Boat Building Projects Underway

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Manie B, Sep 29, 2009.

  1. noahtodras
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Location: Richmond, Va

    noahtodras New Member

    stripped outrigger

    Been sailing for a little over a year, couldn't stop thinking about finally building a boat of my own efforts, something that might match what I want out of sailing more than any of the boats I've gotten used off craigslist in the past 12 months..

    My goals for this are:

    -cartoppable
    -single handed
    -can be paddled fairly conveniently
    -can accommodate a carload of people
    -not an obnoxious setup time
    -stability
    -speed (or at least, thrill)

    After endless deliberation and not actually building anything, I finally decided to build an outrigger; a center hull longer, narrower, and ideally lighter than my royalex oldtown camper, with amas, akas, maybe even trampolines or hiking seats... all controlled by the captain, who steers with his feet, controls lines led back to the cockpit, and when necessary, has hands free to paddle.

    So far I've put the main hull together out of western red cedar on station molds - the design of the molds is sort of a conservative result of eyeballing countless outrigger and single hull canoes on the internet, as well as the meager knowledge gleaned from the dinghies I've sailed and paddling the canoe. The strips are 1/4" by 3/4" bead and cove that I made myself, which I mention to illustrate their slight inconsistencies compared to those professionally made.

    I've got foam and plywood to construct the amas, which I'll hopefully accomplish soon and have pictures.

    This is my first boatbuilding project and I feel like for every step forward I am continually correcting mistakes I had no idea I was making, and I welcome any constructive advice or criticism.

    It'll probably take me a few posts to figure out how to best embed images... I've attached a photo of the stripped center hull, which I am currently sanding fair before I glass it.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Trent hink
    Joined: Sep 2013
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    Location: Sarasota fl

    Trent hink Junior Member

  3. Joris
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: belgium

    Joris Junior Member

    About a year ago i started building my first boat. Thanks to many members i've been able to keep the project going and it looks like eventually the thing will at least float... some day.:D
    I thought i'd share some pictures as promised (long ago, sorry for that, been kinda busy;))

    http://s1296.photobucket.com/user/blancoracing/library/

    grts,
    Joris
     
  4. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    [​IMG]

    looking good so far...
     
  5. Barn Lancaster
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Lancashire England

    Barn Lancaster New Member

    I'm building a Vagabond 23 I would appreciate any advice on how to achieve a good finish on the outside of the hull I don.t want to spend money on epoxy only to turn it to dust sanding it, although turning money into dust is an integral part of sailing

    https://www.facebook.com/barn.lancaster
     
  6. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Iroquois, Ontario

    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Hi Barn

    I spent 3-1/2 months this year filling & fairing a 31' ply hull by myself. The worst part was the taped seams. I spent a lot of time feathering out the edges of the tape to get them as flat as possible. The rest of the process is pretty straight forward. I used System 3 Quickfair mostly for the ease of use. No home recipes that I could come up with worked as well.

    Use a metal batten as long as you can handle to spread the fairing compound and take special care to get it as smooth and consistent as possible. I had ordered a Flexi-cat spreader for this but it didn't arrive in time. I ended up using a drywall knife and the results were pretty poor. Your local hardware store may have a project metal bin with some 1/8" X 2" aluminum which will work well.

    I did have two Flexi-cat sanders, 23" X 4-1/2" and 33' X 2-3/4". The 23" sander is a real workhorse. There are others on the market that work well such as Dura Blok & 3M long board sanders. I find the Dura Blok work well on curved surfaces. The Flexi-cats are a little pricey but you can always sell them when you're done your project.

    Good luck with your project.
     
  7. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I greatly empathize with you on this one.

    KnottyBuoyz has some valuable insights there - and really, it gets down to just sheer elbow bending.

    You never, ever get to the stage where you can step back, sight along the hull and say "There - perfect!"

    The other big shock is finding out the cost of the final spray coat. I have read articles on commercial boatbuilding where the final painting cost more than the hull and engine.

    Can I just say - perfection is over-rated, and you may just prefer to get it working. :)
     
  8. Barn Lancaster
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Lancashire England

    Barn Lancaster New Member

    Thanks for the replies I have a feeling I'll be back for more when the time comes!
     
  9. Commuter Boats
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Southeast Alaska

    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    You're up against a common problem and the short answer is; don't put putty on the high spots and don't sand on the low spots...
    It's common practice to spread a coat of putty over the entire project and then sanded it all off to no gain.
    Allen Vaitses in " Covering Wooden Boats with Fiberglass" has a well-written chapter on finishing.
    Gerald
     
  10. rowerwet
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Merrimack Valley

    rowerwet Junior Member

  11. rowerwet
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Merrimack Valley

    rowerwet Junior Member

  12. rowerwet
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Merrimack Valley

    rowerwet Junior Member

  13. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member


    Lucky you are only doing a small boat

    Check this out to see how you should have done the chines
    http://www.bateau2.com/howto/foam5.php
     
  14. rowerwet
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Merrimack Valley

    rowerwet Junior Member

    I've read that build, the builders expected the foam to have the same stiffness and puncture resistance as wood, without all that extra weight in glass and epoxy foam will not.
    I'm trying a construction method that let's the foam work as foam, strong in compression, but relying on the fabric skin for tension loads, the joints are not really structural, the fabric is the strength.
     

  15. ketan.p
    Joined: Nov 2014
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    Location: India

    ketan.p New Member

    Dear Manie B,

    This is ketan from India, I would like to know your source of getting information on tenders and projects for shipbuilding Industry?

    Please contact me on below:

    Ketan Parmar
    Tele : 00919022768477
    Email : ketan.p@tendersontime.com
    Skype : ketan.p@tendersontime.com
     
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