Bolts for Steel Keel - Bronze? Hot Dipped Galvanized?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Jeff in Boston, Feb 24, 2021.

  1. Jeff in Boston
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    Location: Boston

    Jeff in Boston Junior Member

    @Rumars

    Agreed that bilgeboards would be better and dampening rolling. I don't think I will have to add those, but it is possible.

    The boat was designed to rest most of it's weight on a 2200 lb keel that extends a certain length. I figure a keel that weighs 800 lbs that extends a bit farther back won't be an issue, especially if I put in some fiberglass in the rear between the hull and plate keel to avoid any bending loads. Do you think I am missing something here?

    You are right that doing it in the water isn't smart. I'll skip that. But it is important that I be able to check the bolts without dropping the keel and breaking the sealant.

    For the stainless bolts... you expect they will be fine as long as I keep them dry? In this design the bottom of the bolt heads are about 1.5" up from the very bottom so they shouldn't actually be wet very often.
     
  2. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    You are looking at it the wrong way. The boat was designed to have a 2200lbs keel suspended from the hull at a certain place, and that point is reinforced for taking bolts. You are planing to put bolts and suspend weight in parts of the boat that are not designed for it. Yes it can be done with suitable reinforcing (floors), but why? Use the whole ballast allowance for batteries and payload, and glass on a pair of bilgeboards or a skeg.
    When trailering the boat will sit exactly on the original reinforced part anyway, it's the lowest part of the hull. If you are so concerned you can even fit a pad in the form of the old keelshape to the trailer. The fiberglass does not care what's underneath, cast iron, wood, rock, etc.
     
  3. Jeff in Boston
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    Location: Boston

    Jeff in Boston Junior Member

    I was planning on bolting *only* to the original keel reinforcement pad/recess. It is about 86" long. The original keel was about 100" long, swept back. I can't see how going to a 120" or 140" long keel that weighs less than the original would be a problem.

    See: Keel and Keel Bolt Photos - Pearson 26 (pfeiffer.net) for details.

    That said if I can fit enough ballast low enough your idea of skipping the outboard keel does have merit. I could bolt on a large skeg using the existing rudder hole.
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Where is the rudder going?
     
  5. Jeff in Boston
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    Location: Boston

    Jeff in Boston Junior Member

    I plan to use the motor tiller instead of rudder.
     
  6. Jeff in Boston
    Joined: Sep 2020
    Posts: 39
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    Location: Boston

    Jeff in Boston Junior Member

    I plan to use the motor tiller instead of rudder for a few reasons:

    1) To sell the existing rudder / tiller which is worth more than the boat separately.

    2) The existing rudder is way too long /deep after the keel is removed.

    3) I want the space in the cockpit as the existing tiller is really long.

    4) I will have a motor tiller anyways.

    5) I figure (might be wrong!) that the steering authority will be higher on the motor than on a separate rudder.
     
  7. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    Well, you do waht you must. If you use plain steel bolts, paint them with epoxy primer and paint before installing.
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    There isn't really a market for an old rudder.
     

  9. Jeff in Boston
    Joined: Sep 2020
    Posts: 39
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    Location: Boston

    Jeff in Boston Junior Member

    The rudder I have is a new aftermarket replacement from d & r. I'm not worried about being able to sell it.
     
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