Boat Chrome Parts Restoration / Winch Rechroming (Europe)

Discussion in 'Services & Employment' started by spydre100, Apr 19, 2011.

  1. spydre100
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    Location: London, UK

    spydre100 New Member

  2. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    Info

    Hi Spydre100,

    Would you please explain to me about the rechrome process

    I have seen some jobs that worked out real well and others that are simply crap

    What is "double" chromed and is it true that chrome is clear, it is the nickle plating that is shiny. Ta
     
  3. spydre100
    Joined: Apr 2011
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    spydre100 New Member

    Yes you are correct. Chrome is clear - The nickel provides the silver reflective finish. Nickel is kinda a greenish tint. In order to chrome something the process is as follows:

    1. The item must be polished to a near mirror finish - as the chrome must look like a mirror when applied - thus the surface must be made flat, reflective.
    2. A layer of copper is applied - This makes a good bonding for the nickel as copper is very conductive - and chrome plating is an electroplating process. The copper is also a good primer - a good polisher will polish the copper - mushing - is the term we use - to mush the copper into any pits or blemishes. This is a process used in rechroming of old parts that are pitted or badly worn.
    3. Nickel is then applied - this is where some improvements can be made - as it can then be polished and then re-applied - adding more depth to the reflective finish.
    4. Then finally the chrome layer is added - which protects the nickel - years ago chrome was just "nickel" chrome was added to protect the nickel from the elements.

    Chrome restoration is a difficult process - you are right that some items come out great and others - awful. This can be for two reasons: 1. of course poor workmanship-usually at the polishing stage, 2. The parts is just not in good condition.

    Its a little like respraying a card body - you dont know how bad things are until you strip the paint off. And what lies underneath can be a load of holes. With car body restoration they can weld, fill, high build to make old look like new - with chrome none of those techniques work.

    That all said - if your expectations are realistic your outcome should be worthwhile, as the whole process is not cheap.

    You can read more about all of this here:


    http://www.ashfordchroming.com/chroming-process
     
  4. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    Thank you kind Sir.
     

  5. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    Yes, very informative. Thank you.
     
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