bonding to wooden hull

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Lunde, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. Lunde
    Joined: Jun 2005
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Portugal

    Lunde Junior Member

    Hey! I am just starting on the interior on a newly built wooden hull, and I am just wondering if it is absolutely common to bond cleats and plywood, when making all the interior stuff, to the actual hull, the planks?Because if and when a plank must be replaced everything that is bonded to it must go...I know that all bulkheads should not touch the planks, because of structure damage, but apparently it should still be bonded with epoxy and cloth,- as my planks run the boats length without cuts, I can only imagine the amount of pieces of furniture it would affect if a plank has to be removed.....please HELP!
     
  2. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,414
    Likes: 58, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Interiors

    What kind of constuction is it? Are there frames? Are there floors? Is there a cabin sole? Unless interior bulkheads are structural, they should be removeable as with all interior joinery. There are designs where interior furniture is part of the structure, but from the nature of your questions, this is not the case. You may not have much choice but to apply cleats to the hull. I would use the cleats on the cabin sole and under decks and use frames before using the hull directly. Then screw attach the furnishings to the cleats to make it removeable. Depending on the size of the boat, you could ceil over the frames, if there are any, and attach the cleats to the ceiling.

    Good luck.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,881
    Likes: 1,255, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Structural bulkheads must be bonded or fastened to the hull. What do you mean they don't touch?
     
  4. Lunde
    Joined: Jun 2005
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Portugal

    Lunde Junior Member

    My boat has wooden frames, only about 6 inches between each one.I ougth to be able avoid fastening to the planks.Structural bulkheads, I am told, should be half an inch from the hull, and fastened to the frames and to the planks with epoxy and cloth...is it bullocks?
    Another solution I have to come up with, is the placing of the sole.In my case, I have to access the bilge , not from the center of the bilge, but from the sides, because of a continous maststep that goes all along the bilge.
    So, is it possible,( and how!?) for me to fasten, for example a settee, not to the sole, but to the frames, using the frames as a horisontal base for the settee.This way I could make the sole completely so it can be lifted, and access the bilge.
    I mean, ┬┤how important is it to have access all along the bilge, from aft to fore?I could also just have access 6 ft for example.
     

  5. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,414
    Likes: 58, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    furniture

    Lunde,

    Need more information on your boat.

    How big is your boat? (Length overall, waterline length, max. beam and waterline beam)

    What type of construction is it? (Traditional carvel or lapstrake, modern epoxy strip-built, cold-molded, lapstrake or stitch and glue)
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.