Boat design... I want to build one, so I did a little leg work...

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by parkland, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    parkland Senior Member


    Thats a crazy video !!!

    Were you alright?
     
  2. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    parkland Senior Member


    Before, when I was pricing out aluminum to build one, I think a 36 ' boat was about 3600$ for the aluminum.
    The problem with building a hull from scratch, is that I think there might be insurance issues?
    I don't really care much about insurance, but if you need to have it to dock in a marina, that creates a major issue.

    If there was zero drawback to building you're own hulls, I could go grab a cheap 14x70 mobile home, add a cabin on the front with steering controls, and build custom steel or aluminum pontoons for it.

    There are so many interesting things that could be done, but the more I get realistic about things, the more I stand back and look at the feasibility side of things.
     
  3. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Well that's good.
    What about a big scow? I think I mentioned this on the other thread.

    As for the bike crash-a bit banged up,bike was scraped all up and broke the clutch lever off. I shifted clutchless most of the time anyways,rode home and it was only a bother at stops.
    Fixed it up to like new,still have it- two strokes forever.
     
  4. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

  5. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    LOL @ 2 strokes forever haha.
    Thats lucky you didn't severely hurt yourself in the middle of nowhere.

    I think a big scrow would not get anywhere close to what I'd like for fuel consumption.
    Sure would be cheap and easy to weld a hull that style haha.
     
  6. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    I wouldn't worry about mpg at all.

    Any boat at low speeds gets good mileage and why worry about an extra few bucks an hour when you may only run it for 50 hours a year?

    Say 50 hours at 15 kmh= 750 kms and IIRC Kootenay lake is under 100 kms long...so unless you are planning to go up and down the bloody lake from end to end-8 times each holiday- you may only save a couple hundred $.


    Get the point?
     
  7. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    Yes but also you can't get insurance on a home built hull though, can you?
    No insurance = no marinas.


    So... it's either build a boat, that is trailerable...
    or buy a bigger one thats insurable and can stay in the marina....

    How come I feel like I'm back at square 1? lol.
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can insure just about anything, though ugly and stupid costs a lot more.
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Marinas always ask for insurance. When you enter a foreign country they always ask for insurance before issuing you a cruising permit.

    As Par stated you certainly can insure a home built boat. Ask your insurance company.
     
  10. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    OK, so I'm sure everyone noticed my "POR" has been up in the air..
    The reason is that I was thinking it would be an option to not buy any property at that lake, and exclusively use a larger boat and live on it.

    Unfortunately, after contacting 6 marina's on kootenay lake, 32 ft long seems to be about the largest size boat anyone can accommodate, and that is not enough boat for us to stay on for several months.

    So, back to the drawing board.

    It will have to be something either smaller and trailerable, or something modular that can be assembled semi-quickly at a launch ramp.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You could build two 32 footers and dock them side by side.
     
  12. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    LOL :p

    They also have entry width issues, a 32x16 catamaran doesn't sound welcome to anyone I asked.

    There is one guy there that made a houseboat with those blue plastic barrels, and moored it in the bay with an anchor.
    From what I gather, he is sort of the "black sheep" of the harbor haha.
    It sits there year round.

    I don't know if I want to start p'ing people off.

    I assume he also doesn't pay any fees either.
     
  13. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
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    bpw Senior Member

    I had liability insurance on my home-built 1977 vintage Ferro-cement sailboat, so it is possible to insure just about anything.

    Very few countries ask for insurance before insuring a cruising permit, can't actually think of any off the top of my head. But I am not familiar with Europe, just north, central and south America. Chile used to require insurance but they don't anymore.
     
  14. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

    Hmmm.....

    Well I've been going over everything over and over on paper, and I have 2 boat designs, both quite different.

    1 is an aluminum trawler inspired 32' boat, with a folding bow section.

    The other is a steel design that would require 2 loads.

    I know a guy thats great and experienced with welding steel, but I'm not sure if I could talk him into an aluminum project. He is looking for work though.
     

  15. parkland
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    parkland Senior Member

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