Boat trailer hard to reverse.

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by valvebounce, Jul 15, 2017 at 8:16 PM.

  1. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Underneath the plastic bumper (called a bumper cover) is some metal, actually quite bit of it. Backing a short trailer is all about experience backing things up. What most folks do is make way too big of steering inputs, then play the catch up game, trying to get it to go where they want. This results in a constant seesawing on the steering wheel, usually compounding issues.
     
  2. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hi PAR,as usual,you have got it in one.
    I'm definately out of practice.Years ago I could jump on anything and drive it.
     
  3. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Looks like an good idea, but the same force with a much longer arm results in an huge bending moment in the the spot where the coupling originally is placed, the bending and bouncing there at ± 2:49 to 2:56 in the below video doesn't make me happy . . :oops:

     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's a few tricks to make backing easier. One is to pull forward and get the trailer going in the direction you generally want (right or left), then come to a stop, but just as the car is about to stop, crank the wheel hard over in the opposite direction, before putting it in reverse. When in reverse, crank the wheel back to center or just off and continue backing down. What this trick does is swing the tongue of the trailer in the direction you need, to continue in this direction, while backing down. It becomes automatic after a while, but you have to practice it. Another is to make movements, much like you do when turning normally (forward), try to draw a line making a smooth curve, into the spot you're aiming for. Quick and abrupt steering wheel swings, will make a short trailer jackknife nearly instantly. Smooth, gradual and deliberately slow (until you get better) movements.
     
  5. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    There's always another option . . ;)

    . . . short video version. . .

    . . . long video version. . .

    . . . and there's this one, towing a boat . . .
     
  6. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Must say, looks like excellent steering, but can't see much while going backwards this way with these kind of closed trailers . . o_O

    P.S. - And also don't have much use of the rear view mirrors, to look along the trailer, with the shown method. - ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017 at 8:30 AM
  7. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I can see that method working,in fact I have used it.I think until I get a bit more practice I will use the tractor launch facility at the harbour.
    The trouble is,there's only a five hour tidal window 2.5hrs before high and 2.5hrs after because the harbour dries out at the entrance.
    Then there is the tide cycle,and time factor.I have to tow the boat 70 miles,so getting up at the crack of dawn isn't my favorite pastime,Haha.
    Would you believe,I just want to go fishing.
     
  8. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Some good researching there"A"I don't know how much space you have in Begium for your boat storage,but here in the Uk we live closely packed,like sardines.
    My boat just about fits on my drive.Haha.I have a side passage 4ft wide to my back garden,if I want to weld my trailer I have to turn it on its side and carry it.
    3 man job.
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Yeah I know, some in the UK even have an extra narrow boat for the reasons you named. - :rolleyes:

    In fact this guy even had to trailer that punt to Mexico to get some space for it. - :oops:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017 at 8:07 AM
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Leave" Chilla" alone Angelique, he could become my King in a heartbeat. Incidentally, that video you posted of the beach launch with the long drawbar, was at a place I have launched boats through the surf, many years ago. Interestingly, it was once a place where local fishermen would leave their "dories" high up above the strandline, and launch and retrieve with inflated rubber rollers. Hard work, and no-one pinched any of the outboards or gear left on the boats ! Times have changed. These were old "bondwood" ply boats, and not that light to handle. They had pretty much been replaced by a superior, and somewhat lighter aluminium hull, by the 70's, and with "tea leaves" making leaving valuables unattended too risky, small tractors launched them off road trailers. Even a cheapo tractor was far more capable in the soft sand, than any 4WD of the time. BlisscraftOceaneer_Lines_LRG.jpg
     
  11. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I remember Chas getting a slap when he was at college/.uni in Geelong in Mebourne when I lived in Mebourne many moons ago.
    Haha,the Aussies don't take crap from anyone.( that punt is a bit of a comedown from his ancestors boat that sank in the Thames)
     
  12. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Haha,don't you mean in the lack of a heartbeat?
    Sounds like tea leavery is a worldwide problem.I have to chain my boat up,and use a wheel clamp.When I've launched I use the wheel clamp on the trailer and chain the trailer to the car.All in all it takes time and energy and makes it a long day.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Boat ramp thieves are a problem, some poor devils locally have returned to the ramp and found all the tow vehicle's wheels removed, recently. All such places need video surveillance cams in this day and age.
     

  14. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I had a car stolen a few years back,they had ripped the dash apart to swipe the radio,so,£300 pound damage for a radio they would probably sell for a Tenner.
    Luckily over here,if you use a tractor launch facility,they lock the trailer in a compound.
    Maybe compounds might be the answer.
     
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