Boxy Fisher Catamaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Fanie, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    The first axle is in. I'm still waiting for the cone to be delivered :( They have been delivering it since last week thursday. The jig now extends well beyond the workshop.

    When one day I receive the cone I can finally finish the basic jig. I guess a couple of days more. I have to add the sections guides still.

    The sections can be drawed and cut next.
     

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  2. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Are you looking at a production run of several hundred? - looking good...
     
  3. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Sure Mas, but please just not today :D
    I moved the jig out of the workshop by my lonesome self, you can see how.
    My arms are pretty thin on the moment.
    Am I getting too old for this **** :rolleyes:

    Nah. I'll grow up when I'm 200.
     

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  4. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    The cone just arrived. I'll attache that when I do the axle's. I'm impressed with how well the 'axle's' fit. They are 204mm pipes and you can almost hear the wind squeeze out when I slide them out. I made the holes 1mm larger at 205mm.

    I also made some changes to the glass feeder, it is going to work better and should better the wetout as well as the glass / resin ratio.

    I also decided to make a transverse distance indicator to help one wind the glass up more even.

    I'm just glad it's this far, it's been quite a job. I must say I'm quite happy with the way the jig turned out so far.
     

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  5. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    This is probably what took the most time. Each joint had to be grinded smooth and these strips welded around. The joints are the weakest point, and if the jig gets loaded there must be no chance of it giving anywhere.

    The jig was designed to bend 8mm in the center with a 1600kg load, courtesy of one of my engineering friends. Hopefully the hulls won't come near that weight, but there has to be a safety margin. The fish bone is also probably going to weigh a couple of kilo's. (pounds for the US guys ;))
     

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  6. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

  7. Richard Atkin
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: Wellington, New Zealand

    Richard Atkin atn_atkin@hotmail.com

    Fanie...ummmm....how does it work?
     
  8. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    The profiles are fitted on this jig. The glass gets wound all round except aft. When the hull cured you pull the jig out, disassemble the profiles to go back on the jig for the next hull.

    The deck and hulls are one solid construction. I don't like them joined.
     
  9. Richard Atkin
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: Wellington, New Zealand

    Richard Atkin atn_atkin@hotmail.com

    wow. i've never seen this technique before. this will be very interesting to watch!
     
  10. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Can't wait to watch it myself :D

    The beams a few pages back was made this way, and it works well and fast. There were a few problems that came up but since it's a new way to do this I make improvements and adjustments as I go along. If it works then great. Worst case I cut it up and sell as scrap metal :eek:
     
  11. DocScience
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada

    DocScience Wishful builder

    sketch of boat

    Fanie;
    Thankyou for all your pictures.
    I still have no idea exactly what the finished boat might look like.
    Is there any chance that you can give a brief drawing of what the boat might look like ??
    I have not been following this thread and have not been able to read everything yet.

    I think a lot of readers would really like a brief sketch if possible.

    Thankyou.
     
  12. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Hey Doc, sorry for the late response, I'm tied up with all kinds of things.

    Lots of requests for it but I have to find time to sit and to it, and that is a bit of a problem. I was going to go fishing for the easter weekend (I have serious extraction symptoms altready) and then couldn't go, it rained all weekend, and in the end I didn't do much all weekend long :( Worst is the guys that could go came back and they had a ball with the fish.

    Just be patient for a bit longer, it will come together soon.
     
  13. Richard Atkin
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: Wellington, New Zealand

    Richard Atkin atn_atkin@hotmail.com

    Well Fanie, if anything breaks when you put it on the ocean, it shouldn't sink.....and you will probably fix it and make it stronger....so I guess it shouldn't be a total disaster. Gotta say though - a lot of people would be nervous to take on a challenge like this without a very detailed plan. I like your bravery.
     
  14. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    This is my fourth year working on it already, what makes you think I don't know where I'm going ?

    There are more to this than meets the eye. I have to test all the unknowns and make sure what I do is right. It takes time and money, and before I can do anything I have to earn the money to put the next thing together.

    There is no chance the boat will break. It will also be unsinkable.

    But thanks for the vote of confidence there.
     

  15. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Senior Member

    It is good that it is too big and bulky for Mr. Philemon to steal it.
     
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