boat design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by kaid, Feb 4, 2015.

  1. kaid
    Joined: Feb 2015
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    Location: Australia

    kaid Junior Member

    HI GUYS New to this site and would like to build a boat 10/12ft long a cross between a motor canoe and dinghy made of plywood which could be transported on roof rakes but don't seem to be able to find the design that's suitable. will be fitting a small outboard. I've been to most of the internet sites with no luck and hoping someone might be able to point me in the right direction
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A design that's suitable, will be determined by where you want to use it, how much you want to carry in it, in the way of people and payload, and what you intend to do in it, such as fish, etc. You will need to specify that kind of detail, to get a meaningful answer.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Look at the various sites that offer plans for this type of thing. Atkins, Bateau and CLC are the first logical places, but there are many others.

    Some simple in my head stuff suggests a plain old flat bottom, square stern canoe, say 36" beam, with a 2' transom and 12' long will support about 400 pounds on a 4" LWL. This assumes (below with stations on 24" centers) no overhangs, common angle sides and a logical rocker for this size boat. Make the bottom from 3/8" (9 mm) and the sides from 1/4" (6 mm) plywood. Tape the seams and put in both an inwale and a rub rail, along the top of the side planks. Two or three thwarts will hold the boat apart, with a simple 1x3 (19x75 mm) stem piece to hold a bow eye. This is a pretty fat 12' canoe, but she'll hold a bunch of weight and a small outboard will push her more then fast enough. 2 HP will do, 5 HP will be way more then she needs, but it'll be fun. If you plan on using the outboard most of the time, consider removing most of the aft rocker in the bottom and a 5 HP outboard will make this puppy scoot to 10 - 12 MPH. With the rocker she has, you'll max out in the 8 MPH range.
     

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  4. Horsley-Anarak
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Horsley-Anarak Junior Member

  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Have a couple of coolies on hand to lift it onto the roof racks, and the options open up ! :D
     
  6. kaid
    Joined: Feb 2015
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    Location: Australia

    kaid Junior Member

    Thanks for the replies guys but I found a design by Devlin that he calls 5x10 [its made from one sheet of 5x10 ply hence the name] At aprox 3x1 meters its about half way between a canoe and a skiff can take a small outboard and weights in at 26kg which i can lift onto my roof rakes. This is what i've been looking for. Thanks again for your answers
     

  7. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

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