Boat Restoration(First Post)

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Monsta, Jul 18, 2005.

  1. Monsta
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Monsta Junior Member

    My very first post.

    I went down to visit some family and my uncle has a boat stored away in his yard. He said I could pick it up but I’m wonderin if it can be restored. It looks to be in good shape but I don’t know jack about boats. I took some pics so anyone could check it out. Can someone point me into the right direction?

    Also can anyone tell what model it is. I didn't have a chance to look for the data plate but I do know that its a "Bayliner" and I've seen those in the malls. :D
     

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  2. Monsta
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    Monsta Junior Member

    Testin 1-2-3
     
  3. Monsta
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    Monsta Junior Member

    Anyone have any advice on this?
     
  4. mmd
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    mmd Senior Member

    Yes, it can be done. No, it won't be inexpensive. The toughest bit will probably be trying to replace the windscreen - finding parts or proper extrusion profiles can be long and frustrating. Upholstery will be v. pricy if you hire someone to do it. If there is hull damage, learn to do the repairs properly. It ain't a car body and repair errors could conceivably kill you. Lotsa books available on the topic (google "marine fiberglass repair") and forums like this will be helpful. Back issues of Professional Boatbuilder (www.proboat.com) will be a wealth of information, too. Have patience and ask more specific questions - if you just ask, "point me in the right direction", some wag will probably (and unfairly) point you to the door.

    Bayliners are the Ford Taurus of the boat world - there's zillions of 'em. On-line parts may be an easy way to go.

    Good luck, have fun...
     
  5. Monsta
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    Monsta Junior Member

    Thank you for the advice.
     
  6. Bob Smalser
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    Bob Smalser Junior Member

    I don't know how this particular boat was cored, but many glass boats have either a balsa or plywood core.

    A common problem is owners who drilled holes whilly-nilly to mount various doodads without sealing those holes properly. When water gets in, the wood beneath rots quickly and repairs involve grinding off the glass and replacing the core....often an uneconomically repairable boat at that point.

    First thing I do is to begin pulling fasteners, especially those that look non-factory. Weeping, black, foul-smelling ooze on my finger after sticking it the hole means I pass on the boat.
     
  7. Monsta
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    Monsta Junior Member

    I looked at it and didnt really see anything modified on it. It juat looked dirty with the leaves and branches in it. I'll def look for that next time though.
     
  8. Monsta
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    Monsta Junior Member

    Anymore advice?
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Boats of that age often have rotten transom, stringers and or cabin soles. Have it inspected by a good surveyor.
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    To be honest, you should walk away from this deal. Boating isn't an inexpensive hobby and this one will need lots of effort (read money) to bring back to serviceable condition. Since, by your own admission, you don't know "jack" then you'd be better off finding a boat that runs, keeps the wet on the outside and will bring you back from farther out on the puddle than you care to swim.

    That said, it looks to need a new sole (floor) probably a new transom, maybe stringers, windscreen pieces, seating and trim. Sitting there like that, you can bet it'll need a battery, the electrical system gone over if not redone, the fuel delivery system gone over if not redone, trailer wheel bearings and other parts, tune up parts and in general a lot more effort from people who do know "jack" about these things. I mention that because you'll have to pay them to do it.

    There are many examples of low cost, minimal equipped, small boats, if you really want to get onto the lake. They aren't going to be free, though, if you look around a bunch, you can stumble onto some really good deals.
     
  11. Monsta
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    Monsta Junior Member

    I'm going to get it inspected and see how bad it is. I'f it is too far gone, I will leave it.
     

  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Monsta, bring over someone who works on these things for a living, not a buddy who is handy and works on his own car.

    I know it's free or there about, but you need an honest answer about the boat.

    If I had it here, I could probably get it running and looking pretty good in a weekend, but I have the tools, know where to find the parts and missing pieces, I'm familiar with the engine and the other systems aboard, knowing where to look for trouble and how to fix when I find them.

    If I was there I could tell you within a few minutes if it was worth your time and generally what needed fixing.
     
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