BOL D'OR 2018

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Doug Lord, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Check this boat out-and the following caption:


    Mono hull speedster-bol dor 2018.jpg The Hungarian Libera Taxiphone Premium Raffica blocked by Zsolt Kiraly showed up at the buoy Bouveret at 19:08. He rolled up the barge du Bouveret after 9 hours and 8 minutes of racing. The Hungarians on their scaled Libera led the race at the top of the monohulls from the start playing the equilibrists in the light weather and standing right in the wake of the D35s. The formidable Magyar had won the bowl of Vermeil in 2016. They are followed a short distance by TBS and 100 Skies.

    In the TCF2 category, the Egger leads the way in front of Eole 7 and Wanted at the entrance to Haut-Lac.
     
  3. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  4. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    The Gonet Monofoiler was second in its class and 34th overall.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2018
  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    BOL D'OR 2018: (Gonet Monofoiler at 1:25 in)
     
  6. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

  7. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    The only time I actually saw Rafica race, their sailing skills looked much higher than the other Liberas, but that class has largely been killed by the cats and by their own excesses. The Pharos 40s appear to go almost as well with less effort, and these days the cats are much, much faster (although they still looked surprisingly sticky when it got glassy). It's a pity to see the Libera classes have basically died; they looked great back in the day.

    Overall it looks as if "seahuggers" were faster than their foiling competitors in the light conditions. In all but one class, the foilers were at the back of the fleet. Results show the foiling SL33 in 7th in M1, behind six of the slightly larger seahugging 35 foot cats and ahead of five. In the M2 class (multis 28-20ft) conventional boats filled the top 10 placings. The six foilers all finished in the last eight places amongst the M2 cats.

    The Gomet did well for a new boat although it finished about half an hour behind a 28 year old 30 foot mono.

    The Quant 30s were both beaten by the much smaller and older T780 both across the line and on handicap, and were also beaten by several Melges 32s. They came last and fourth last in class - not a good race for them.

    In the C1 class (beach cats) seahuggers took the top places once again, which fits in with what foiling cat sailors were saying at this weekend's regatta here. One of the full-foiling Nacra 20s finished in last place across the line out of the whole fleet, which illustrates how no one can really claim that any single performance proves anything much. Still, at least they hung in there. A heavy Nacra Formula 18 was in third and ahead of all the bigger, newer carbon foilers - a great effort.

    I see the Mirabaud foiler was running last in class and then didn't finish.

    It's interesting that the top two monos belong to defunct extreme classes that some people once pointed to as the future of the sport, while by far the largest class is the little Surprise (sort of like a J/24) with about 120 entries!
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2018
  8. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    The Gonet Monofoiler was 2nd in class and 34th overall out of 349 boats. Just her second race.
     
  9. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    ...and I said it did well for a new boat.

    The overall placing for a boat like that is irrelevant when the vast majority of other competitors are older and slower. Of course a new 28'er with trapezes beat 300 Surprises and similar boats - it would be a bad show if it didn't. One may as well make a big deal about the fact that we beat trailerable yachts and Optis in our F18.
     
  10. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

  11. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ---------------------------------
    No, its not irrelevant! This was a phenomenal race for the Monofoiler not just because it was their 2nd race since being launched but because the boat is designed as a foiler! There is lots commentary about how the foilers did poorly because of the light air-hogwash. If a foiler did poorly in these conditions it was a design problem not a characteristic of a "foiler"-and the Gonet Monofoiler proves this beyond a shadow of a doubt. Many newer foilers are being designed to be able to perform well throughout the windrange and the Monofoiler is a perfect example of this new approach.
     
  12. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    Of course you have to take into account the fact that most of the boats the Gomet beat were racer/cruisers or smaller and/or older boats. No objective analysis of performance can ignore facts such as the style and age of the boats that one is using for comparison.Otherwise it's like making a big deal about something like an F18 cat beating a lot of Lasers and Catalina 22s.

    Not only is it illogical to ignore issues like style and age of the boats that are involved, but if you DO ignore such issues then the foilers don't look all that good since they have yet to win a major European lake classic.


    Surely it's simple physics that a foiler has greater wetted surface, all else being equal, and therefore will be slower in light winds. World champs say it, top aerodynamic experts say it, Olympic medallists say it, and results say it. The odd thing is that you claim I'm critical of foilers, and yet here you are criticising boats like the N20s, Easy to Flys by claiming that they had "a design problem".
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2018
    OzFred likes this.
  13. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ===============================
    No, its not so simple:it depends on the design! More and more new foilers are designed to perform well through the whole wind range while some older foilers only perform well when foiling. The Gonet is designed with retractable foils which , apparently ,allows her to be very fast in the lightest air. On the other hand the Quant 23 is designed to effectively foil in very light air -5-6 knots and under that its main foils are also completely retractable. The Vampire Cat also features a 100% retractable main foils(one at a time). Foiler design is changing with more and more emphasis being placed on performing well throughout the whole wind range.
    Again,its not so simple: if a foiler is designed to perform well throughout the wind range then it should not be adversely affected by light air. Most older foilers and some newer foilers were NOT designed to perform well throughout the wind range most races are run in-and they are adversely impacted by light air.
    Light air performance is a design problem that is being addressed by some of the newest foilers around.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  14. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    I had a Beneteau First Class 8 on Lac Leman for a number of years... wind..? what wind?

    Used to leave the office and meet my wife at the pontoon for have a quiet, leisurely drift round the lake until the sun went down.
    The good ol' days before children shattered the tranquility...
     

  15. OzFred
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    OzFred Senior Member

    I guess where the fix is to retract the foils, the boat must carry additional foils for leeway prevention and, in the case of monohulls, additional ballast and keel, making them something of a compromise. A cross–over perhaps?

    So when winds don't favour foilers, the cross–overs will be beaten by the pure non–foilers. And when winds do favour foilers, they'll be beaten by the pure foilers.
     
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