to do the braid, say painting the strands first. What I am trying to say, it lost any fuzziness on each rope plait.
    Yes, thimble not shackle is correct name.

    The anchor line I lost, I saturated the braid with PL Premium polyurethane construction adhesive and it never had any trouble with it. I did that because I had fewer tucks than this one. A few more tucks is always better than fewer.
     
  13. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    It looks okay, but no style points. It's worth learning to make a tapered splice. I can't tell for sure from the photo, but the nylon looks like it might be soft spun stuff. You really want to buy purpose made anchor nylon that has a medium lay and less stretch. The real concern for the soft, spun stuff is it popping off the thimble. Also, the thimble should be a heavy duty type, preferably a closed loop for hand splicing. Heavy duty has a deeper groove. I don't think you need to worry about it unraveling, just popping off the thimble.

    I'd put a whipping on it at the thimble and at the end. You can lock the line to the thimble with a few turns. Every little bit helps.


    [​IMG]


    closed heavy duty thimble -

    http://www.svb24.com/en/content/custom-rigging.html
     
  14. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I dont know soft spun? Maybe so, I was thinking anchor line, but this is a secondary line, not my primary anchor. I will uses this with a small anchor like when fishing.
    I bought this on Amazon.
    Here is the rope.
    100 feet, I paid $25.91

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005TLVQ0I?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00

    breaking strength of various nylon rope
    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/nylon-rope-strength-d_1513.html

    I wonder if this 1/2 inch nylon rope is 5700 lbs like that web site says? I have experience with nylon ropes for many years, and this one feels the same as they all do.
     

  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    A number of the reviewers on Amazon state that when they received the rope the fine print on it described it as a blend of nylon and polyester. And when they tried to return the rope they were told it was a ineligible for return. Needless to say, they aren't happy campers.
     
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