Boat for Boca

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Tinklespout, Jul 29, 2013.

  1. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    I need some help from y'all again and greatly appreciate it.

    I want to buy, but may have to have built, a cruiser for the Florida intercoastal and sometimes out into the gulf.
    1) ride is important, 2 to three foot chop is common in the bays
    2) fuel efficiency is very important too
    3) safety is utmost
    4) small cabin would be nice

    So, it is between the Tolman Skiff, Nexus St. Pierre and C-Dory. I've not ridden on any of them so I have a few questions for you Experts.

    A) I see conflicting info on the speed I could get out of the St. Pierre. Does anyone have first hand experience on how fast it would go with 2 people and very light load, 50 hp
    B) does the St. Pierre get good mileage
    C) which would be easiest to build?
    D) which would give best ride?
    E) which would be safest in bad weather?
    E) which boat would you choose?

    Again, I appreciate your vast knowledge.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  2. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    ? Best Big Boat for Boca Grand ?

    Suggestions?

    Do I have bad breath or something?
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2013
  3. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    I would go to the local marinas and look around if I were you. See who is using what and don't be shy. Ask some of the locals what works best for them. What you may have is insomnia judging by the time you posted #2. :D
     
  4. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    I've looked and had two inshore boats. It is pretty much down to the boats listed now, or something like them, mostly for fuel economy.
     
  5. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Since you mention the C-Dory I assume a purchased boat is a possibility. In that case consider a "downeast" type such as those built by Eastern, Seaway (division of Eastern) and others.

    I've always thought of the St Pierre dories as displacement boats with their narrow sterns, best suited for speeds of 7 knots or slower. That's based on the designs of John Gardner who wrote about them starting in the 1950's. But I looked at the Nexus website and it appears that their "St Pierre Dory" has a wider and flatter stern than Gardner's, and perhaps would be better described as a dory skiff. http://www.nexusmarine.com/st_pierre_hull.html
     
  6. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    David,

    Thanks so much for your help!

    For some time I have been looking at Pangas, Tolman skiffs and a few others for the fuel economy. I moved into the tolman for the small cabin.

    I didn't realize that the Downeast boats exhibited some of the same qualities; flat or rounded stern, pilot house cabin, fuel economy.

    The good thing is that there are a lot more of them around.

    Are there any brands in particular that designed around fuel efficiency? I understand that this is a relatively new concern.

    Thanks again.

    Kim
     
  7. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Check out some of the plans presented by the Designers on this forum. There are several that will fit your requirements with (build) backup support to boot. This in itself is worth the price of a set of plans.
     
  8. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

  9. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    USCG hasn't used any Bartenders for a long time.
     
  10. DCockey
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

  11. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If fuel efficiency is the aim, you have to sacrifice one of two things, either speed or comfort, you can't have both and have a fuel miser.
     
  12. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    I'll sacrifice speed. I just want to go fast enough to beat the waves following me in from offshore. What should I go for in that case?

    Otherwise, cruising along at 15 to 20 mph is fine for me.

    Kim
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You can cruise at 15-20 mph in "average" offshore conditions, but you will be bashed about in anything that gets, say 10 mpg. There are heaps of aluminium boats in the 4.5-5 metre range here in Oz that are quite seaworthy that will get near that kind of fuel figure with a 40hp DFI or four stroke engine, but it won't be kind to the body a lot of the time, especially if you are talking more than a handful of miles involved. But they can run coastal bars so far as staying with waves is concerned, but still too small to be going through them on a regular basis.
     
  14. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    For first hand information on C-Dorys the C-Brats forum is an excellent resource.
    They are economical and seaworthy but you have to slow down in the chop due to their minimal dead rise of about 5* at the transom..
     

  15. pcfithian
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Long Beach, Indiana

    pcfithian Junior Member

    I can highly recommend a Tolman Jumbo. We've used ours for 3 seasons and it has proved outstanding, we regularly see 3.75+ MPG at 20 MPH on our GPS. Just repainted the hull to Seafoam.

    See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tolman_Skiff
     

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