boom vang

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Pieetry, Mar 10, 2003.

  1. Pieetry
    Joined: Nov 2002
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    Location: california

    Pieetry Junior Member

    Im looking for a new vang system to free up sum deckspace on my dingy. Ive tried looking into the vang systems of 29ers, but i cant find any good information on the internet and i dont know any ones regulary sailed near by.... so anyways i came up with this idea, please excuse the roughness of it.



    Basicly what im trying to show there is the vang is made of two bars, one to the mast, and one to the boom, and a pully system which tryes to pull them straight and ther by pushing the boom down. the sail is cut into two parts and the system fits inside it. or if i cant get a new sail, put one of thes on each side.

    the boat is an NS14 here in the states

    thanks for any advice/info u may have
     

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  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    NS14 Boom Vang

    The NS14 looks to be quite a nice dinghy. There is not much on the class website about gear improvements (Do a Yahoo search for NS14). I personally sail a LARK, which is roughly the same size, but slightly taller and a little heavier. I'm currently using a 12 purchase Vang, with a cascade pulley to increase that to 24. 24 is certainly the upper limit. but that system does take up space. It rockets upwind with vang on though! as I suspect the NS14 would as well. Therefore, whatever system you use, bear in mind what sort of force you want to exert. As far as the rod system goes, it's an interesting idea. Don't put it inside the sail though, firstly it will make the sail hard to remove, and secondly it will shred the sail if the control line (or cleat) fails for any reason. If you go for this system, don't forget to prevent the bars going over-center, and you'll probably need some form of multi-pulley system on the control line, but this could be run vertically on the mast. I'd love to here what happens.

    Good Luck,

    Tim B
     
  3. Polarity
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Polarity Senior Member

    Hi Pieetry
    Why not just fix one end on a pivot and slide the other end with a multi-pulley system...
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    How about an upside down short sprit with snotter? Attach one end to the boom and the snotter to the mast. It would not interfere with the present arrangement.
     
  5. Polarity
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Polarity Senior Member

    dammit wurs ma copy of Hand, Reef and Steer....

    Ok give in wot's a snotter (apart from a small child with "tramlines..")
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    I hope this makes it easier to understand.
     

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  7. b14maniac
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    Location: Canberra, Australia

    b14maniac Junior Member

    As an ex-NS14 sailor, mate don't try the gnav (upside-down vang) on an NS. The rotating mast alone makes it impossible, unless you are running a fixed rig (wouldn't surprise me... can't be many NS's in the US). I tried it using a complicated series of levers and cams and it broke not long after I got it to work. That snotter idea looks good though... I never thought about that.
     
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